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Mike Pryzbek, Julie Richardson, Lehana Thabane and Ada Tang

diabetes ( Mugabo, Li, & Reiner, 2010 ). High-sensitivity C-reactive protein has also been positively associated with the incidence of cardiovascular disease, including first ( Moore et al., 2013 ; Wakugawa et al., 2006 ) and recurrent stroke ( Li et al., 2016 ; Kuwashiro et al., 2013 ). The specific

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Jacob D. Meyer, Mary S. Hayney, Christopher L. Coe, Cameron L. Ninos and Bruce P. Barrett

, 2009 ; Rosenkranz, 2007 ; Wellen & Hotamisligil, 2005 ). Commonly employed measures include C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), which respond acutely to infection or trauma but can also reflect subclinical pro-inflammatory activity. In addition, in clinical settings, interferon gamma

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Michael R. Richardson, Tammie M. Johnson, Peter T. Katzmarzyk, Earl S. Ford, William R. Boyer and James R. Churilla

Background:

Few studies have examined the gender differences between C-reactive protein (CRP) and muscle strengthening activity (MSA).

Methods:

The sample (n = 7533) included U.S. adult (≥20 years of age).participants in the 1999–2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Created categories of MSA participation included no MSA (referent group), some MSA (≥1 to <2 days/week), and meeting the 2008 Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) recommendation (≥2 days/week). The dependent variable was elevated CRP (>3 to 10 mg/L).

Results:

Analysis revealed significantly lower odds of having elevated CRP for women reporting some MSA (OR 0.64; 95% CI 0.44–0.93, P = .0191). Significantly lower odds of men having elevated CRP was observed in those reporting MSA volumes meeting the DHHS recommendation (OR 0.72; 95% CI 0.59–0.88, P = .0019). Following adjustment for waist circumference (WC) these odds remained significant in men but not women.

Conclusions:

These results suggest that WC may mediate the associations between MSA and CRP and this relationship may be stronger in women.

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James LeCheminant, Larry Tucker and Kenric Russell

Background:

This study investigated the relationship between objectively-measured total physical activity (PA), and intensity of PA and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) in 211 healthy, middle-age women (43.1 ± 3.0 y). In addition, this study examined the extent to which age, BMI, abdominal circumference, and body fat percentage operated as confounders in these associations.

Methods:

PA was objectively measured for 7 continuous days using accelerometry. Fasting blood samples were taken, from which CRP was measured using a solid phase ELISA. Body mass index (BMI) (kg/m2), abdominal circumference measured at the umbilicus, and body fat percentage using air displacement plethysmography, were assessed.

Results:

Total PA (activity counts) was significantly and inversely related to CRP concentrations (F = 7.76, P = .006) as was vigorous-intensity PA. After adjusting for differences in body fat percentage, total PA and vigorous-intensity PA were no longer significant predictors of CRP. Abdominal circumference and BMI also tended to weaken the relationship between total or vigorous-intensity PA and CRP but not to the same extent as body fat percentage.

Conclusions:

These findings suggest that higher total and vigorous-intensity PA levels are significantly related to lower CRP levels in healthy, middle-age women; however, this relationship is largely a function of differences in body fat percentage.

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Masashi Miyashita, Stephen F. Burns and David J. Stensel

The current study investigated the acute effects of accumulating short bouts of running on circulating concentrations of postprandial triacylglycerol (TAG) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Ten men, age 21–32 yr, completed two 1-d trials. On 1 occasion participants ran at 70% of maximum oxygen uptake in six 5-min bouts (i.e., 8:30, 10, and 11:30 a.m. and 1, 2:30, and 4 p.m.) with 85 min rest between runs. On another occasion participants rested throughout the day. In both trials, participants consumed test meals at 9 a.m. and 12 p.m. In each trial, venous blood samples were collected at 8:30, 10, and 11:30 a.m. and 1, 2:30, 4, and 5:30 p.m. for plasma TAG measurement and at 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. for serum CRP measurement. Total area under the curve for plasma TAG concentration versus time was 10% lower on the exercise trial than the control trial (M ± SEM: 13.5 ± 1.8 vs. 15.0 ± 1.9 mmol · 9 hr−1 · L−1; p = .004). Serum CRP concentrations did not differ between trials or over time. This study demonstrates that accumulating short bouts of running reduces postprandial plasma TAG concentrations (a marker for cardiovascular disease risk) but does not alter serum CRP concentrations.

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Stephen F. Burns, Masashi Miyashita, Chihoko Ueda and David J. Stensel

The present study examined how multiple bouts of resistance exercise, performed over 1 d, influence 2 risk factors—postprandial triacylglycerol (TAG) and serum C-reactive-protein (CRP) concentrations—associated with coronary heart disease. Twenty-four men age 23.5 (SD 3.4) y completed two 2-d trials, exercise and control, at least 1 wk apart in a counterbalanced randomized design. On day 1 of the exercise trials participants completed 20 sets of 15 repetitions of 5 different resistance exercises divided into five 45-min bouts of exercise—100 sets and 1500 repetitions in total for all exercises. Exercises were performed at 30–40% of 1-repetition maximum. Blood samples were taken before and after exercise. On day 1 of the control trial participants were inactive, with blood samples taken at time points corresponding to the exercise trial. On day 2 of both trials participants consumed a test meal (0.89 g fat, 1.23 g carbohydrate, 0.4 g protein, 60 kJ per kg body mass). Blood samples were obtained fasted and for 6 h post prandially. Total area under the postprandial TAG concentration versus time curve was 12% lower in the exercise than in the control trial (8.76 [3.54] vs. 9.94 [4.31] mmol·L-1·6 h, respectively; P = 0.037). Serum CRP concentrations did not change over the 2 d in the control trial but increased in the exercise trial: trial × time interaction (P = 0.028). Multiple bouts of resistance exercise reduce postprandial TAG concentrations but increase serum CRP concentrations. The extent to which these findings are clinically relevant requires further study.

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Yan Wang, Lea A. Cupul-Uicab, Walter J. Rogan, Merete Eggesbo, Gregory Travlos, Ralph Wilson and Matthew P. Longnecker

Background:

Pregnant women who are physically active have a lower risk of preeclampsia and gestational diabetes than women who are less active. One possible mechanism is a reduction in low-grade inflammation, as measured by plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP). The association between exercise and CRP in pregnant women, however, has not been adequately investigated.

Methods:

A total of 537 pregnant women, enrolled around the 17th week of gestation in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study in 2003 to 2004, were studied. Self-reported recreational exercise was recalled for both 3 months before pregnancy and early pregnancy. The total energy expenditure from recreational exercise (total recreational exercise, metabolic equivalent of task [MET]-hr/week) was estimated, and low-, moderate- and vigorous-intensity exercise was defined. Plasma CRP concentrations were measured during pregnancy.

Results:

In adjusted linear regression models, mean CRP concentration was 1.0% lower [95% CI = –1.9% to 0.2%] with each 1 MET-hr/week of total recreational exercise before pregnancy. In addition, vigorous-intensity exercise before pregnancy was more strongly related to a reduction in CRP levels than low- or moderate-intensity exercise. However, we observed no association between recreational exercise during pregnancy and plasma CRP levels.

Conclusion:

Recreational exercise before pregnancy, especially vigorous exercise, may reduce the risk of maternal inflammation during pregnancy.

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Mary P. Miles, Erin E. Walker, Stephen B. Conant, Shelly P. Hogan and Jessy R. Kidd

Attenuation of exercise-induced interleukin-6 (IL-6) responses by carbohydrate (CHO) has been demonstrated in studies comparing controlled doses (≥ 0.9 g · kg−1 · h−1) to placebo, but not in studies of voluntary intake. This study sought to determine if attenuation of the IL-6 response during a 32.2-km mountain trail race occurs for high compared to low ad libitum CHO intakes. IL-6, C-reactive protein (CRP), and creatine kinase activity (CK) were analyzed from blood samples collected 12 h pre-, 0, 4, and 24 h post-race. Subjects were grouped into low (n = 14, 0.4 ± 0.1 g · kg−1· h−1) and high (n = 18, 0.8 ± 0.2 g · kg−1 · h−1) CHO intake groups. IL-6 0 h post-race (P < 0.05) was higher in the low (40.2 ± 22.7 pg · mL−1) compared to the high CHO group (32.7 ± 22.1 pg · mL−1). CRP and CK both increased post-race, but no differences were observed between groups. Attenuation of exercise-induced IL-6 is apparent across a range of CHO intakes.

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Clarice Martins, Ismael Freitas Jr., Andréia Pizarro, Luísa Aires, Gustavo Silva, Maria Paula Santos and Jorge Mota

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most frequent complications associated with excess adiposity. Its pathogenesis is complex and there are multiple factors that may contribute to it. AIM: To analyze whether cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), waist circumference (WC), and C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in children with obesity. METHODS: 79 overweight/obese children of both genders, 11–13 year-olds, with abnormal serum ALT from Porto public schools comprised the sample. Measurements included CRF (20-m Shuttle Run Test), WC (NHANES protocol), CRP and ALT (Cholestech LDX analyzer). Logistic regression adjusted for gender, maturation, and weight with ALT levels as dependent variable (risk vs. non risk), and WC (risk vs. non risk), CRP (risk vs. non risk), and CRF (fit vs. unfit) as independent variables. Level of significance was set at 95%. RESULTS: Logistic regression showed that obese fit children were less likely to have abnormal ALT values (OR=.031) CONCLUSION: In obese children, higher cardiovascular fitness appears to reduce the chance of decreased liver function.

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Margareta I. Hellgren, Charlotte A. Larsson, Bledar Daka, Max Petzold, Per-Anders Jansson and Ulf Lindblad

Background:

We aimed to explore the association between self-reported leisure time physical activity (LTPA) and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations in men and women with and without impaired glucose tolerance (IGT).

Methods:

In a cross-sectional study, a random sample (n = 2,816) was examined with an oral glucose tolerance test, CRP and information about LTPA. Those with IGT or normal glucose tolerance (NGT) and CRP value ≤10 mg/L were selected (n = 2,367) for the study.

Results:

An inverse association between LTPA and CRP concentrations was observed in the population (P < .001), though, only in men with IGT (P = .023) and in women with NGT. Men with IGT, reporting slight physical activity up to 4 hours a week presented significantly higher CRP concentrations than normoglycemic men (∆0.6 mg/L, P = .004). However, this difference could not be found in men with IGT reporting more intense physical activity (∆0.01 mg/L, P = .944).

Conclusions:

Physical inactivity seems to have greater inflammatory consequences for men (vs. women) with IGT. More importantly, although 4 hours of physical activity per week is more than the usual minimum recommendation, an even greater intensity of LTPA appears to be required to limit subclinical inflammation in men with IGT.