Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 18 items for :

Clear All
Restricted access

Erin Calaine Inglis, Danilo Iannetta, Louis Passfield and Juan M. Murias

, the boundary separating tolerable and nontolerable exercise) and is often identified by measures including the maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) or critical power (CP). 3 Although the accuracy for determining this intensity is best obtained in a laboratory setting, this is not always feasible due to cost

Restricted access

Raffy Dotan

The multisession maximal lactate steady-state (MLSS) test is the gold standard for anaerobic threshold (AnT) estimation. However, it is highly impractical, requires high fitness level, and suffers additional shortcomings. Existing single-session AnT-estimating tests are of compromised validity, reliability, and resolution. The presented reverse lactate threshold test (RLT) is a single-session, AnT-estimating test, aimed at avoiding the pitfalls of existing tests. It is based on the novel concept of identifying blood lactate’s maximal appearance-disappearance equilibrium by approaching the AnT from higher, rather than from lower exercise intensities. Rowing, cycling, and running case data (4 recreational and competitive athletes, male and female, aged 17–39 y) are presented. Subjects performed the RLT test and, on a separate session, a single 30-min MLSS-type verification test at the RLT-determined intensity. The RLT and its MLSS verification exhibited exceptional agreement at 0.5% discrepancy or better. The RLT’s training sensitivity was demonstrated by a case of 2.5-mo training regimen following which the RLT’s 15-W improvement was fully MLSS-verified. The RLT’s test-retest reliability was examined in 10 trained and untrained subjects. Test 2 differed from test 1 by only 0.3% with an intraclass correlation of 0.997. The data suggest RLT to accurately and reliably estimate AnT (as represented by MLSS verification) with high resolution and in distinctly different sports and to be sensitive to training adaptations. Compared with MLSS, the single-session RLT is highly practical and its lower fitness requirements make it applicable to athletes and untrained individuals alike. Further research is needed to establish RLT’s validity and accuracy in larger samples.

Restricted access

Pitre C. Bourdon, Sarah M. Woolford and Jonathan D. Buckley

because of differences in the protocols, definitions, assessment techniques, and variables used. The maximal lactate steady state (MLSS), defined as the highest exercise intensity that can be maintained over time without a continual accumulation of [BLa − ], has been widely accepted as the criterion by

Restricted access

Fernando Klitzke Borszcz, Artur Ferreira Tramontin and Vitor Pereira Costa

Maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) is defined as the highest constant intensity of exercise that can be maintained for a longer period without continuous increase in blood lactate concentration ([La − ]), and it is the gold-standard parameter for aerobic evaluation. 1 – 3 MLSS determination is

Restricted access

Erin Calaine Inglis, Danilo Iannetta, Daniel A. Keir and Juan M. Murias

-incremental exercise, and the maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) of constant load exercise. 2 – 4 However, considerable debate persists regarding the physiological equivalence of these exercise landmarks and their interchangeability for identification of the critical intensity. 4 – 8 The correspondence between the

Restricted access

Max Pietrzak and Niels B.J. Vollaard

technique, the modified long sit slump (MLSS), would increase muscle extensibility and stretch tolerance segmentally, extra-segmentally, and contra-laterally. Methodology Study Design A counterbalanced crossover experiment over 2 intervention sessions was utilized, with each intervention session utilizing a

Restricted access

Ralph Beneke, Volker Schwarz, Renate Leithäuser, Matthias Hütler and Serge P. von Duvillard

Maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) corresponds to the prolonged constant workload whereby the kinetics of blood lactate concentration clearly increases from steady state. Different results of MLSS in children may reflect specific test protocols or definitions. Three methods corresponding to lactate time courses during 20 min (MLSS I), 16 min (MLSS II), and 8 min (MLSS III) of constant submaximal workload were intraindividually compared in 10 boys. At MLSS I, lactate, V̇O2peak, heart rate, and workload were higher (p < .05) than at MLSS II and at MLSS III. The differences between MLSS I, MLSS II, and MLSS III reflect insufficient contribution to lactate kinetics by testing procedures, strongly depending on the lactate time courses during the initial 10 min of constant workload. Previously published divergent results of MLSS in children seem to reflect a methodological effect more than a metabolic change.

Restricted access

Ralph Beneke, Hermann Heck, Helge Hebestreit and Renate M Leithäuser

The value of blood lactate concentration (BLC) measured during incremental load tests in predicting maximal lactate-steady-state (MLSS) workload has rarely been investigated in children. In 17 children and 18 adults MLSS was 4.1 ± 0.9mmol 1.1. Workload at BLC of 3.0mmol 1.1 determined during an incremental load test explained about 80% of the variance (p < .001) and best predicted MLSS workload independent of age. This was despite the increase in power per time related to maximum incremental load test power being higher (p < .001) in children than in adults. The BLC response to given exercise intensities is faster in children without affecting MLSS.

Restricted access

Ralph Beneke and Renate M. Leithäuser

The maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) depicts the highest blood lactate concentration (BLC) that can be maintained over time without a continual accumulation at constant prolonged workload. In cycling, no difference in the MLSS was combined with lower power output related to peak workload (IMLSS) at 100 than at 50 rpm. MLSS coincides with a respiratory exchange ratio (RER) close to 1. Recently, at incremental exercise, an RER of 1 was found at similar workload and similar intensity but higher BLC at 100 than at 50 rpm. Therefore, the authors reassessed a potential effect of cycling cadences on the MLSS and tested the hypothesis that the MLSS would be higher at 105 than at 60 rpm with no difference in IMLSS in a between-subjects design (n = 16, age 25.1 ± 1.9 y, height 178.4 ± 6.5 cm, body mass 70.3 ± 6.5 kg vs n = 16, 23.6 ± 3.0 y, 181.4 ± 5.6 cm, 72.5 ± 6.2 kg; study I) and confirmed these findings in a within-subject design (n = 12, 25.3 ± 2.1 y, 175.9 ± 7.7 cm, 67.8 ± 8.9 kg; study II). In study I, the MLSS was lower at 60 than at 105 rpm (4.3 ± 0.7 vs 5.4 ± 1.0 mmol/L; P = .003) with no difference in IMLSS (68.7% ± 5.3% vs 71.8% ± 5.9%). Study II confirmed these findings on MLSS (3.4 ± 0.8 vs 4.5 ± 1.0 mmol/L; P = .001) and IMLSS (65.0% ± 6.8% vs 63.5% ± 6.3%; P = .421). The higher MLSS at 105 than at 60 rpm combined with an invariance of IMLSS and RER close to 1 at MLSS supports the hypothesis that higher cadences can induce a preservation of carbohydrates at given BLC levels during low-intensity, high-volume training sessions.

Restricted access

Ralph Beneke, Renate M. Leithäuser and Oliver Ochentel

A link between lactate and muscular exercise was seen already more than 200 years ago. The blood lactate concentration (BLC) is sensitive to changes in exercise intensity and duration. Multiple BLC threshold concepts define different points on the BLC power curve during various tests with increasing power (INCP). The INCP test results are affected by the increase in power over time. The maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) is measured during a series of prolonged constant power (CP) tests. It detects the highest aerobic power without metabolic energy from continuing net lactate production, which is usually sustainable for 30 to 60 min. BLC threshold and MLSS power are highly correlated with the maximum aerobic power and athletic endurance performance. The idea that training at threshold intensity is particularly effective has no evidence. Three BLC-orientated intensity domains have been established: (1) training up to an intensity at which the BLC clearly exceeds resting BLC, light- and moderate-intensity training focusing on active regeneration or high-volume endurance training (Intensity < Threshold); (2) heavy endurance training at work rates up to MLSS intensity (Threshold ≤ Intensity ≤ MLSS); and (3) severe exercise intensity training between MLSS and maximum oxygen uptake intensity mostly organized as interval and tempo work (Intensity > MLSS). High-performance endurance athletes combining very high training volume with high aerobic power dedicate 70 to 90% of their training to intensity domain 1 (Intensity < Threshold) in order to keep glycogen homeostasis within sustainable limits.