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Jeremy A. Steeves, Catrine Tudor-Locke, Rachel A. Murphy, George A. King, Eugene C. Fitzhugh, David R. Bassett, Dane Van Domelen, John M. Schuna Jr and Tamara B. Harris

physically demanding occupational categories. 12 Neither of these studies used an accelerometer to objectively measure PA. Using accelerometry (ActiGraph model 7164; ActiGraph, Fort Walton Beach, FL) to objectively measure PA data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003–2004, Van

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Heather Hayes Betz, Joey C. Eisenmann, Kelly R. Laurson, Katrina D. DuBose, Mathew J. Reeves, Joseph J. Carlson and Karin A. Pfeiffer

physical activity. Methods Study Design Cross-sectional data from the 2003–2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) ( 30 ) were used in this secondary data analysis. The NHANES is an ongoing nationally representative population-based survey that assesses the health and nutritional

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Xiaoxia Zhang, Xiangli Gu, Tao Zhang, Priscila Caçola and Jing Wang

Examination Survey (NHANES) National Youth Fitness Survey, which were collected in 2012 by the Division of Health and Nutrition Examination Survey of National Center for Health Statistics. A detailed description of NHANES is available elsewhere ( 25 ). This data set was collected through the use of

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Osarhiemen A. Omwanghe, Devin S. Muntz, Soyang Kwon, Simone Montgomery, Opeyemi Kemiki, Lewis L. Hsu, Alexis A. Thompson and Robert I. Liem

Purpose:

Sickle cell disease (SCD) significantly affects physical functioning. We examined physical activity (PA) patterns in children with SCD versus a national sample and factors associated with PA and participation in physical education and organized sports.

Method:

One hundred children with SCD completed a 58-item survey with questions from the 2009–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) Physical Activity Questionnaire and others on physical education and sports, disease impact, and physical functioning.

Results:

Compared with NHANES participants, more children with SCD (67 vs 42%, p < .01) reported doing at least 10 min of moderate-to-vigorous intensity PA (MVPA)/week. Children with SCD also reported spending more days in MVPA (2.3 vs. 1.4 days/week, p < .01). However, fewer reported spending ³ 60 min/day in either vigorous PA (VPA) (24 vs. 43%, p = .01) or MVPA (17 vs 23%, p < .01). In addition, 90% and 48% of children with SCD participated in physical education and sports, respectively. Greater disease impact on PA and physical functioning were associated with lower participation.

Conclusion:

Children with SCD are active at moderate to vigorous intensity for shorter durations. Negative personal beliefs about disease impact and poor physical functioning represent barriers to PA in SCD.

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Michael R. Richardson, Tammie M. Johnson, Peter T. Katzmarzyk, Earl S. Ford, William R. Boyer and James R. Churilla

Background:

Few studies have examined the gender differences between C-reactive protein (CRP) and muscle strengthening activity (MSA).

Methods:

The sample (n = 7533) included U.S. adult (≥20 years of age).participants in the 1999–2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Created categories of MSA participation included no MSA (referent group), some MSA (≥1 to <2 days/week), and meeting the 2008 Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) recommendation (≥2 days/week). The dependent variable was elevated CRP (>3 to 10 mg/L).

Results:

Analysis revealed significantly lower odds of having elevated CRP for women reporting some MSA (OR 0.64; 95% CI 0.44–0.93, P = .0191). Significantly lower odds of men having elevated CRP was observed in those reporting MSA volumes meeting the DHHS recommendation (OR 0.72; 95% CI 0.59–0.88, P = .0019). Following adjustment for waist circumference (WC) these odds remained significant in men but not women.

Conclusions:

These results suggest that WC may mediate the associations between MSA and CRP and this relationship may be stronger in women.

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Kathleen Y. Wolin and Gary G. Bennett

Background:

The interrelations between various physical activity domains have received little empirical attention in the United States. Of particular interest, given the potential applicability to traditionally underserved communities, is the nature of the association between occupational physical activity (OPA) and leisure-time physical activity (LTPA).

Methods:

5448 adult men and women who participated in NHANES 1999–2000 were included in analyses. Linear regression was used to examine the bivariate and multivariable associations of OPA and education with LTPA. Generalized logit models were used to examine the association of education with OPA.

Results:

We found no association between education and LTPA. OPA was significantly positively associated with LTPA (P < .001). The association between OPA and LTPA was not strongest among those with low education and held only for men in gender-stratified analysis. Education was inversely associated with OPA (P < .001) in multivariable analysis.

Conclusions:

Our findings lend preliminary support to the hypothesis that OPA is an important determinant of LTPA, particularly in men. This provides additional support to calls for assessment of OPA, particularly among individuals of low social class.

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Catrine Tudor-Locke, Meghan M. Brashear, Peter T. Katzmarzyk and William D. Johnson

Background:

Analysis of the 2005–2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) accelerometer data provides the descriptive epidemiology of peak 30-minute cadence (defined as the average steps/min recorded for the 30 highest, but not necessarily consecutive, minutes in a day) and peak 1-minute cadence (defined as the steps/min recorded for the highest single minute in a day) by sex, age, and body mass index (BMI).

Methods:

Minute-by-minute step data were rank ordered each day to identify the peak 30-minute and 1-minute cadences for 3522 adults (20+ years of age) with complete sex, age, and BMI data and at least 1 valid day (ie, 10/24 hours of accelerometer wear) of accelerometer data. Peak values were averaged across days within participants by sex, age, and BMI-defined categories.

Results:

U.S. adults average a peak 30-minute cadence of 71.1 (men: 73.7, women: 69.6, P < .0001) steps/min and a peak 1-minute cadence of 100.7 (men: 100.9, women: 100.5, P = .54) steps/min. Both peak cadence indicators displayed significant and consistent declines with age and increasing levels of obesity.

Conclusions:

Peak cadence indicators capture the highest intensity execution of naturally occurring ambulatory activity. Future examination of their relationship with health parameters using cross-sectional, longitudinal, and intervention designs is warranted.

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Meghan K. Edwards and Paul D. Loprinzi

–2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data were used. The NHANES is an ongoing survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention designed to evaluate the health status of US adults through a complex, multistage, stratified, clustered probability design. The design

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Morgan N. Clennin and Russell R. Pate

deprivation index . J Urban Health . 2006 ; 83 ( 6 ): 1041 – 1062 . PubMed ID: 17031568 doi:10.1007/s11524-006-9094-x 28. NHANES National Youth Fitness Survey . NNYFS 2012 Data Documentation, Codebook, and Frequencies. Physical Activity . September 2013 . https://wwwn.cdc.gov/Nchs/Nnyfs/Y_PAQ.htm 29

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Hotaka Maeda, Chris C. Cho, Young Cho and Scott J. Strath

available National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2003 to 2006 were used to conduct this semi-simulation. Age and sample size were included as study conditions. Missing data were artificially created among the participants with 7 days of valid accelerometer data using a donor matched