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Evelyn B. Kelly, Deborah Parra-Medina, Karin A. Pfeiffer, Marsha Dowda, Terry L. Conway, Larry S. Webber, Jared B. Jobe, Scott Going and Russell R. Pate

Background:

A need exists to better understand multilevel influences on physical activity among diverse samples of girls. This study examined correlates of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) among adolescent girls from different racial/ethnic backgrounds.

Methods:

1,180 6th grade girls (24.5% black, 15.7% Hispanic, and 59.8% white) completed a supervised self-administered questionnaire that measured hypothesized correlates of PA. MVPA data were collected for 6 days using the ActiGraph accelerometer. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to examine correlates of PA in each racial/ethnic group.

Results:

Hispanic girls (n = 185) engaged in 21.7 minutes of MVPA per day, black girls (n = 289) engaged in 19.5 minutes of MVPA per day, and white girls (n = 706) engaged in 22.8 minutes of MVPA per day. Perceived transportation barriers (+; P = .010) were significantly and positively related to MVPA for Hispanic girls. For black girls, Body Mass Index (BMI) (–; P = .005) and social support from friends (+; P = .006) were significant correlates of MVPA. For white girls, BMI (–; P < .001), barriers (–; P = .012), social support from friends (+; P = .010), participation in school sports (+; P = .009), and community sports (+; P = .025) were significant correlates of MVPA. Explained variance ranged from 30% to 35%.

Conclusions:

Correlates of MVPA varied by racial/ethnic groups. Effective interventions in ethnically diverse populations may require culturally tailored strategies.

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Xiangli Gu, Senlin Chen and Xiaoxia Zhang

behavior characterized by an energy expenditure of ≤1.5 METs while in sitting or reclining posture ( Mansoubi et al., 2015 ). Physical inactivity and sedentary behavior are more prevalent among Hispanic children from families with low incomes ( Carson, Hunter, et al., 2016 ; Carson, Kuzik, et al., 2015

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Cindy Lynn Salazar-Collier, Belinda Reininger, Rose Gowen, Arturo Rodriguez and Anna Wilkinson

attendees meeting PA guidelines via CycloBia event engagement. The third aim is to examine the association between prior event attendance and other sociodemographic factors (sex, age, and Hispanic ethnicity), and meeting adequate PA at the event per PA guidelines. Methods Participants and Procedures With

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Lindsey M. Russo, Megan W. Harvey, Penelope Pekow and Lisa Chasan-Taber

cesarean delivery are more likely to deliver subsequent pregnancies via cesarean delivery. 4 Rates of cesarean delivery in the United States increased from 20.7% in 1996 to a peak of 32.9% in 2009 but have recently stabilized among non-Hispanic white women at approximately 30.9%. 5 However, among

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Tsz Lun (Alan) Chu, Tao Zhang, Katherine T. Thomas, Xiaoxia Zhang and Xiangli Gu

As one of the fastest-growing ethnic groups aged under 18 in the United States, Hispanic school-aged children represent 24.4% of the population and are estimated to increase to 33.5% by 2060 ( Colby & Ortman, 2015 ). According to recent national data ( Ogden et al., 2016 ), the obesity and extreme

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Rodney P. Joseph, Kathryn E. Royse and Tanya J. Benitez

combination of moderate to vigorous PA [MVPA] equivalent to the previously mentioned recommendations). 5 Moreover, when examining the PA patterns of Americans by race and gender, African American (AA) and Hispanic women perform lower PA levels than white women and their male counterparts. For example, only

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Timothy J. Bungum, Melva Thompson-Robinson, Sheniz Moonie and Monica A.F. Lounsbery

Background:

Health behaviors of minority populations, including Hispanics, are important from a public health perspective because this subpopulation is growing and health behaviors of this subgroup are understudied. Physical activity is a component of healthy lifestyles and Hispanics have been shown to be less active than are Caucasians. It will be necessary to know correlates of physical activity to enhance the physical activity of this group. Recently, the importance of environmental and cultural factors has been recognized as correlates of physical activity behavior. The purpose of this study was to identify environmental and cultural correlates of physical activity among Hispanic adults.

Methods:

A 52-item telephone survey was employed to assess physical activity and its potential correlates.

Results:

The sample included 175 females and 156 males. Respondent ages ranged from 18 to 82 years (x = 38.39 ± 15.0). Approximately 20% of respondents were assigned to a “higher physical activity” group. Predictors of being in this group were having supportive environments, being acculturated, attending some college, and age.

Conclusions:

Providing environmental supports may be an effective strategy to enhance physical activity levels of adult Hispanics. Older Hispanics, those with lower educational attainments and those of lower acculturation should be targeted for intervention.

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Cheryl Der Ananian, Renae Smith-Ray, Brad Meacham, Amy Shah and Susan Hughes

( Yelin et al., 2007 ) and total national medical expenditures among U.S. adults with arthritis increased by 100 billion from 1997–2005 ( Cisternas et al., 2009 ). As the U.S. population ages, it will become more ethnically diverse. Hispanics are the fastest growing segment of the older adult population

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Gregory Severino, Marcos Sanchez-Gonzalez, Michelle Walters-Edwards, Michael Nordvall, Oksana Chernykh, Jason Adames and Alexei Wong

reported in Hispanics compared to other ethnic groups ( Fryar, Carroll, & Ogden, 2012 ), which in part are attributed to shared environmental risk factors including lower socio-economical status, diet composition, and genetics ( Florez et al., 2009 ; León-Mimila et al., 2013 ). The aforementioned factors

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Emily Lees, Wendell C. Taylor, Joseph T. Hepworth, Karina Feliz, Andrea Cassells and Jonathan N. Tobin

Despite the numerous benefits of physical activity, older adults continue to be more sedentary than their younger counterparts, and sedentary behavior is more prevalent among older racial and ethnic minorities than among Whites. This study used the nominal group technique (NGT) to examine participants’ perceptions of what neighborhood environmental changes would encourage greater physical activity for older African American and Hispanic women. Participants age 50–75 years were recruited from 2 urban community health clinics. Nine NGT sessions (45 participants) were conducted. The women were asked what changes in their neighborhood environment would encourage them to become more physically active. Responses to the research question were tabulated, and qualitative analysis was used to identify themes and categories. Major categories were physical environment changes, safety, and activities/social support. Although the physical environment received the greatest number of points, concerns for personal safety cut across categories. Participants indicated the need for more facilities in which to be active.