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Amber D. Mosewich, Catherine M. Sabiston, Kent C. Kowalski, Patrick Gaudreau and Peter R.E. Crocker

Women athletes encounter many potentially stressful situations in competitive sport, such as body dissatisfaction, injury, bullying, eating disorders, coach conflicts, poor performance and performance plateau, self-criticism, and social comparisons, that are often accompanied by negative self

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John Kerr

first that applied Kerr’s ( 1999 , 2005 ) reversal-theory-based approach to physical aggression in sport to a sample of women athletes. Reversal theory ( Apter, 1997 , 2001 ) provides a structural framework for categorizing and explaining motives for different types of aggression. The approach had

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Meghan S. Ingstrup, Amber D. Mosewich and Nicholas L. Holt

The purpose of this study was to explore factors that contributed to the development of self-compassion among highly self-compassionate women varsity athletes. More specifically, the research question was: how did women varsity athletes with high self-compassion perceive they became self-compassionate? To purposefully sample participants, 114 women varsity athletes completed the Self-Compassion Scale (Neff, 2003b). Ten athletes with high self-compassion scores then participated in individual interviews and a follow-up second interview. Data were analyzed using interpretive phenomenological analysis (Smith & Osborn, 2003). Analysis produced three main themes that contributed to the development of self-compassion: (a) role of parents (seeking and receiving help from parents, parents teaching self-kindness, parents putting experiences in perspective); (b) gaining self-awareness; and (c) learning from others (peers, siblings, coaches, sport psychologists). These findings provide insights into the ways in which self-compassion can be learned and taught, and have implications for practitioners who work with women athletes.

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Trisha Leahy and Rachel Harrigan

Narrative therapy is a form of therapeutic intervention underpinned by a philosophy of language proposing that meaning is socially constructed through language. Power relations and social and personal contexts are understood as central to the construction of meaning. Narrative therapy represents an approach to therapeutic practice that assumes that people experience problems in their lives when the dominant stories, which they or others have constructed of their lives, do not sufficiently represent their lived experience. In this article we provide an exposition of narrative therapy, its philosophical influences and key processes. We demonstrate key tenets in action via a psychoeducational intervention attempting to facilitate positive body image with a team of 15 elite young women athletes. Anonymous, written, evaluative feedback of the seven-session program suggests a generally positive outcome. Narrative therapy can be a useful addition to the repertoire of clinical skills of sport psychologists.

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Trevor Cote, Amy Baltzell and Robert Diehl

beneficial for future MMTS programs. Likewise, Ferguson, Kowalski, Mack, and Sabiston ( 2014 ) substantiated the value of self-compassion as they found that women athletes’ perceived self-compassion may increase positivity, perseverance, and responsibility during emotionally difficult sport situations

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Elizabeth M. Mullin, James E. Leone and Suzanne Pottratz

, self-acceptance, and normalization of lesbian and bisexual identities as key reasons for women athletes. The perception that women’s athletics was associated with lesbian sexual orientations added to a sense of safety. Players also identified the importance of trailblazers, or individuals who had come