Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 95 items for :

  • "Birmingham" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Scott Cheatham, Monique Mokha and Matt Lee

Context:

Hip-resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA) has become a popular procedure in the treatment of hip-joint arthritis in individuals under the age of 65 y. Although the body of literature examining operative procedures has grown, there is a lack of consistent reporting of the effectiveness of an HRA postoperative rehabilitation program. To date, no systematic reviews have evaluated the available evidence on postoperative rehabilitation programs.

Objective:

To evaluate the available evidence on postoperative rehabilitation programs after HRA.

Evidence Acquisition:

A systematic review was conducted according to the PRISMA guidelines. A search of PubMed, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, ProQuest, and Google Scholar was conducted in April 2014 using the following keywords alone and in combination: postoperative, postsurgical, rehabilitation, physical therapy, programs, hip resurfacing, arthroplasty, and metal-on-metal. The grading of studies was conducted using the PEDro and Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine scales.

Evidence Synthesis:

The authors identified 648 citations, 4 of which met the inclusion criteria. The qualifying studies yielded 1 randomized control trial, 2 case reports, and 1 case series, for a total of 90 patients. Patients were mostly male (n = 86), had a mean age of 48 ± 5.47 y, and had been physically active before HRA. Postoperative rehabilitation programs varied in length (range 8–24 wk) and consisted of at least 3 phases. The methodology to assess program effects varied, but all 4 studies did measure a combination of function, pain, and quality of life using written questionnaires, with follow-up ranging from 9 mo to 1 y. The most common questionnaire was the Harris Hip Score.

Conclusion:

This review found postoperative rehabilitation programs after HRA to be underinvestigated. Limited results indicate that postoperative rehabilitation programs may be effective in improving gait (stride length, velocity, and cadence), hip range of motion, and pain and function, as measured by questionnaires, but not hip strength.

Restricted access

Elizabeth Thompson, Theo H. Versteegh, Tom J. Overend, Trevor B. Birmingham and Anthony A. Vandervoort

Our purpose was to describe heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), and perceived exertion (RPE) responses to submaximal isokinetic concentric (CON) and eccentric (ECC) exercise at the same absolute torque output in older adults. Peak torques for ECC and CON knee extension were determined in healthy older males (n = 13) and females (n = 7). Subjects then performed separate, randomly ordered, 2-min bouts of CON and ECC exercise. Heart rate and MAP increased (p < .001) from resting values throughout both exercise bouts. CON exercise elicited a significantly greater cardiovascular response than ECC exercise after 60 s. Peak HR, MAP, and RPE after CON exercise were greater than after ECC exercise (p < .01). At the same absolute torque output, isokinetic CON knee extension exercise resulted in a significantly greater level of cardiovascular stress than ECC exercise. These results are relevant to resistance testing and exercise in older people.

Restricted access

Gina M. McCaskill, Olivio J. Clay, Peng Li, Richard E. Kennedy, Kathryn L. Burgio and Cynthia J. Brown

Birmingham (UAB) Study of Aging (SOA). Furthermore, we examined the data for racial differences on all-cause mortality. Methods Study Design and Participants The UAB SOA was a longitudinal 8.5 years investigation that examined racial differences in mobility in a sample of Black and White community

Restricted access

Jon Michael Mills and George L. Daniels

The amount of time dedicated to sports coverage in local news has decreased substantially in recent years. In fact, some networks have eliminated traditional sports segments or outsourced them to national organizations. The now defunct Sinclair Broadcast Group’s SportsCentral represented a cost-efficient way to produce local sports segments in multiple media markets, and this study sought to understand how SportsCentral broadcasts compared with traditional broadcasts in 3 markets. An analysis of SportsCentral segments over a 17-month period in the Birmingham, AL; Oklahoma City; and Tampa–St. Petersburg markets showed that traditional sportscasts provided more local sports coverage than shows airing SportsCentral. While relying more heavily on satellite-generated content, sportscasts using SportsCentral had a wider variety of stories and aired more sports feature stories and franchises than the traditional sportscast. However, local newscasts found ways to integrate sports coverage into the news broadcast to cover late-breaking or important local stories.

Restricted access

Mark W. Swanson, Eric Bodner, Patricia Sawyer and Richard M. Allman

Little is known about the effect of reduced vision on physical activity in older adults. This study evaluates the association of visual acuity level, self-reported vision, and ocular disease conditions with leisure-time physical activity and calculated caloric expenditure. A cross-sectional study of 911 subjects 65 yr and older from the University of Alabama at Birmingham Study of Aging (SOA) cohort was conducted evaluating the association of vision-related variables to weekly kilocalorie expenditure calculated from the 17-item Leisure Time Physical Activity Questionnaire. Ordinal logistic regression was used to evaluate possible associations while controlling for potential confounders. In multivariate analyses, each lower step in visual acuity below 20/50 was significantly associated with reduced odds of having a higher level of physical activity, OR 0.81, 95% CI 0.67, 0.97. Reduced visual acuity appears to be independently associated with lower levels of physical activity among community-dwelling adults.

Restricted access

Maria Grazia Benedetti, Lisa Berti, Antonio Frizziero, Donata Ferrarese and Sandro Giannini

Context:

Surface replacement of the hip is aimed especially at active patients, and it seems to achieve optimal functional results in a short time if associated with a tailored rehabilitation protocol.

Objective:

To assess the functional outcome in a group of active patients after hip resurfacing.

Design:

Clinical measurement and controlled laboratory study in a case series.

Setting:

Gait-analysis laboratory.

Participants:

8 patients and a control group of 10 subjects.

Interventions:

Patients treated with Birmingham hip-resurfacing system and a tailored rehabilitation protocol

Main Outcome Measures:

Clinical assessment (Harris Hip Score [HHS]) and instrumented gait analysis including muscular electromyographic assessment. Patients were assessed preoperatively and at 3 and 9 mo follow-up after surgery.

Results:

HHS showed a significant increase from the baseline to 3- (P = .008) and 9-month (P = .014) follow-up; 5 patients returned to sport. Gait pattern in the presented case series of patients improved substantially 3 mo postoperatively, and minimal further changes were present 9 months postoperatively. Residual abnormalities of time-distance and hip-kinematics parameters were consistent with a slow gait. A complete restoration of the muscle-activation pattern during gait was achieved.

Conclusion:

Hip resurfacing associated with a rehabilitation protocol based on the characteristics of the implant provides excellent clinical and functional outcome, especially for very active patients.

Open access

Anthony Amorose, Illinois State University, USA Lindsey Blom, Ball State University, USA Ian Boardley, University of Birmingham, UK Steven Bray, McMaster University, Canada Mark Bruner, Nipissing University, Canada Travis Dorsch, Utah State University, USA Andy Driska, Michigan State University

Restricted access

Eva A. Jaarsma, Damian Haslett and Brett Smith

knowledge is assumed to be subjective and coconstructed through relational interactions) ( Sparkes & Smith, 2014 ). Sampling and Participants Ethical approval for this study was obtained from the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics ethical review committee at the University of Birmingham

Restricted access

Anthony N. Turner, Geoff Marshall, Angelo Noto, Shyam Chavda, Nathan Atlay and David Kirby

.9 ± 15.1 224.6 ± 25.7 283.1 ± 38.2 222.6 ± 31.4 299.3 ± 49.6 −0.9 5.4 * Significantly greater at P  < .05. Anthropometric Data Body mass was measured to the nearest 0.1 kg with a precalibrated electronic weighing scale (Seca Alpha 770, Birmingham, UK). Stature was measured to the nearest 0.1 cm with a

Restricted access

Kerry E. Costello, Janie L. Astephen Wilson and Cheryl L. Hubley-Kozey

values ( Matthews, Hagstromer, Pober, & Bowles, 2012 ). In any given week, however, multiple factors can influence PA levels or act as barriers to PA, such as weather ( Feinglass et al., 2011 ; Robbins, Jones, Birmingham, & Maly, 2013 ), knee OA pain ( Robbins et al., 2011 ), or acute illness ( Toscos