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Therese Brovold, Dawn A. Skelton, Hilde Sylliaas, Morten Mowe, and Astrid Bergland

The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship among health-related quality of life (HRQOL), physical fitness, and physical activity in older patients after recent discharge from hospital. One hundred fifteen independent-living older adults (ages 70–92 years) were included. HRQOL (Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form Health Survey), physical activity (Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly), and physical fitness (Senior Fitness Test) were measured 2–4 weeks after discharge. Higher levels of physical activity and physical fitness were correlated with higher self-reported HRQOL. Although cause and effect cannot be determined from this study, the results suggest that a particular focus on the value of physical activity and physical fitness while in hospital and when discharged from hospital may be important to encourage patients to actively preserve independence and HRQOL. It may be especially important to target those with lower levels of physical activity, poorer physical fitness, and multiple comorbidities.

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Eric L. Sauers, Danelle L. Dykstra, R. Curtis Bay, Kellie Huxel Bliven, and Alison R. Snyder

Context:

Throwing-related arm injuries are common in softball pitchers and may lead to diminished health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Arm symptoms such as pain have been reported to be more common in healthy overhead athletes than nonoverhead athletes. Furthermore, more frequent shoulder symptoms and lower shoulder function have been demonstrated in athletes with self-reported history of shoulder injury.

Objective:

To evaluate the relationship between arm injury history, current pain rating, and HRQOL assessed via 2 region-specific patient self-report scales in high school and college softball pitchers.

Design:

Cross-sectional.

Setting:

High school and college athletic training facilities.

Participants:

25 female softball pitchers (10 high school, 15 college; 18 ± 2 y, 169 ± 7.6 cm, 67.5 ± 10.3 kg).

Intervention:

Self-reported arm injury history and rating of current pain and HRQOL were collected during the late season.

Main Outcome Measures:

A self-report questionnaire of arm injury history and current pain rating was used, and HRQOL was assessed via 2 region-specific scales: the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) and the Functional Arm Scale for Throwers© (FAST©). Correlational analysis was used to evaluate the relationships between arm injury history, current pain rating, and the DASH total score and sport module and the FAST total score, pitching module, and subscales.

Results:

A history of arm injury from throwing was reported by 64% of participants, 31% of whom had to cease activity for more than 10 d. The most common site of arm time-loss injury was the shoulder (81%). Mild to severe shoulder pain during the competitive season was reported by 60% of respondents. The DASH and the FAST total scores were significantly correlated (r = .79, P < .001). Respondent rating of shoulder pain correlated significantly with the DASH total (r = .69) and sports module (r = .69) and the FAST total (r = .71), pitching module (r = .65), and pain (r = .73), impairment (r = .76), functional-limitation (r = .79), disability (r = .52), and societal-limitations (r = .46) subscales.

Conclusion:

History of arm injury is common in female high school and college softball pitchers. Severe injury and elevated pain are associated with lower HRQOL that extends beyond the playing field.

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Rochelle Eime, Jack Harvey, and Warren Payne

Background:

To examine the dose-response relationship between health related quality of life (HRQoL) and life satisfaction (outcomes) and duration of recreational physical activity (exposure). Further, to explore whether these relationships depend on type of physical activity (PA).

Methods:

793 Australian rural-living women self-reported on duration of recreational PA; HRQoL via SF-36 Mental Component Summary (MCS) and Physical Component Summary (PCS); and a life satisfaction scale. ANOVAs and ANCOVAs investigated differences in outcomes (MCS, PCS, and life satisfaction) between tertiles of exposure to recreational PA, and types of PA (club sport, gymnasium, walking), with adjustment for potential confounders.

Results:

A significant positive dose-response relationship was found between PCS and level of PA. Furthermore, this relationship depended on type of PA, with club-sport participants recording higher PCS than non-club-sport participants in all but the highest tertile of exposure. Life satisfaction and MCS were not significantly related to level of PA.

Conclusion:

Physical health was positively associated with level of recreational PA, with club sport participation contributing greater benefits at low to moderate exposures than participation in gymnasium or walking activities.

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Hosam Alzahrani, Sonia W.M. Cheng, Debra Shirley, Martin Mackey, and Emmanuel Stamatakis

, depression, anxiety, and job dissatisfaction, 4 , 6 , 7 which may lead to deterioration of health-related quality of life (HRQoL). 8 – 10 Health-related quality of life is a useful indicator for the impact of back pain, as it encompasses multiple aspects of an individual’s life relating to their health

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Ashley N. Marshall, Alison R. Snyder Valier, Aubrey Yanda, and Kenneth C. Lam

, there has been an increased interest in understanding how these injuries impact patient outcomes, such as health-related quality of life (HRQOL). This recent attention on HRQOL, particularly in sport rehabilitation, 20 coincides with associated efforts related to clinical outcomes assessment, patient

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Kenneth C. Lam and Jessica G. Markbreiter

than 21 d of missed sport participation). 4 In addition, previous studies have reported that knee injuries often present with short- and long-term deficits related to pain and loss of function, which can negatively impact health-related quality of life (HRQOL). 5 , 6 Health-related quality of life is

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Javier Brazo-Sayavera, Olga López-Torres, Álvaro Martos-Bermúdez, Lorena Rodriguez-Garcia, Marcela González-Gross, and Amelia Guadalupe-Grau

-related quality of life (HRQoL) questionnaires were evaluated. For the CONF measurements, a phone interview was carried out to retrieve information about the PA, disability, and HRQoL questionnaires (see below). The participants signed an informed consent before taking part in the program. The study was in

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Richelle M. Williams, Rachel S. Johnson, Alison R. Snyder Valier, R. Curtis Bay, and Tamara C. Valovich McLeod

A concussion is managed using a multifaceted assessment approach. 1 , 2 Historically, this approach has focused on symptoms, cognition, balance, and oculomotor function 1 , 2 ; however, there has been a recent shift to include measures of mental health and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). 3

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Rachel R. Kleis, Janet E. Simon, Michael Turner, Luzita I. Vela, Abbey C. Thomas, and Phillip A. Gribble

posttraumatic osteoarthritis regardless of a surgical intervention or conservative management. 9 Knee injury/surgery is associated with long-term pain and disability 10 , 25 – 28 and decreased health-related quality of life (HRQoL). HRQoL is a multifaceted outcome that incorporates a patient’s priorities

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Alison R. Snyder Valier, Elizabeth M. Swank, Kenneth C. Lam, Matthew L. Hansen, and Tamara C. Valovich McLeod

Context:

Accurate assessment of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is important for quality patient care. Evaluation of HRQoL typically occurs with patient self-report, but some instruments, such as the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL), allow for proxy reporting. Limited information exists comparing patient and proxy reports of HRQoL after sport-related injury in adolescent athletes.

Objective:

To compare patient ratings and parent-proxy ratings of HRQoL in adolescent athletes who suffer musculoskeletal injuries requiring orthopedic consultation. The authors hypothesized poor agreement between patient and parent-proxy ratings of HRQoL.

Design:

Cross-sectional study.

Setting:

Orthopedic practice.

Patients:

Thirteen adolescent patients with a sport-related musculoskeletal injury requiring orthopedic consultation and 1 of their parents participated.

Interventions:

During the initial visit to the physician’s office, each patient was asked to complete the PedsQL, and the patient’s parent was asked to complete the parent-proxy version of the PedsQL.

Main Outcome Measurements:

The PedsQL is a pediatric generic outcome measure that consists of a total score and 4 subscale scores: physical, emotional, social, and school functioning. Means and standard deviations were calculated for all scores, and comparisons between patient-self report and parent-proxy ratings of HRQoL were made for the PedsQL total score and subscale scores using Pearson product–moment correlations (r).

Results:

Pearson product–moment correlations showed little to fair insignificant relationships between patient self-report and parent-proxy report of the PedsQL for the total score (r = −.1) and all subscales (range r = .1 to .4).

Conclusions:

Our results suggest a lack of agreement between patient and parent-proxy ratings of HRQoL, with patients rating their HRQoL lower than their parent. Patient perception of HRQoL may be more accurate than proxy report, which supports the use of patient-rated HRQoL in patient evaluation. Assessments of HRQoL made by proxies, even those close to the patient, may not represent patient health status.