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Danielle K. Smith and Jonathan Casper

their respective corporate social responsibility (CSR) arms during COVID-19. Specifically, it will analyze and discuss three areas of sport communication: the role that CSR plays during crisis communication, how U.S. sport league CSR programs reacted and structured their CSR communications, and how fans

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Stefan Walzel, Jonathan Robertson, and Christos Anagnostopoulos

Over the last four decades, the notion of corporate social responsibility (CSR) has attracted considerable interest in both scholarship and practice ( Aguinis & Glavas, 2012 ). In the field of sports, the application of socially responsible programs has gained momentum over the past decade or so

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Cindy Lee, Hyejin Bang, and David J. Shonk

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is notably prevalent in the corporate world. The CSR is defined as actions that appear to contribute to a social good that extends beyond the financial interests of their company and are not required by law ( Kim et al., 2017 ). The premise of CSR is grounded

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Yuhei Inoue, Aubrey Kent, and Seoki Lee

Despite the acknowledged importance of investigating the link between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate financial performance (CFP) within a single industry, very few studies have examined this relationship in the context of the sport industry. Using charitable giving data as a proxy of CSR, this study investigated if CSR would affect CFP of professional sport teams within the four major U.S. leagues. Although the positive CSR-CFP relationship was hypothesized based on instrumental stakeholder theory, CSR was found to have non-positive effects on CFP. These results are still notable since they may highlight the importance of the connectedness between CSR and team operations and the awareness of CSR activity among stakeholders in leveraging CSR benefits. Overall, through the use of improved methodology, the current study furthers the understanding of the CSR-CFP relationship among the U.S. professional teams.

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Samuel López-Carril and Christos Anagnostopoulos

Sport’s social and commercial values are indisputable, as is its communicative power. Common denominators and facilitators for these values within the organizational field of sport seem to be the ever-increasing practice of corporate social responsibility (CSR; Kolyperas, Anagnostopoulos, Chadwick

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Dimitrios Kolyperas, Christos Anagnostopoulos, Simon Chadwick, and Leigh Sparks

Despite the increasing number and significance of charitable foundations in various business sectors, their role in cocreating corporate social responsibility (CSR) value remains unclear. This paper identifies CSR value cocreation in professional team sport organizations (PTSOs) and answers three key research questions: (a) Why have PTSOs developed charitable foundations as their means toward CSR value cocreation? (b) What CSR-related resources do PTSOs and their charitable foundations integrate? and (c) How do they manage, share, and transfer such resources to cocreate CSR value? Drawing theoretical insights from service dominant logic and consumer culture theory—and using empirical data from 47 semistructured interviews of UK-based professional football (soccer) clubs—this study develops a communicating vessels framework to illustrate the role of charitable foundations in the CSR value cocreation process. Through four tentative CSR value cocreation levels of relationship (bolt-on, cooperative, controlled, and strategic) the study suggests several internal strategies that can enhance the level of collaboration between founders and foundations. These include information sharing through customer relationship management (CRM) systems and social media platforms; staff sharing or flexible movement across the organizations; quality assurance agreements; flexible team cooperation; partnership protocols with social, media, cultural, and commercial stakeholders; and cotraining of personnel.

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Cleo Schyvinck, Kathy Babiak, Bram Constandt, and Annick Willem

Professional sport organizations are increasingly expected to behave in a socially responsible manner, and research has acknowledged the role of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in professional sport organizations to positively impact the organization, its stakeholders, and society at large

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Eva Piatrikova, Nicholas J. Willsmer, Ana C. Sousa, Javier T. Gonzalez, and Sean Williams

training. To extend the utility of the CS concept, Dekerle 8 postulated critical stroke rate (CSR) as a biomechanical surrogate of the CS, which represents the highest stroke rate (SR) that can be maintained for an extended period of time and swimmers spontaneously adopt when swimming at CS 8 , 9 ; this

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Noh Zulfikri, Victor S. Selvanayagam, and Ashril Yusof

all tests. Data and Statistical Analyses For normalized peak torque, absolute peak torque was divided by the participant’s body weight. In addition to IR and ER strength values, Conventional Strength Ratio (CSR: ERcon/IRcon); Dynamic Control Ratio (DCR: ERecc/IRcon); and bilateral deficit [(Dominant

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Joon Kyoung Kim, Holly K. Ott, Kevin Hull, and Minhee Choi

This study examined the impact of exposure to corporate social responsibility (CSR) messages on individuals’ attitudes and behavioral intentions toward a Major League Baseball (MLB) team’s CSR efforts. Using a 2 (information source: team source or a third-party source) × 2 (CSR initiatives: efforts to help cancer patients or military appreciation recognition) with two nonfactorial control conditions (team source or a third-party source) experimental design, this study aims to identify how factors such as information source, perceived sincerity, and different types of CSR activities impact a MLB team’s CSR messaging on social media. Path analysis was used to examine significant paths between variables; results indicated that CSR messages generated a halo effect, thus providing implications for how MLB teams should develop CSR strategies and most effectively communicate about these efforts. Theoretical and practical implications of study results are discussed.