Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 61 items for :

  • "Asian American" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Mitali S. Thanawala, Juned Siddique, John A. Schneider, Alka M. Kanaya, Andrew J. Cooper, Swapna S. Dave, Nicola Lancki and Namratha R. Kandula

: 763 – 776 . PubMed ID: 25854295 doi:10.1111/bjhp.12139 25854295 10.1111/bjhp.12139 11. South Asian Americans Leading Together . A demographic snapshot of South Asians in the United States . 2012 . http://saalt.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Demographic-Snapshot-Asian-American-Foundation-2012.pdf

Restricted access

Stanley Thangaraj

(Asian-ness and Asian American-ness) as another constellation of racial heteronormativity moored to Asian and Asian American-ness that proved necessary for Woods to wash off the negative meanings associated with black male sexuality in 21st century United States of America. This reading practice is

Restricted access

Rod K. Dishman and Claudio Nigg

Background:

Measuring the way people vary across time in meeting recommended levels of physical activity is a prerequisite to quantifying exposure in outcome studies or identifying determinants of sufficient physical activity. The study determined whether distinct patterns of change in sufficient physical activity could be identified in a population.

Methods:

A cohort (N = 497) from a random, multiethnic sample of adults living in Hawaii was assessed every 6 months for 2 years beginning spring 2004. Latent transition analysis classified people as sufficiently or insufficiently active each time.

Results:

In the total cohort, odds that people would move from insufficient to sufficient activity (45% to 59%) at each 6-month transition were higher than odds they would move from sufficient to insufficient activity (8% to 13%). However, those odds, as well as types and amounts of physical activity, differed widely among and within 3 of 4 transition classes that represented 21% of the cohort.

Conclusions:

Point-prevalence of sufficient physical activity in the total cohort was similar to contemporary U.S. estimates. However, physical activity varied between and within subgroups of the cohort. Further research is needed using self-report and objective measures to determine patterns of change in sufficient physical activity in other representative cohorts.

Restricted access

Jennifer D. Roberts, Lindsey Rodkey, Rashawn Ray and Brian E. Saelens

had statistically significant higher rates of AT (27.7%) compared with non-Hispanic African Americans (15.5%), Asian Americans (13.4%), and whites (9.4%). 21 The difference between non-Hispanic African Americans and whites was also statistically significant. 21 Associations between income and AT are

Restricted access

Anthony P. Kontos and Alfiee M. Breland-Noble

This article examines from a theoretical perspective the most pertinent issues related to providing sport psychology consulting to athletes of color. A review of multicultural concepts including identity, acculturation/enculturation, generalizations, and stereotyping is presented. These concepts provide a framework within which to address issues and examples pertinent to African American, Latino, Asian American, and American Indian athletes. A multicultural sport psychology approach incorporating worldview and integrative theory is examined. Finally, future issues in multicultural sport psychology including changes in the population, female athletes of color, and the need for sport psychologists of color are discussed.

Restricted access

Elizabeth A. Kelley, Namratha R. Kandula, Alka M. Kanaya and Irene H. Yen

Background:

The neighborhood built environment can have a strong influence on physical activity levels, particularly walking for transport. In examining racial/ethnic differences in physical activity, one important and understudied group is South Asians. This study aims to describe the association between neighborhood walkability and walking for transport among South Asian men and women in the United States in the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) Study.

Methods:

A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 using the baseline dataset of the MASALA study (N = 906). Mean age was 55 years old and 54% of the sample was male. Weekly minutes spent walking for transport was assessed using a questionnaire adapted from the Cross-Cultural Activity Participation Study. Neighborhood walkability was measured using Walk Score, a composite index of walkability.

Results:

After adjusting for covariates, with each 10-point increase in Walk Score, South Asian American men engaged in 13 additional minutes per week of walking for transport (P = .008). No association was observed between walkability and walking for transport in South Asian American women.

Conclusions:

Results provide new evidence for how the effects of environmental influences on walking for transport may vary between South Asian men and women.

Restricted access

Constancio R. Arnaldo

By Nicole Willms, Rutgers University Press , 2017, New Brunswick, NJ. For some Asian American girls and women, sports have been important spaces to claim their membership to American society. Sports, in other words, have served as spaces for Asian Americans to carve out a sense of identity and to

Restricted access

Isabell Mills

. Regarding the Washington Redskins case, the franchise trademark was reinstated based on a previous case related to the Asian American rock band The Slants. Overall, the Supreme Court vindicated the National Football League franchise based on the First Amendment; the government cannot cancel a registered

Full access

Nisha Botchwey, Myron F. Floyd, Keshia Pollack Porter, Carmen L. Cutter, Chad Spoon, Tom L. Schmid, Terry L. Conway, J. Aaron Hipp, Anna J. Kim, M. Renee Umstattd Meyer, Amanda L. Walker, Tina J. Kauh and Jim F. Sallis

In the United States, nearly 1 in 3 young people is overweight or obese. Lower-income toddlers, children, and adolescents in historically underserved populations—African American, American Indian, Latino-Hispanic, and subpopulations of Asian Americans and Pacific Islander cultures—are at highest

Restricted access

Leticia Oseguera, Dan Merson, C. Keith Harrison and Sue Rankin

Black and non-Black peers at PWIs. Still roughly 20% of college athletes identify as a racial group other than Black or White ( NCAA Office of Inclusion, 2016 ). When Latina/o, Asian American, Pacific Islander, or multi-racial groups are included in large data-based studies they are sometimes collapsed