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David Cassilo and Danielle Sarver Coombs

On February 4, 2016, the Pakistan Super League (PSL), a professional Twenty20 men’s cricket league, was officially launched with massive public enthusiasm and support of its “cricket-mad” named nation. Despite being headquartered in Lahore, Pakistan, and having “Pakistan” included in its league

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Maliha Naseer, Aneeta Khoso, Sadaf Naqvi and Hira Irfan

Objectives:

To identify sex-based differences in the perception of benefits and barriers toward exercise and to determine the sex- and age-based differences in the level of physical activity (PA) among adult residents of Karachi.

Methods:

Three hundred adult individuals were included in cross sectional survey conducted during July–October 2010. Perception of benefits and barriers to exercise and the level of PA were measured through a questionnaire. Differences in the perception of benefits and barriers of exercise and level of PA were calculated with age and sex strata.

Results:

Women perceived more barriers to exercise than men (P-value < 0.001). In all age strata women have higher ranks for domestic-related physical activity while men have higher ranks for job-related PA. Leisure time PA were significantly lower for females in all age groups. Total PA is also affected by age and socioeconomic status, higher among people having monthly income < 6000 rupees and lower in males > 45 years of age.

Conclusion:

Sex-based differences exists in the level of PA and perception regarding exercise in mega city of Pakistan. There is a need to design programs that influence PA determinants connected to sex to prevent impending epidemic of non communicable diseases.

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Tessa M. Pollard and Cornelia Guell

Background:

We assessed the quality of data on physical activity obtained by recall from Muslim women of South Asian origin, and the feasibility of using accelerometer-based physical activity monitors to provide more objective measures of physical activity in this group.

Methods:

In this largely qualitative study, 22 British Pakistani women were asked to wear accelerometers (the GT1M Actigraph and/or the Sensewear Armband) for 4 days, provided 2 24-hour recalls of activities, and were interviewed about their experiences with the monitors.

Results:

Women reported spending most of their time in housework and childcare, activities which generated the majority of recorded bouts of moderate to vigorous physical activity. However, women had difficulty in recalling the timing, and assessing the intensity, of these usually unstructured activities. A significant minority of accelerometer datasets were incomplete and some women reported either forgetting to wear the acceler-ometer or finding it intrusive.

Conclusions:

Questionnaires are unlikely to provide an accurate assessment of physical activity in this group of women. This suggests that accelerometer data will be preferable. However, collecting sufficient data for large-scale studies using activity monitors in this population will be challenging.

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Lyutha K. Al Subhi, Shekar Bose and Maraim F. Al Ani

Background:

A cross-country profile of physical activity and sedentary behavior is lacking within Eastern Mediterranean region (EMR) counties. The objectives were to examine prevalence of physical activity and sedentary behavior among adolescents of 10 EMR countries, and to describe potential differences in the 2 factors by sex, age, and BMI.

Methods:

A total of 23,562 adolescents were included from 10 EMR counties based on completeness of data (physical activity, sedentary behavior, age, sex, weight and height) from the Global school-based student health survey (GSHS).

Results:

Overall prevalence of physical activity (19%) is low and sedentary behavior is high (29%), with significant differences among counties. Oman had the highest (26%) and Egypt had the lowest (9%) prevalence of active students. Prevalence of sedentary behavior was the highest in United Arab Emirates (40%) and lowest in Pakistan (8%). Physical activity was lower and sedentary behavior was higher among female adolescents. A linear trend was observed between BMI and both physical activity and sedentary behavior; a similar pattern was seen with age.

Conclusions:

There is a need for interventions to increase the prevalence of adolescents meeting physical activity recommendations in the 10 countries. More investigation is required to understand the cultural context of sex and BMI influence on activity patterns.

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1032 1032 1038 1038 10.1123/jpah.10.7.1032 Sex-Based Difference in the Perception of Exercise and Level of Physical Activity Among Residents of Karachi City, Pakistan Maliha Naseer * Aneeta Khoso * Sadaf Naqvi * Hira Irfan * 9 2013 10 10 7 7 1039 1039 1047 1047 10.1123/jpah.10.7.1039 Physical

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Paul J. Collings, Diane Farrar, Joanna Gibson, Jane West, Sally E. Barber and John Wright

subgroup are presented in Table  1 . More than half of women (60.4%) were inactive, one-fifth were somewhat active (18.2%), and fewer were classified as moderately active (12.0%) and active (9.4%), respectively. Inactive women were more frequently of Pakistani origin, multiparous, and were moderately or

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Diana Castaneda-Gameros, Sabi Redwood and Janice L. Thompson

Indian, Pakistani, and Bangladeshi origin, report being less likely to meet the recommendations of PA than their White counterparts ( Sprotson & Mindell, 2006 ). Moreover, in order to develop effective interventions to promote PA and consequently decrease the risk for frailty among older migrant women

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Matthew J. Smith and Oliver R. Runswick

mind, he was not living up to the high standards he had set himself and the problems this created. Similarly, Yardy appeared to be struggling when stepping up from playing county cricket to international cricket. For example, when chosen for a squad to play a one-day series against Pakistan, Yardy

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Keramat Ullah Keramat and Mohammad Naveed Babar

screening shoulder mobility test. A digital inclinometer (clinometer application) installed on a Samsung Note 8 (Samsung Electronics, Pakistan) was used for measuring the shoulder active ROM. The use of a digital inclinometer was validated for measuring the internal and external rotation of Cronbach alpha

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Paulette Stevenson

existing conversation about Muslim women’s participation in sports and shift the conversation from sports as development to sports as a lived experience, calling for a more complete picture of Muslim women’s engagement in sports. Samie provides a rich ethnography of British Muslim Pakistani women who play