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Stiliani Ani Chroni, Frank Abrahamsen, Eivind Skille and Liv Hemmestad

Being a national team coach is a demanding, pressuring, and insecure job ( Arnulf, Mathisen, & Hærem, 2012 ; Hill & Sotiriadou, 2016 ). Sports psychology research frequently purports that coaches experience a variety of stressors (e.g.,  Fletcher & Scott, 2010 ; Olusoga, Maynard, Hays, & Butt

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Phil Ferrar, Lillian Hosea, Miles Henson, Nadine Dubina, Guy Krueger, Jamie Staff and Wade Gilbert

The journey to become a Team USA National Team coach or athlete is one that often takes years of practice, dedication, passion and learning, while experiencing the roller coaster of successes and failures along the way. However, there is one thing that is certain: coaches and athletes need each

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Jorge Arede, António Paulo Ferreira, Oliver Gonzalo-Skok and Nuno Leite

identification process. However, research has been focused mostly on club team players, 2 , 5 – 9 and the information that describes national team players and their recruitment/selection process seems to be scarce. At the national team level, the pioneer work of Erčulj et al 10 examined the physical parameters

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Gretchen Kerr, Erin Willson and Ashley Stirling

), and Canada’s national team alpine skiing coach, Bertrand Charest, who sexually abused his female athletes ( Donovan, 2019 ), are some of many examples. Stemming from the child abuse literature, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, physical abuse, and neglect are covered by the term “maltreatment.” Crooks

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Henk Erik Meier and Marcel Leinwather

Research conducted here aims to contribute to the ongoing debate about gender differences in sport spectatorship. While media coverage of sports represents a “gendered experience”, recent research has questioned the explanatory value of anatomical sex for understanding differences in sport consumption. Analyses of TV ratings for German national team football presented here are set out to test the idea that women are more likely to constitute an “armchair” or “fair weather” audience. Even though watching national team football is clearly a male domain and the men’s team is much more popular, female and male audiences for the men’s team respond to the same set of product characteristics, which supports the idea that women follow men in their TV sport consumption. Moreover, results point to gender differences in demand for women’s team matches supporting the idea that it matters how gendered sport is. Suggestions for future research and policy are made.

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Christopher L. Stevenson

Two forms of justice, distributive and procedural, were used to examine athletes’ perceptions of the fairness of selections for national sports teams. Two questions were investigated: whether the athletes perceived the selections to be fair, and whether their perceptions of the fairness of the selection outcomes were related to their perceptions of the fairness of the selection procedures. Data were collected through interviews from all first-year players on six selected national teams. Three procedures were identified by which the teams selected their athletes: “board of selectors,” “national coach,” and “mixed.” The first type of selection process was associated with perceptions of unfairness of both the selection procedures and the outcomes. The second type was perceived to be fair in both its selection procedures and outcomes. The third type, mixed, occupied an intermediate position and the athletes were ambivalent about both its procedures and selection outcomes. It was concluded that the athletes’ perceptions of the fairness of the selection outcomes were indeed related to their perceptions of the fairness of the selection procedures.

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Jeremy M. Sheppard, Tim Gabbett and Russell Borgeaud

Purpose:

This case study evaluated the effect of repeated lateral movement and jumping training on repeated effort ability in a group of national team male volleyball players.

Methods:

Twelve volleyball players were assessed on their volleyball-specific repeated movement and jumping abilities using a volleyball-specific repeated effort test (RET) before and after 12 weeks of training. The athletes performed between 8 and 9 volleyball training sessions per week, with 5 to 6 of these sessions including specific training aimed at improving repeated effort ability. Typically these training sessions involved 8 to 12 repetitions of 2 to 3 block jumps over a 9-m lateral distance (ie, the athletes had to perform jumps and lateral movements, typical of front court play in volleyball). Population-specific repeatability data were used to determine whether any changes that may have occurred in this study were beyond the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) for this testing procedure.

Results:

Improvements in all variables of the RET were observed for each athlete involved in the study, with a small-to-moderate magnitude observed for the mean changes in each variable (Cohen’s d, 0.21 to 0.59). All of the improvements in the results exceeded the MCID.

Conclusions:

These findings demonstrate that the RET is sensitive to training-induced changes. Lateral movement speed and repeated lateral movement speed, as well as jumping and repeated jumping ability are trainable qualities in high-performance volleyball players.

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Anahit Armenakyan, Norm O’Reilly, Louise Heslop, John Nadeau and Irene R. R. Lu

The hosting of a mega–sport event (MSE) has a number of implications for a host country, some positive and some negative. This research explores the influence of the on-field performance of the host country’s national team (NT), in this case for the Olympic Games, on the decision to bid for and potentially host such an MSE. Previous studies have normally focused on residents and international tourists who attend the event, thereby not considering the views of (i) nonresident communities of the host country and (ii) international and domestic spectators. This research responds by investigating the impact of individual associations with the (Olympic) NT through examining the expectations for and perceived performance of the NT on behavioral attitudes of domestic (Canadian) and foreign (American) residents toward the NT itself, the MSE, and the host country, around the 2010 Winter Vancouver Olympic Games.

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Daniel Gould, John Giannini, Vikki Krane and Ken Hodge

The present investigation was designed to develop a profile of the coaching education background and self-perceived coaching education needs of elite U.S. amateur sport coaches. In all, 130 national team, Pan American, and/or Olympic coaches representing more than 30 U.S. Olympic structure sports were surveyed. Results revealed that the coaches were extremely interested in coaching education workshops and seminars, initiating mentor coach programs for potential elite coaches, and participating in a variety of coaching science courses. Few consistent differences were found between the various categories of coaches (individual vs. team sport, open vs. closed sport, experienced vs. inexperienced, male vs. female, and physical education degree vs. non physical education degree) in terms of their coaching education background and needs. Implications for university based coaching education efforts are discussed.

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Fabio Y. Nakamura, Lucas A. Pereira, César C. Cal Abad, Emerson Franchini and Irineu Loturco

Purpose:

To quantify the training loads reported by karate athletes of the Brazilian national team in the week immediately before their participation in the 2015 Pan American Games.

Methods:

Eleven elite karate athletes (7 men and 4 women, 24.42 ± 3.75 y, 1.70 ± 0.09 m, 69.6 ± 13.2 kg) from the Brazilian national team took part in this study. Session rating of perceived exertion (s-RPE) was quantified in all training sessions. Moreover, resting heart-rate variability (HRV), as analyzed through the natural log of the root-mean-square difference of successive normal RR intervals (lnRMSSD), and countermovement-jump (CMJ) performance before and after 8 training sessions were assessed throughout the week. The differences based on magnitudes were calculated comparing pre- and posttraining session, as well as measures performed every morning during the week.

Results:

The weekly s-RPE was 2608.5 ± 431.2 a.u. The lnRMSSD was very likely higher on Monday than on the following days of the week, remaining stable during this period. CMJ height did not change during the week. Almost certain differences were observed in lnRMSSD pre- and posttraining session, while CMJ height did not change.

Conclusions:

The national karate-team athletes did not present signs of fatigue accumulation, as indicated by relatively steady HRV and unchanged CMJ during the week, as planned by the coaches for precompetition technical and tactical refinement.