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Ben D. Kern, K. Andrew R. Richards, Suzan F. Ayers and Chad M. Killian

; Blankenship & Templin, 2016 ). Despite these challenges, physical education teacher education (PETE) faculty are the face of the PETE program, so their recruitment efforts have the potential to be impactful. Though some initial recommendations are available to bolster PETE enrollments (e.g.,  Bulger, Jones

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Ben D. Kern, Suzan F. Ayers, Chad M. Killian and Amelia Mays Woods

education teacher education (PETE), as legislative acts, external licensure requirements such as edTPA, and accrediting agencies continue to increase and intensify program requirements ( Lewis & Young, 2013 ). These changes increase the demands on preservice teachers and lead some of them to drop out prior

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Suzan F. Ayers and Amelia Mays Woods

study approach across three institutions of higher education ( Bulger, Braga, DiGiacinto, & Jones, 2016 ). Based on this examination, Bulger et al. proffered suggestions to effectively recruit and retain highly qualified physical education teacher education (PETE) candidates around the themes of, “play

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Qiao Zhu, Hejun Shen and Ang Chen

change with the contextual or curricular mandates ( Ennis, 1992 ), those of preservice physical education teachers may experience dramatic shaping and reshaping as their value orientations are being developed during their physical education teacher education training (PETE). Solmon and Ashy ( 1995

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Langston Clark

physical education teacher education (PETE), I also recognize the contributions of “giants” who struggled to be in the profession—those who made it possible for me and other Black scholars to fully enjoy the benefits of our professional status ( Wiggins & Wiggins, 2011 ). These individuals include Lavonia

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Louisa R. Peralta, Claire L. Marvell and Wayne G. Cotton

), it seems that service-learning programs in physical education teacher education (PETE) continue to emerge. Cervantes and Meaney’s ( 2013 ) systematic review examining the service-learning literature in PETE found 23 papers focusing on three common themes: (a) the importance of aligning service

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Kathy C. Graham, Richard C. Hohn, Peter H. Werner and Amelia M. Woods

The purpose of this study was to compare conceptions of teaching of different groups of individuals associated with a university physical education teacher education (PETE) program. These individuals were 6 prospective PETE students, 4 PETE student teachers, and 4 cooperating teachers in the physical education department’s Clinical Model Program. The intent was to assess subjects’ conceptions, values, and beliefs about teaching relative to the seven categories of the knowledge base identified by Shulman (1987). Data were collected through use of a structured interview with frequent probes. Results revealed that teaching conceptions of prospective PETE students differed considerably from those of the other two groups. In addition, conceptions of student teachers and clinical model teachers more closely resembled those aspects emphasized in the teacher education program. Results of this exploratory study suggest questions for future research.

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Suzan F. Ayers and Lynn D. Housner

The current study describes the nature of physical education teacher education (PETE) programs in the United States. Of the 200 institutions of higher education invited to participate, 116 PETE programs completed a comprehensive questionnaire regarding their undergraduate programs (58% response rate). Respondents reported employing an average of 3.84 (SD = 2.80) full-time and 3.07 (SD = 3.52) part-time faculty members, nearly equal in gender (females = 48%), and overly representative of Caucasians (92% of respondents reported employing a faculty of at least 60% Caucasian). First- and second-year field-based teaching experiences were provided by 77% of respondents. A majority (65.8%) of institutions provided student teaching experiences at the elementary and either middle or high school settings. These experiences typically lasted 9 weeks and were supervised by university personnel three times per setting, and 76.3% were conducted exclusively by PETE faculty. Emphasis on specific curricular models was reported by 83% of respondents, 45.3% reported electronic portfolio development as a primary technology experience, and 62% reported coursework as the primary means by which candidates received multicultural experiences.

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Rod Philpot

In the 1990s, New Zealand and Australia rolled out new school physical education curriculums (Ministry of Education, 1999, 2007; Queensland School Curriculum Council, 1999) signaling a significant change in the purpose of physical education in both countries. These uniquely Antipodean1 curriculum documents were underpinned by a socially critical perspective and physical education teacher education (PETE) programs in both countries needed to adapt to prepare teachers who are capable of engaging PE from a socially critical perspective. One way they attempted to do this was to adopt what has variously been labeled critical pedagogy. Critical pedagogies as a label is something of ‘big tent’ (Lather, 1998) and this paper reports on the published attempts to operationalize critical pedagogy and its reported success or otherwise in preparing teachers for the expectations of the socially critical oriented HPE curriculum in both Australian and New Zealand.

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Pete Lindsay and Owen Thomas

The mass media focus on sporting events (Kristiansen, Hanstad, & Roberts, 2011), coupled with the interest in reporting the psychological aspects of sporting performance (Jones, 2005) can place practitioners in stressful situations (Fletcher, Rumbold, Tester, & Coombes, 2011). Concerns over “misrepresentation,” “misquotation,” “misinterpretation,” and being “incorrectly reported or understood” by the media can be at odds with a practitioner’s honest desire to disseminate findings and provide informed commentaries related to the discipline. This article aims to highlight the ethical, professional and personal challenges faced by Pete Lindsay while working as the resident sport psychologist for an international television broadcaster during a World championship sporting event. The autoethnographic account provides a series of reflective fragments that were abstracted from professional development documentation, supervisory meeting records of the time, and the authors recalled reflections of when Pete undertook the role. Practical implications for the training and certification of practitioners in relation to working within the media are considered.