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Nicole M. LaVoi, Erin Becker and Heather D. Maxwell

Given the lack of nationalized and required coach education programs for those involved with youth sports, self-help coaching books are a common source of knowledge. With the exception of critiques of young adult sports fiction (Kane, 1998; Kreigh & Kane, 1997), sport media research has lacked investigation of mediums that impact non-elite youth athletes and adolescent girls, and youth coaches and parents of young female athletes. The purpose of this study is to examine ‘coaching girls’ books–specifically how differences between female and male athletes are constructed. A content analysis was performed on selective chapters within a criterion sampling of six best-selling, self-help ‘coaching girls’ books. Results indicate coaching girls books are written from a perspective of inflated gender difference, and represent a simplified, stereo-typed account of coaching girls. Four first-order themes emerged from analysis: Problematizing Coaching Girls, Girls Constructed As “Other,” Ambivalence, and Sustaining the Gender Binary. Implications of these themes are discussed.

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Leanne Norman

this context, there are three coaching qualification strands available, including the youth coaching pathway, the goalkeeping coaching pathway, and the main, core pathway ( The Football Association, 2017 ). The core strand includes five levels of qualification: Level I, Level II, UEFA B License (Level

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Meg G. Hancock, Alicia Cintron and Lindsey Darvin

their respective parents who served as a coach. For example: Sport was a big part of my family’s culture. . . . My father was a youth coach. Not only was it a participant experience but when my father would coach a little league team then we were all involved. Even at that level there is an

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Sarah I. Leberman and Nicole M. LaVoi

Despite the ubiquitous presence of mothers in sport contexts, mothers’ voices are often absent in the sport literature, particularly at the youth sport level. A phenomenological approach was used to explore the experiences of working mother volunteer youth sport coaches. A role-triad model based on the work-family enrichment and role enhancement literature provided the theoretical framework. The purpose was to understand how and why working mother-coaches mange this role triad and to identify mother-worker skills which may transfer to youth coaching and vice versa. Semistructured interviews were conducted with eight working mother-coaches and analyzed for themes. Findings suggest that notions of being a good mother and reasons for coaching are very similar, including spending time together, developing life skills and role modeling. Participants negotiated multiple roles using cognitive tools, such as reframing and separation of roles. The reciprocal benefits of motherhood, working and coaching for themselves and others were highlighted.

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Daniel Gould

children and youth who may lack motivation for participation? Associated with this question is discovering how volunteer youth coaches, most of whom have little training, can effectively coach children who may lack basic motivation for participation. While previous research on youth sport participation