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Interrater Reliability of the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency–Long Form

Brenda N. Wilson, Bonnie J. Kaplan, Susan G. Crawford, and Deborah Dewey

To examine the reliability of the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency-Long Form (BOTMP-LF), approximately 40 therapists completed a questionnaire on the administration and scoring of this test (72% response rate). A large degree of inconsistency between therapists was found. This prompted a study of interrater reliability of six therapists who received rigorous training on the BOTMP-LF. Results indicated that consistency of scoring between testers was statistically high for the battery, composite, and subtest scores. However, item-by-item agreement was low for many items, and agreement between raters on their diagnosis of the children as having motor problems was only fair to good. There was no difference in interrater reliability of the test for children with and without learning, attentional, or motor coordination problems. Some limitations of the BOTMP-LF are apparent from these studies.

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A Comparison of the Long and Short Forms of the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency

Joan M.S. Verderber and V. Gregory Payne

The relationship between the long and short forms of the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency was investigated. Forty-eight regular education students, who had been referred to adapted physical education, were administered the long form of this test. Short form scores were subsequently derived from the long form items. Pearson product-moment r values generally indicated strong relationships between long and short form scores when the data were converted to standard and percentile scores. T-test analyses, however, indicated that long and short form standard score mean differences were significant at the .01 level (conventional .05 alpha level was reduced to .01 by the Dunn Test) for the two younger age groups and the all-subjects group. These results indicate that placement decisions in adapted physical education may vary depending upon which form of the test is used.

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Balance and Coordination Proficiency of Age-Matched Male and Female Children and Adolescents With Intellectual Disabilities

Ken Pitetti, Ruth Ann Miller, and E. Michael Loovis

; and d. The participant performed the movement twice without prompting with the best score used for data analysis. Table 2 Items for Subtests of the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency Subtest Item Title Units Range of Score Test Score Ceiling ULC 1 Dropping and catching ball—both hands

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Motor Competence Levels in Young Children: A Cross-Cultural Comparison Between Belgium and Greece

Eva D’Hondt, Fotini Venetsanou, Antonis Kambas, and Matthieu Lenoir

KörperKoordinations Test für Kinder (KTK; Kiphard & Schilling, 1974 , 2007 ), focusing on gross motor coordination but not evaluating any object control or fine motor skills. Accordingly, the Short Form of the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency, Second Edition (BOT-2 SF; Bruininks & Bruininks, 2005

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Balance and Coordination Capacities of Male Children and Adolescents With Intellectual Disability

Ken Pitetti, Ruth Ann Miller, and Michael Loovis

Children and adolescents with intellectual disability (ID) exhibit a mixture of cognitive, motor, and psychosocial limitation. Identifying specific inadequacies in motor proficiency in youth with ID would improve therapeutic management to enhance functional capacity and health-related physical activity. The purpose of this study was to initiate descriptive data collection of gross motor skills of youth with ID and compare those skills with competency norms. The Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency (BOT-2) was used to measure 6 items for balance (BAL), 5 items for upper limb coordination (ULC), and 6 items for bilateral coordination (BLC) of 123 males (ages 8–18) with ID but without Down syndrome. The authors performed 2,840 assessments (10–32 for each item); 944, 985, and 913 for BAL, ULC, and BLC, respectively. Mean scores for all age groups for BAL, ULC, and BLC were consistently below BOT-2 criteria. Overall motor skills of males with ID are below the competence expected for children and adolescents without disabilities.

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Comparing Motor Competence of Sex- and Age-Matched Youth With Intellectual Disability From Brazil and the United States

Fabio Bertapelli, Ken Pitetti, Ruth A. Miller, Adam Jaeger, Michael Loovis, Wilson D. do Amaral-Junior, Marcos M. de Barros-Filho, and Gil Guerra-Junior

the Bruininks–Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency (BOT-2, for ages 4–21 years; Bruininks & Bruininks, 2005 ). Studies that used the TGMD-2 included youth with ID from Belgium, Finland, Hong Kong, The Netherlands, Philippines, and South Korea ( Capio et al., 2016 ; Eguia et al., 2015 ; Foley et

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Effect of Yoga on the Motor Proficiency of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and the Feasibility of its Inclusion in Special School Environments

Sindhu Shanker and Balaram Pradhan

educators. Such skills include basic functional skills, daily living skills, and academic skills ( Dasgupta, 2002 ). Generally, the children spend around 4–6 hr in school. Motor Proficiency Bruininks–Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency, Brief Form-2 ( Bruininks & Bruininks, 2010 ) is a short standardized

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Moving Well-Being Well: Evaluating the Efficacy, Impact on Gender, and Role of Teacher Fidelity of a Fundamental Movement Skill-Based Intervention in Irish Primary School Children

Nathan Gavigan, Johann Issartel, Cameron Peers, and Sarahjane Belton

stability/balance component ( Rudd et al., 2015 ). To this end, a subset of the Bruininks–Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency 2 (BOT-2) Short Form ( Bruininks et al., 2013 ) was used. Much like the TGMD-3, the BOT-2 has been widely used in research and has been shown to demonstrate strong reliability

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Moving Well-Being Well: Evaluating the Efficacy, Impact on Gender, and Role of Teacher Fidelity of a Fundamental Movement Skill-Based Intervention in Irish Primary School Children

Nathan Gavigan, Johann Issartel, Cameron Peers, and Sarahjane Belton

.23 5.439 Note . M  = mean combined FMS raw score from the TGMD-3 and BOT-2; FMS = fundamental movement skills; TGMD-3 = Test of Gross Motor Development—Third Edition; BOT-2 = Bruininks–Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency 2. Figure 3 —Percentage of children achieving mastery pre- and postintervention

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An 8-Week Virtual Exercise Training Program for Pediatric Solid Organ Transplant Recipients

Nikol K. Grishin, Astrid M. De Souza, Julie Fairbairn, A. William Sheel, E. Puterman, Tom Blydt-Hansen, James E. Potts, and Kathryn R. Armstrong

Program Participants were asked to complete the following assessments prior to starting the program and within 1 week of program completion: (1) Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency Scale (second edition) (BOT-2), strength subtest ( 1 , 2 ); (2) Physical Activity Questionnaire for Children (−C