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Bryan E. Denham

This article addresses how The New York Times, through an investigative series on drug use and catastrophic breakdowns in U.S. horse racing, influenced policy initiatives across a 6-month period. Beginning with the March 25, 2012, exposé “Mangled Horses, Maimed Jockeys,” the article analyzes how the newspaper helped define policy conversations at both the state and national levels. The article also addresses how the Interstate Horseracing Improvement Act of 2011, a fledgling piece of legislation, became what Kingdon described as a “solution in search of a problem” and thus a political lever in policy deliberations. Long recognized for its capacity to influence the content of other news outlets, the article concludes, The New York Times can also play an important role in legislative arenas, informing lawmakers of salient issues, as well as opportunities for substantive and symbolic policy actions.

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Craig Greenham

’s treatment of Pete Rose. At the heart of this research is an examination of how local press coverage, represented mainly by The Cincinnati Post and The Cincinnati Enquirer , differed from out-of-market coverage, represented by The New York Times . This focus demonstrates the degree to which hometown

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Amanda Kastrinos, Rachel Damiani, and Debbie Treise

from the sources ProQuest identified as the U.S. national news core: The New York Times , Los Angeles Times , Wall Street Journal , and Washington Post . An initial 254 articles were examined, and news stories were included in the final sample if they were longer than 500 words and maintained

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Edward M. Kian, John Vincent, and Michael Mondello

This study examined print-media portrayals of women’s and men’s basketball teams, players, and coaches during the 2006 NCAA Division I tournaments. Drawing principally from Gramsci’s hegemony theory and Connell’s theory of gender power relations, we analyzed article narratives published over a 26-day period during spring 2006 in four major media outlets: newspapers, The New York Times and USA Today, and online sport publications, ESPN Internet and CBS SportsLine. A total of 508 articles were coded and analyzed for dominant themes. Six primary themes emerged from the data. Although the data revealed shifts in media representations of gender relations, overall these themes mostly supported Connell’s theory about the gender order.

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John Vincent and Jane Crossman

This study compared how The Globe and Mail and The New York Times covered the Canadian and U.S. women’s and men’s ice hockey teams competing in the 2010 Winter Olympic Games. A content-analysis methodology compared the amount and prominence of coverage devoted to the women’s and men’s teams. Each newspaper provided more coverage of the men’s teams and to its own national teams, particularly in prominent locations. Textual analysis was used to analyze how the gendered themes intersected with national identity in the narratives. Theoretical insight was drawn from Connell’s theory of gender–power relations, Anderson’s concept of the imagined community, and Hobsbawm’s theory of invented traditions. Four themes emerged: the future of hockey at the Winter Olympic Games, postgame celebrations, gendered discourses, and the importance of the gold-medal games. A discussion of each theme is presented.

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John Vincent and Jane Crossman

This study compared the narratives of 3 broadsheet newspapers of selected female and male tennis players competing in the Wimbledon Championships. From Canada, The Globe and Mail; from Great Britain, The Times; and from the United States, The New York Times were examined. Dominant narratives were identified from 161 articles taken from 44 newspaper editions during the 16-day period coinciding with the Wimbledon Championships fortnight. Drawing on Connell’s (1987, 1993, 2005) theory of gender power relations, textual analysis was used to examine the gendered narratives and, where it was applicable, how the gendered narratives intersected with race, age, and nationality. The results revealed that although the gendered narratives were at times complex and contradictory, they were generally consistent with dominant cultural patriarchal ideology and served to reiterate and legitimize the gender order.

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Edward M. Kian and Marie Hardin

This study examined effects of the sex of sports writers on the framing of athletes in print-media coverage of intercollegiate men’s and women’s basketball tournaments. The number of articles by female and male authors and the frames used were analyzed. Descriptors of players, coaches, and both tournaments in articles from CBS SportsLine, ESPN Internet, The New York Times, and USA Today were coded with the authors’ names initially hidden. Results showed that female journalists were more apt to cover women’s basketball, and men predominantly wrote about men’s basketball. The sex of writers also influenced the ways female and male athletes were presented. Male writers were more likely to reinforce gender stereotypes by praising the athleticism of male athletes. In contrast, female writers more often framed female athletes for their athletic prowess. The results suggest that female sports writers can make some difference in framing, but institutional structures minimize their impact.

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Juan Meng and Po-Lin Pan

A limited number of studies have examined the effectiveness of apology techniques in image restoration of athletes involved in sex scandals. This case study used Benoit’s (1995) image-restoration strategies to examine the apology techniques 3 athletes used to negotiate their sex scandals and attempted to encourage further discussion of these techniques. Three athletes’ sex scandals were comparatively analyzed, including those of golfer Tiger Woods, National Football League quarterback Ben Roethlisberger, and the National Basketball Association’s Kobe Bryant. This case study integrated the apology statements made by each athlete and examined sports-news coverage of the scandals from The New York Times, USA Today, and The Washington Post. This case study offers important insights on how these athletes restored their images and handled the crises surrounded their sex scandals.

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Judith Pratt, Kris Grappendorf, Amy Grundvig, and Ginger LeBlanc

All Summer Olympics articles from The New York Times and The Los Angeles Times newspapers were analyzed (August 14–30, 2004). Column inches, placement (front, front of sports page, or inside sports section), focus (male/female star or team), and media regard (number of quotes, speaker) differed by gender. Articles on female athletes were more often placed inside the sports section as opposed to the front pages of the newspaper or the sports section. Articles on male athletes focused on a male star or team; however, articles on female athletes were significantly more likely to focus on the team and not the female star. Men were quoted more than expected based on the number of male athletes. Men were more quoted even in articles focused on female athletes.