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Maria Priscila Wermelinger Ávila, Jimilly Caputo Corrêa, Alessandra Lamas Granero Lucchetti, and Giancarlo Lucchetti

Júnior, 2008 ; Lawton & Brody, 1970 ); International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ)–short form ( Marshall & Bauman, 2001 ; Matsudo et al., 2001 ); Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS 21) ( Vignola & Tucci, 2014 ); Psychological Resilience Scale (RS25) ( Perim, Dias, Corte-Real, Andrade

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Daniel F. Gucciardi and Martin I. Jones

The purposes of the current study were to identify mental toughness profiles in adolescent cricketers and examine differences between these profiles on developmental assets and negative emotional states. A sample of 226 community cricketers (125 New Zealanders and 101 Australians; male n = 210) aged between 10 and 18 years (M age = 14.41 years; SD = 2.11) completed a multisection, online survey containing measures of mental toughness, developmental assets, and negative emotional states. The results of hierarchical (Ward’s method) and nonhierarchical (k means) cluster analyses revealed three mental toughness profiles characterized by low, moderate, and high levels of all five mental toughness assets (i.e., affective intelligence, desire to achieve, self-belief, attentional control, resilience). Those cricketers with high levels of mental toughness reported possession of more developmental assets and lower levels of negative emotional states when compared with cricketers with the moderate levels of mental toughness. No statistically significant differences existed between the moderate and low levels of mental toughness profiles. These findings provided preliminary evidence to suggest that mental toughness might be viewed not only from the traditional view of optimal performance but also from a stance that may represent a contextually salient representation of thriving in youth sport settings.

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Shona L. Halson, Renee N. Appaneal, Marijke Welvaert, Nirav Maniar, and Michael K. Drew

is a 21-item self-report measure comprised of 3 subscales, including negative mood (ie, depression and anxiety) and stress states. 18 The DASS-21 has been validated in a sport context for use with athletes. 20 The DASS-depression scale assesses dysphoria, hopelessness, devaluation of life, self

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Victoria Sanborn, Lauren Todd, Hanna Schmetzer, Nasha Manitkul-Davis, John Updegraff, and John Gunstad

of 9 showing 90% sensitivity and 85% specificity in distinguishing persons with or without dysfunctional anxiety ( Lee, 2020 ). A copy of the scale can be readily accessed at no charge ( Lee, 2020 ). The Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21) is a 21-item instrument that assesses self

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Maria Priscila Wermelinger Ávila, Jimilly Caputo Corrêa, Alessandra Lamas Granero Lucchetti, and Giancarlo Lucchetti

) Variables 2015 2017 Respondents on both surveys ( n  = 291) Mean SD Mean SD p DASS21—depression 1.86 2.38 1.95 3.43 .660 DASS21—anxiety 2.01 2.61 1.87 2.80 .410 DASS21—stress 3.59 3.93 3.98 4.56 .151 Lawton and Brody—total 26.02 1.79 25.41 2.65 <.001 Social support 14.81 10.64 14.70 12.99 .874 Total

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Breanna Drew and James Matthews

Depression, anxiety and stress scale (DASS-21) This measure asks individuals to self-report the frequency and severity of the symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress over the previous week ( Lovibond & Lovibond, 1995 ). It comprises 21 items, seven for each of these three sub-scales. For this study, only

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Sarah Edney, Tim Olds, Jillian Ryan, Ronald Plotnikoff, Corneel Vandelanotte, Rachel Curtis, and Carol Maher

further education, and university degree]); weight and height (from which body mass index [BMI] was calculated); the presence of symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress measured using the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21) 52 ; and self-reported weekly MVPA assessed by the Active

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Carol R. Glass, Claire A. Spears, Rokas Perskaudas, and Keith A. Kaufman

/ethnic background, and sport were assessed. In addition, questions included inquiries about past exposure to sport psychology and yoga/mindfulness. Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scales (DASS-21) The DASS-21 ( Lovibond & Lovibond, 1995 ) is a 21-item self-report measure of the severity of depression, anxiety, and

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Jackson M. Howard, Bonnie C. Nicholson, Michael B. Madson, Richard S. Mohn, and Emily Bullock-Yowell

. PSI–PAG 25.15 (4.66) .75 .17 * −.45 ** —       4. DASS-21 10.69 (4.67) .96 −.40 ** .25 ** −.16 * —     5. ABQ 32.02 (11.09) .92 −.43 ** .15 * −.18 * .52 ** —   6. ASICS 660.48 (77.13) .92 .44 ** −.07 .04 −.22 ** −.29 ** — Note. ASICS = Academic Success Inventory for College Students, Total Score

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Andrea S. Hartmann, Florian Steenbergen, Silja Vocks, Dirk Büsch, and Manuel Waldorf

level of negative emotionality, the German-language version of the short form of the DASS was used. The DASS-21 consists of 21 items measuring symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress on three subscales with seven items each. Participants rated items on a scale ranging from 0 (did not apply to me at