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Maliha Naseer, Aneeta Khoso, Sadaf Naqvi and Hira Irfan

Objectives:

To identify sex-based differences in the perception of benefits and barriers toward exercise and to determine the sex- and age-based differences in the level of physical activity (PA) among adult residents of Karachi.

Methods:

Three hundred adult individuals were included in cross sectional survey conducted during July–October 2010. Perception of benefits and barriers to exercise and the level of PA were measured through a questionnaire. Differences in the perception of benefits and barriers of exercise and level of PA were calculated with age and sex strata.

Results:

Women perceived more barriers to exercise than men (P-value < 0.001). In all age strata women have higher ranks for domestic-related physical activity while men have higher ranks for job-related PA. Leisure time PA were significantly lower for females in all age groups. Total PA is also affected by age and socioeconomic status, higher among people having monthly income < 6000 rupees and lower in males > 45 years of age.

Conclusion:

Sex-based differences exists in the level of PA and perception regarding exercise in mega city of Pakistan. There is a need to design programs that influence PA determinants connected to sex to prevent impending epidemic of non communicable diseases.

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Tessa M. Pollard and Cornelia Guell

Background:

We assessed the quality of data on physical activity obtained by recall from Muslim women of South Asian origin, and the feasibility of using accelerometer-based physical activity monitors to provide more objective measures of physical activity in this group.

Methods:

In this largely qualitative study, 22 British Pakistani women were asked to wear accelerometers (the GT1M Actigraph and/or the Sensewear Armband) for 4 days, provided 2 24-hour recalls of activities, and were interviewed about their experiences with the monitors.

Results:

Women reported spending most of their time in housework and childcare, activities which generated the majority of recorded bouts of moderate to vigorous physical activity. However, women had difficulty in recalling the timing, and assessing the intensity, of these usually unstructured activities. A significant minority of accelerometer datasets were incomplete and some women reported either forgetting to wear the acceler-ometer or finding it intrusive.

Conclusions:

Questionnaires are unlikely to provide an accurate assessment of physical activity in this group of women. This suggests that accelerometer data will be preferable. However, collecting sufficient data for large-scale studies using activity monitors in this population will be challenging.

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Lyutha K. Al Subhi, Shekar Bose and Maraim F. Al Ani

Background:

A cross-country profile of physical activity and sedentary behavior is lacking within Eastern Mediterranean region (EMR) counties. The objectives were to examine prevalence of physical activity and sedentary behavior among adolescents of 10 EMR countries, and to describe potential differences in the 2 factors by sex, age, and BMI.

Methods:

A total of 23,562 adolescents were included from 10 EMR counties based on completeness of data (physical activity, sedentary behavior, age, sex, weight and height) from the Global school-based student health survey (GSHS).

Results:

Overall prevalence of physical activity (19%) is low and sedentary behavior is high (29%), with significant differences among counties. Oman had the highest (26%) and Egypt had the lowest (9%) prevalence of active students. Prevalence of sedentary behavior was the highest in United Arab Emirates (40%) and lowest in Pakistan (8%). Physical activity was lower and sedentary behavior was higher among female adolescents. A linear trend was observed between BMI and both physical activity and sedentary behavior; a similar pattern was seen with age.

Conclusions:

There is a need for interventions to increase the prevalence of adolescents meeting physical activity recommendations in the 10 countries. More investigation is required to understand the cultural context of sex and BMI influence on activity patterns.

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Diana Castaneda-Gameros, Sabi Redwood and Janice L. Thompson

Indian, Pakistani, and Bangladeshi origin, report being less likely to meet the recommendations of PA than their White counterparts ( Sprotson & Mindell, 2006 ). Moreover, in order to develop effective interventions to promote PA and consequently decrease the risk for frailty among older migrant women

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Paulette Stevenson

existing conversation about Muslim women’s participation in sports and shift the conversation from sports as development to sports as a lived experience, calling for a more complete picture of Muslim women’s engagement in sports. Samie provides a rich ethnography of British Muslim Pakistani women who play

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Munira Abdulwasi, Meena Bhardwaj, Yuka Nakamura, Maha Zawi, Jennifer Price, Paula Harvey and Ananya Tina Banerjee

Women of South Asian origin make up one of the largest visible minority groups in Canada. 1 , 2 The term South Asian refers to migrants and their descendants from India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, or Sri Lanka. 2 In 2006, 1.26 million people in Canada reported South Asian heritage. 2 The South Asian

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Thomas K. Ewing

guarantee of coaching success (or that ‘fast-tracking’ a star athlete to level 3 is all the formal coach training required). Indeed, some of the best cricket coaches in the world today never played international cricket. For example, Mickey Arthur (South Africa, Australia, Pakistan); Graham Ford (South

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Gustavo Monnerat, Alex S. Maior, Marcio Tannure, Lia K.F.C. Back and Caleb G.M. Santos

in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam; LWK, Luhya in Webuye, Kenya; MSL, Mende in Sierra Leone; MXL, Mexican ancestry in Los Angeles; PEL, Peruvian in Lima, Peru; PJL, Punjabi in Lahore, Pakistan; PUR, Puerto Rican in Puerto Rico; STU, Sri Lankan Tamil in the United Kingdom; TSI, Toscani in Italy; YRI, Yoruba

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Fiona Pelly and Susie Parker Simmons

 Asia Good 4 (4–5) Average 3 (3–4) −2.0 .035  India/Pakistan/Sri Lanka Good 4 (3–5) Poor/average 2.5 (2–3) −1.5 .02  Western Europe Good 4 (4–5) Poor/average 2.5 (2–3) −1.5 .007  Australia/New Zealand Good 4 (3–5) Average 3 (3–4) −1.0 NS  Eastern Europe Average/good 3.5 (3–4) Average 3 (3) −0.5 NS

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Scott R. Brown, Matt Brughelli and Seth Lenetsky

, 1427 – 1432 . PubMed doi:10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181aa1d9f 10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181aa1d9f Ras , J. , & Threethambal , P. ( 2014 ). Injury incidence and balance in Rugby players . Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences, 30 , 1346 – 1350 . PubMed doi:10.12669/pjms.306.5648 Riemann , B.L. , & Davies