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Sinéad O’Keeffe, Niamh Ní Chéilleachair and Siobhán O’Connor

The Gaelic Athletic Association plays an important role in the physical activity practices of Irish society, with Gaelic football recognized as the most popular club sport for adolescent males. 1 Gaelic football is a high-intensity, high-velocity contact game that requires large volumes of

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Cathal Cassidy, Kieran Collins and Marcus Shortall

Gaelic football is a team-based invasion field sport indigenous to Ireland ( Reilly et al., 2015 ). It represents the most popular of the Gaelic games governed by the Gaelic Athletic Association ( Beasley, 2015 ). The elite Gaelic football season consists of competitions played between January and

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Siobhán O’Connor, Noel McCaffrey, Enda F. Whyte, Michael Fop, Brendan Murphy and Kieran A. Moran

Gaelic football and hurling (collectively known as Gaelic games) are high-intensity multidirectional field games 1 primarily played in Ireland. Gaelic football is considered similar to Australian football; however, it is played with a round ball. 2 Hurling, however, is similar to lacrosse, shinty

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Paul Kinnerk, Stephen Harvey, Philip Kearney, Ciaran MacDonncha and Mark Lyons

pre to peak season ( Hall et al., 2016 ). O’Connor et al. ( 2018 ) acknowledged not examining pre-season coaching sessions as a limitation in their study of Australian soccer coaches’ practice and highlighted this as an area for future work. Gaelic football, which is governed by the Gaelic Athletic

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Pamela Jane Magee, Alison M. Gallagher and Jacqueline M. McCormack

Although dehydration of ≥ 2% body weight (BW) loss significantly impairs endurance performance, dehydration remains prevalent among athletes and may be owing to a lack of knowledge in relation to fluid requirements. The aim of this study was to assess the hydration status of university/club level athletes (n = 430) from a range of sports/activities (army officer cadet training; bootcamp training; cycling; Gaelic Athletic Association camogie, football and hurling; golf; hockey; netball; rugby; running (sprinting and endurance); Shotokan karate and soccer) immediately before and after training/competition and to assess their nutritional knowledge. Urine specific gravity (USG) was measured immediately before and after exercise and BW loss during exercise was assessed. Nutritional knowledge was assessed using a validated questionnaire. 31.9% of athletes commenced exercise in a dehydrated state (USG >1.020) with 43.6% of participants dehydrated posttraining/competition. Dehydration was particularly prevalent (>40% of cohort) among karateka, female netball players, army officer cadets, and golfers. Golfers that commenced a competitive 18 hole round dehydrated took a significantly higher number of strokes to complete the round in comparison with their euhydrated counterparts (79.5 ± 2.1 vs. 75.7 ± 3.9 strokes, p = .049). Nutritional knowledge was poor among participants (median total score [IQR]; 52.9% [46.0, 59.8]), albeit athletes who were euhydrated at the start of exercise had a higher overall score in comparison with dehydrated athletes (55.2% vs. 50.6%, p = .001). Findings from the current study, therefore, have significant implications for the education of athletes in relation to their individual fluid requirements around exercise.

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Kevin J. Beasley

Gaelic football is the second most popular team sport in Ireland in terms of participation. However, very little research exists on the nutritional considerations for elite male Gaelic footballers. Gaelic football is an intermittent type field game played by two teams of fifteen players. Although amateurs, elite players may train and compete 4–5 times per week and may play for several teams. Research suggests that elite footballers are similar anthropometrically and in fitness to professional soccer players. Work-rate analysis shows that footballers experience longer durations of high-intensity (HI) activity (5–7s) and shorter rest durations than soccer players. Recent data suggests that half-forward/backs perform a greater amount of HI work during games than players in other positions. Fatigue is apparent between the first and second halves and the first and fourth quarters. The limited amount of nutritional studies conducted implies that footballers may be deficient in energy intake and may be at the lower end of recommended carbohydrate intakes to support training. A wide variety of sweat rates have been measured during training, demonstrating the importance of individual hydration strategies. Ergogenic aids such as creatine and caffeine may prove beneficial to performance, although data are extrapolated from other sports. Due to the lack of research in Gaelic football, further population specific studies are required. Future areas of research on the impact of nutrition on Gaelic football performance are examined. In particular, the creation of a test protocol mimicking the activity patterns and intensity of a Gaelic football game is warranted.

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Orlagh Farmer, Donna Duffy, Kevin Cahill, Diarmuid Lester, Sarahjane Belton and Wesley O’Brien

’s PA in an Irish OYS context. Such a context includes the Gaelic4Girls program: an emerging intervention strategy. Furthermore, it is not yet fully understood how OYS in female youth could be optimized to facilitate continued participation and increased PA, specifically in a female sport context such

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Sue Reeves and Kieran Collins

The aim of this study was to investigate the dietary intakes and anthropometric profiles of county and club Gaelic football players and compare them to soccer players and control subjects. Seven-day dietary records were analyzed and anthropometric measurements were taken midway through the Gaelic football competitive season. The county group with a mean height of 1.82 ± 0.04 m were significantly taller (p < .05) and had less body fat than any other group. The county and club teams consumed 151 ± 11 and 150 ± 16 kJ · kg−1 · day−1, respectively, with 52.2 ± 5% and 49.5 ± 9% of their energy intakes as carbohydrate. This compares to 173 ± 11 kJ · kg−1 · day−1 for the soccer players and 159 ± 8 kJ · kg−1 · day−1 for the controls, with 57 ± 4% and 44.9 ± 5% of their energy from carbohydrate. The nature of Gaelic football demands a balanced diet, rich in energy and carbohydrate and with adequate calcium is consumed; the subjects needed to increase these dietary components in order to meet the energetic demands of competition and training. Additional nutritional counseling was provided on an individual basis.

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Paul Darby

This article draws on the concept of transnationalism to examine the role and function of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) among Irish migrant communities in the United States. In particular, it examines the role of the GAA in the production and reproduction of shifting notions of Irish national identification in America. The analyses here are rooted in ethnographic research conducted in the US and Ireland and are informed, theoretically, by the work of Basch, Glick-Schiller and Szanton Blanc (1994) and Duany (2002) on transnational identities. The article argues that Irish nationalism, as constructed and articulated in and through the GAA in America, can be considered as a deterritorialized form of identity rather than one that is necessarily limited or constrained by national borders.

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Paul R. Ford and A. Mark Williams

The developmental model of sport participation (DMSP) was proposed by Côté (1999). First, we examined whether the participation profiles of two groups of professional soccer players in Ireland who either had or had not played Gaelic football to an elite level in adolescence provided support for this model. Both groups commenced participation in soccer around 6 years of age and on average participated in two other sports between 6 and 18 years of age, excluding soccer and Gaelic football. A reduction in the number of other sports and an increase in hours devoted to the primary sport were observed between 6 and 18 years of age, as per the predictions of the DMSP. Second, we examined whether players who demonstrated early diversification required fewer soccer-specific hours to achieve expert performance in that sport compared with players who demonstrated less diversification or did not participate in Gaelic football. No significant relationships or differences were reported, which did not provide support for the DMSP, possibly due to the low sample size employed in this study.