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Amanda Sonnega, Amanda Leggett, Renee Pepin and Shervin Assari

, using a multilevel modeling (MLM) approach that takes advantage of multiple observations over a long follow-up period, we considered the association between physical activity and insomnia symptoms. We leveraged the rich data resources of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), a national probability

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Tatiana Andreyeva and Roland Sturm

Background:

Physical activity has clear health benefits but there remains uncertainty about how it affects health care costs.

Objective:

To examine how physical activity is associated with changes in health expenditure for a national sample age 54 to 69 y, and estimate how this association varies across people with different chronic diseases and health behaviors.

Methods:

Data were from the Health and Retirement Study, a national longitudinal survey of late middle age Americans.

Results:

Correcting for baseline differences in active and inactive groups, physical activity was associated with reduced health care costs of about 7% over 2 y (or $483 annually).

Conclusions:

Regular physical activity in late middle age may lower health expenditure over time, and the effect is likely to be more pronounced for the obese, smokers, and individuals with some baseline health problems. While substantially large for the health care system, our estimates are much smaller than health-unadjusted comparisons or cross-sectional effects.

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Tuo-Yu Chen and Megan C. Janke

This study examines whether participation in gardening predicts reduced fall risk and performance on balance and gait-speed measures in older adults. Data on adults age 65 and older (N = 3,237) from the Health and Retirement Study and Consumption and Activities Mail Survey were analyzed. Participants who spent 1 hr or more gardening in the past week were defined as gardeners, resulting in a total of 1,585 gardeners and 1,652 nongardeners. Independent t tests, chi square, and regression analyses were conducted to examine the relationship between gardening and health outcomes. Findings indicate that gardeners reported significantly better balance and gait speed and had fewer chronic conditions and functional limitations than nongardeners. Significantly fewer gardeners than nongardeners reported a fall in the past 2 yr. The findings suggest that gardening may be a potential activity to incorporate into future fall-prevention programs.

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Ming Wen, Lifeng Li and Dejun Su

Background:

Physical activity (PA) has been routinely linked to lower all-cause mortality, yet extant research in the United States is primarily based on nonrepresentative samples. Evidence is scant on the relative and independent merits of leisure-time (LTPA) versus non-leisure-time (NLTPA) activities and how the PA-mortality link may vary across racial-ethnic-gender groups.

Methods:

Data were from Health and Retirement Study which began in 1992 collecting data on individuals aged 51–61 years who were subsequently surveyed once every 2 years. The current study assessed group-specific effects of LTPA and NLTPA measured in 1992 on mortality that occurred during the 1992–2008 follow-up period. Cox proportional hazard analyses were performed to examine the PA-mortality link.

Results:

Net of a wide range of controls, both LTPA and NLTPA showed a gradient negative relation with mortality. No gender-PA interaction effects were evident. Some interaction effects of PA with race-ethnicity were found but they were weak and inconsistent. The mortality reduction effects of PA seemed robust across racial-ethnic-gender groups.

Conclusions:

Regardless of personal background, PA is a major health promoting factor and should be encouraged in aging populations. More research is needed to assess relative merits of different types and domains of PA.

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Shirit Kamil-Rosenberg, Mary L. Greaney, Tsivia Hochman and Carol Ewing Garber

). Comorbidity and functional trajectories from midlife to old age: The health and retirement study . The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences , 70 ( 3 ), 332 – 338 . PubMed ID: 25060316 doi:10.1093/gerona/glu113 10.1093/gerona/glu113 25060316 Thompson , W. W. , Zack

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Venurs H.Y. Loh, Jerome N. Rachele, Wendy J. Brown, Fatima Ghani and Gavin Turrell

and Retirement Study . J Aging Health . 2015 ; 27 ( 8 ): 1415 – 1442 . PubMed doi:10.1177/0898264315584328 10.1177/0898264315584328 25953811 56. Nguyen T , Rist P , Glymour M . Are self-reported neighbourhood characteristics associated with onset of functional limitations in older adults

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Enzo Iuliano, Giovanni Fiorilli, Giovanna Aquino, Alfonso Di Costanzo, Giuseppe Calcagno and Alessandra di Cagno

change in subjective memory and memory performance: findings from the health and retirement study . Gerontology, 61 ( 3 ), 232 – 240 . PubMed doi:10.1159/000369010 10.1159/000369010 Iuliano , E. , di Cagno , A. , Aquino , G. , Fiorilli , G. , Mignogna , P. , Calcagno , G. , & Di Costanzo

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Devajyoti Deka

small suburban area, whereas past studies used national data from sources like the Health and Retirement Study or data for specific regions in other parts of the world, an exact comparison between this study and past studies cannot be made. A simplistic comparison of this study with past studies would

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Mary O. Whipple, Erica N. Schorr, Kristine M.C. Talley, Ruth Lindquist, Ulf G. Bronas and Diane Treat-Jacobson

ID: 20453154 doi:10.1177/1545968310364059 10.1177/1545968310364059 Lee , P.G. , Cigolle , C. , & Blaum , C. ( 2009 ). The co-occurrence of chronic diseases and geriatric syndromes: The health and retirement study . Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 57 , 511 – 516 . PubMed ID