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Drue Stapleton

provide valuable information to both healthcare providers and participants to mitigate injury related to dysfunctional movement or movement patterns. The Functional Movement Screen ™ (FMS) is a clinical assessment of abnormal movement patterns and asymmetry while performing seven exercises based on

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Marissa J. Basar, Justin M. Stanek, Daniel D. Dodd and Rebecca L. Begalle

screen (FMS) is commonly utilized to investigate the fundamental movement patterns of individuals. 1 , 3 – 5 , 11 – 17 This screening tool is a ranking and grading system that assesses the quality of fundamental movement patterns, as well as identifying an individual’s limitation or asymmetries along

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Mahsa Jafari, Vahid Zolaktaf and Gholamali Ghasemi

physical dysfunctions exposing people to injury. Second, you need an effective program to train them to overcome such dysfunctions. To achieve these objectives, it is recommended to use functional movement screen (FMS). 4 It determines the mobility and stability deficits, caused by asymmetry and

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Brittany R. Crosby, Justin M. Stanek, Daniel J. Dodd and Rebecca L. Begalle

joint stability and mobility, is the Functional Movement Screen ® (FMS). The FMS was developed to assess functional movement insufficiencies and asymmetries in a healthy population. 1 – 3 Insufficiencies may cause the individual to alter a task to maintain performance, which, over time, can load the

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Natalie J. Lander, Lisa Hanna, Helen Brown, Amanda Telford, Philip J. Morgan, Jo Salmon and Lisa M. Barnett

Purpose:

Competence in fundamental movement skills (FMSs) is positively associated with physical activity, fitness, and healthy weight status. However, adolescent girls exhibit very low levels of fundamental movement skill (FMS) proficiency.

Method:

In the current study, interviews were carried out with physical education teachers to investigate their perspectives of: (i) the importance and relevance of teaching FMSs to Year 7 girls, and (ii) the factors influencing effective FMS instruction.

Results:

There were two major findings in the data: Year 7 was perceived to be a critical period to instruct girls in FMSs; and current teaching practices were perceived to be suboptimal for effective FMS instruction.

Conclusion:

Apparent deficits in current FMS teaching practice may be improved with more comprehensive teacher training (both during physical education teacher education (PETE) and in in-service professional development) in pedagogical strategies, curriculum interpretation, and meaningful assessment.

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Meghan Warren, Craig A. Smith and Nicole J. Chimera

Context:

The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) evaluates performance in 7 fundamental movement patterns using a 4-point scale. Previous studies have reported increased injury risk with a composite score (CS) of 14/21 or less; these studies were limited to specific sports and injury definition.

Objective:

To examine the association between FMS CS and movement pattern scores and acute noncontact and overuse musculoskeletal injuries in division I college athletes. An exploratory objective was to assess the association between injury and FMS movement pattern asymmetry.

Design:

Prospective cohort.

Setting:

College athletic facilities.

Participants:

167 injury-free, college basketball, football, volleyball, cross country, track and field, swimming/diving, soccer, golf, and tennis athletes (males = 89).

Intervention:

The FMS was administered during preparticipation examination.

Main Outcome Measure:

Noncontact or overuse injuries that required intervention from the athletic trainer during the sport season.

Results:

FMS CS was not different between those injured (n = 74; 14.3 ± 2.5) and those not (14.1 ± 2.4; P = .57). No point on the ROC curve maximized sensitivity and specificity; therefore previously published cut-point was used for analysis with injury (≤14 [n = 92]). After adjustment, no statistically significant association between FMS CS and injury (odds ratio [OR] = 1.01, 95% CI 0.53–1.91) existed. Lunge was the only movement pattern that was associated with injury; those scoring 2 were less likely to have an injury vs those who scored 3 (OR = 0.21, 95% CI 0.08–0.59). There was also no association between FMS movement pattern asymmetry and injury.

Conclusion:

FMS CS, movement patterns, and asymmetry were poor predictors of noncontact and overuse injury in this cohort of division I athletes.

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Lisa M. Stobierski, Shirleeah D. Fayson, Lindsay M. Minthorn, Tamara C. Valovich McLeod and Cailee E. Welch

Clinical Scenario:

Injuries are inevitable in the physically active population. As a part of preventive medicine, health care professionals often seek clinical tools that can be used in real time to identify factors that may predispose individuals to these injuries. The Functional Movement Screen (FMS), a clinical tool consisting of 7 individual tasks, has been reported as useful in identifying individuals in various populations that may be susceptible to musculoskeletal injuries. If factors that may predispose physically active individuals to injury could be identified before participation, clinicians may be able to develop a training plan based on FMS scores, which could potentially decrease the likelihood of injury and overall time missed from physical activities. However, in order for a screening tool to be used clinically, it must demonstrate acceptable reliability.

Focused Clinical Question:

Are clinicians reliable at scoring the FMS, in real time, to assess movement patterns of physically active individuals?

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Constantine P. Nicolozakes, Daniel K. Schneider, Benjamin D. Roewer, James R. Borchers and Timothy E. Hewett

accurately predict football-related injuries are an important step toward identifying factors that may reduce injury risk. The functional movement screen (FMS™) is a screening method that was developed to identify movement asymmetries and deficiencies using fundamental exercises to assess the whole

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Alex T. Strauss, Austin J. Parr, Daniel J. Desmond, Ashmel T. Vargas and Russell T. Baker

screens in physically active populations. 9 – 12 The Functional Movement Screen (FMS ™ ) is a screening system designed to assess stability and mobility within full-body movements while identifying movement asymmetries and evaluating overall movement quality. 8 , 13 The FMS ™ may be used as a general

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Wei-Cheng Chao, Jui-Chi Shih, Kuan-Chung Chen, Ching-Lin Wu, Nai-Yuan Wu and Chien-Sheng Lo

after ACLR only averaged around 60% and only 40% for return to competitive sports. 4 Therefore, a prompt and effective rehabilitation for ACL injury deserves much attention. Functional movement screen (FMS) is a comprehensive assessment of 7 different fundamental movements to evaluate human functional