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Neng Wan, Ming Wen, Jessie X. Fan, O. Fahina Tavake-Pasi, Sara McCormick, Kirsten Elliott and Emily Nicolosi

Pacific Islanders (PIs) are among the fastest growing racial/ethnic groups in the United States, reaching a population size of 1.2 million in 2010, an increase of 40% from 2000. 1 Compared with other racial/ethnic groups, PIs suffer from a disproportionately high burden in health conditions such

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Timothy J. Bungum, Merrill Landers, Maria Azzarelli and Sheniz Moonie

Background:

Little is known about correlates of physical activity of Asian and Asian-Pacific Islander Americans (AAPI). Knowledge of these correlates could be useful in promoting physical activity. Purpose: to identify demographic and environmental correlates of physical activity among AAPI.

Methods:

Participants resided in the Las Vegas, Nevada area, and completed a 52-item telephone administered questionnaire that assessed physical activity behavior, environmental supports for physical activity and demographic factors. Environmental factors included the presence of neighborhood sidewalks, park availability, and nearby grocery stores were combined to create the variable “environmental physical activity supports” (EPAS). Neighborhood crime, pleasantness of the neighborhood for walking, and the presence of loose dogs combined to form “neighborhood safety.” Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of physical activity. Potential predictors included age, gender, BMI, employment, educational attainment, neighborhood safety, and EPAS.

Results:

263 respondents completed the survey. With the exception of living near a grocery store, respondents reported residing in neighborhoods that are generally supportive of physical activity. However, EPAS was the sole significant predictor of physical activity behavior (OR = 1.52, CI = 1.06–2.17). Age and educational attainment unexpectedly failed to predict physical activity.

Conclusions:

Supportive physical activity environments associate with physical activity behavior among AAPI.

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Leticia Oseguera, Dan Merson, C. Keith Harrison and Sue Rankin

Black and non-Black peers at PWIs. Still roughly 20% of college athletes identify as a racial group other than Black or White ( NCAA Office of Inclusion, 2016 ). When Latina/o, Asian American, Pacific Islander, or multi-racial groups are included in large data-based studies they are sometimes collapsed

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Karen L. Moy, Robert K. Scragg, Grant McLean and Harriette Carr

Background:

This study validated the short- and long-form New Zealand Physical Activity Questionnaires (NZPAQ-SF and NZPAQ-LF) against heart-rate monitoring (HRM) with individual calibration.

Methods:

A multiethnic sample (N = 180), age 19 to 86 y, underwent HRM for 3 consecutive days while simultaneously completing physical activity (PA) logs.

Results:

Both NZPAQs showed significant (p < .001) correlations to HRM data for brisk walking (r = .27–.43), vigorous-intensity PA (r = .27–.35), and total PA (r = .25; 95% CI, 0.10-0.40), whereas moderate-intensity PA was substantially overreported (mean = 157-199 min). Although the NZPAQ-LF performed better for brisk walking and vigorous-intensity PA, the NZPAQs were strongly correlated (r = .61 and r = .52, respectively, p < .0001). European/Other participants demonstrated the most accurate PA recall of total PA on both NZPAQs (r = .36−.41, p < .01).

Conclusions:

The NZPAQs are acceptable instruments for measuring adult PA levels and produce similar results. Substituting culturally specific examples of PAs on the NZPAQs and their accompanying show cards could potentially improve PA recall for Maori and Pacific people.

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Wilbert M. Leonard II and Jonathan E. Reyman

The present study contributes to and extends the literature on sport and social mobility by refining the computations for the odds of attaining professional athlete status in the U.S. Using 1980 U.S. census data, 1986 and 1987 team rosters, and 1986 lists of money winners, rates for achieving “entry level” professional sport careers were computed for males and females, whites, blacks, Hispanics, Native Americans, and Asian/Pacific Islanders in the sports of football, baseball, basketball, hockey, men’s and women’s golf, men’s and women’s tennis, and auto racing. The methodological contribution of this research is that refined norming variables are employed in the statistical calculations; that is, they are age, race/ethnicity, sport, and sex specific. This inquiry contains the most systematic, extensive, and precise measures for assessing the likelihood of achieving the ultimate in sport upward social mobility—professional athlete status.

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Campbell Thompson and Mark B. Andersen

This case study involves the progression from a cognitive-behavioral, psychological skills training approach with a rugby football player experiencing adjustment and mood disorder to a psychodynamic and interpersonal engagement with the client using themes from Buddhist psychotherapy. The study charts the development of the psychologist’s understanding of his relationships with clients and with his supervisor. We present a study of three people (i.e., the client, the psychologist, the supervisor) and how their stories and interpersonal interactions are interwoven from a Buddhist-psychodynamic perspective. We examine the influences of the dominant White culture on the male psychologist’s perceptions contrasted with the client’s background as a Pacific Islander. In addition, we present a projective test, which was central to the unfolding of this case study, designed for use with athletes. This case study is a confessional tale (Sparkes, 2002) told in the first-person from the psychologist’s viewpoint.

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Kyle Siler

high school zip codes were taken from the 2011–12 American Community Survey. Results Positional Stacking in College Football Of 20,495 Division I players with usable online roster data and pictures, 52.0% are black, 44.2% white, 2.1% Latino and 1.6% Pacific Islander. Division III demographics are

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Sasha A. Fleary, Robin Mehl and Claudio Nigg

Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander (18.7%), with a mean age of 14.76 (SD =0.88). At Y10 (n = 92; Y5 retention rate = 32.5% and Y10 retention rate = 12.1%), the participants were predominantly female (52.2%), Asian (33.7%), or Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander (28.3%), with a mean age of 19.70 years

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Michael C. Harding, Quinn D. Bott and Christopher E. Jonas

Obesity is one of the largest public health challenges facing Hawai‘i today. Mau et al’s 1 systematic assessment of the existing literature demonstrated that Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders have increased prevalence of diabetes, obesity, and other cardiovascular risk factors compared

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Nisha Botchwey, Myron F. Floyd, Keshia Pollack Porter, Carmen L. Cutter, Chad Spoon, Tom L. Schmid, Terry L. Conway, J. Aaron Hipp, Anna J. Kim, M. Renee Umstattd Meyer, Amanda L. Walker, Tina J. Kauh and Jim F. Sallis

In the United States, nearly 1 in 3 young people is overweight or obese. Lower-income toddlers, children, and adolescents in historically underserved populations—African American, American Indian, Latino-Hispanic, and subpopulations of Asian Americans and Pacific Islander cultures—are at highest