Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 26 items for :

  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All
Restricted access

“Don’t Be Stupid, Stupid!” Cognitive-Behavioral Techniques to Reduce Irrational Beliefs and Enhance Focus in a Youth Tennis Player

Richard A. Sille, Martin J. Turner, and Martin R. Eubank

think, feel, and act in stressful situations. This empowers athletes to be in control of their thoughts and to understand how those thoughts affect feelings and behaviors ( Shanmugam & Jowett, 2017 ). Around this time, I read about the application of rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT) to increase

Restricted access

Examining the Effectiveness of a Rational Emotive Personal-Disclosure Mutual-Sharing (REPDMS) Intervention on the Irrational Beliefs and Rational Beliefs of Greek Adolescent Athletes

Evangelos Vertopoulos and Martin J. Turner

The present study examined the effects of a rational emotive personal-disclosure mutual-sharing (REPDMS) intervention on the rational and irrational beliefs of a group of Greek adolescent athletes that had previously participated in four rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT) educational workshops. Measurements were taken before REBT workshops (baseline), during the REBT workshop period, and after the REPDMS session (postintervention). Further, a comparison group received REBT education, but did not receive REPDMS, allowing the between-subjects comparison between participants who received REPDMS and participants who did not. Findings support the hypotheses that REPDMS has positive effects on further reducing irrational beliefs, enhancing rational beliefs, and prolonging the duration of these positive effects, over and above REBT education alone. Qualitative inspection of the REPDMS transcript also revealed participant perceptions of REBT, and served to stimulate critical author reflections on REPDMS.

Restricted access

Developing Performance Using Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT): A Case Study with an Elite Archer

Andrew G. Wood, Jamie B. Barker, and Martin J. Turner

Rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT; Ellis, 1957) is a psychotherapeutic approach receiving increasing interest within sport. REBT is focused on identifying, disputing, and replacing irrational beliefs (IBs) with rational beliefs (RBs) to promote emotional well-being and goal achievement. This study provides a detailed case outlining the application and effect of seven one-to-one REBT sessions with an elite level archer who was experiencing performance-related anxiety, before and during competition. The case also offers an insight into common misconceptions, challenges, and guidance for those who may consider applying REBT within their practice. Data revealed meaningful short and long-term (6-months) reductions in IBs and improvements in RBs, self-efficacy, perception of control and archery performance. The case supports the effective application of REBT as an intervention with athletic performers, promoting lasting changes in an athlete’s ability to manage their cognitions, emotions and behaviors in the pursuit of performance excellence.

Restricted access

The Effects of REBT, and the Use of Credos, on Irrational Beliefs and Resilience Qualities in Athletes

Saqib Deen, Martin James Turner, and Rebecca S.K. Wong

The use of rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT) in sport psychology has received little attention in research to date, but is steadily growing. Therefore, to further add to the building body of research, this study examines the efficacy of REBT (comprising five counseling sessions, and four homework assignments) in decreasing self-reported irrational beliefs, and increasing self-reported resilient qualities in five elite squash players from Malaysia. The study uses a single-case multiple-baseline across-participants design. Visual and graphical analyses revealed that REBT reduced self-reported irrational beliefs significantly in all athletes, and raised self-reported resilient qualities significantly in some athletes. Athlete’s feedback, reflections on the usage of REBT, Athlete Rational Resilience Credos, and the practice of sport psychology across cultures are discussed, along with guidance for the future use of REBT in relevant settings.

Restricted access

A Rational-Emotive-Behavior Therapy Mindfulness Approach to Working Within the Elite Player Performance Plan

Dawn-Marie Armstrong and Martin J. Turner

clients to show them how these can affect their behavior and impact performance and has, therefore, sought to present this case utilizing general (as opposed to specific; see Turner, 2022 , for a full discussion) rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT; Ellis, 1957 ) to explore the story of one, select

Restricted access

The Effects of a Brief Online Rational-Emotive-Behavioral-Therapy Program on Coach Irrational Beliefs and Well-Being

Ryan G. Bailey and Martin J. Turner

stimuli and one’s emotional and behavioral responses. The concept of irrational beliefs emanates from a cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) developed in the 1950s by Albert Ellis called rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT). In line with other transactional theories of stress and emotion (e.g.,  Lazarus

Restricted access

Exploring the Effects of a Single Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy Workshop in Elite Blind Soccer Players

Andrew G. Wood, Jamie B. Barker, Martin Turner, and Peter Thomson

The application of clinical models in elite sport symbolizes a shift in effective interventions that aim to enhance psychological well-being and performance. The effects of rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT; Ellis, 1957 ) on psychological health and athletic performance are receiving

Restricted access

Psychological Distress Across Sport Participation Groups: The Mediating Effects of Secondary Irrational Beliefs on the Relationship Between Primary Irrational Beliefs and Symptoms of Anxiety, Anger, and Depression

Martin J. Turner, Stuart Carrington, and Anthony Miller

distress. One cognitive-behavioural approach that is receiving growing attention in sport and exercise literature (see Turner, 2016 for a review) is rational emotive behaviour therapy (REBT; Ellis, 1957 ). REBT was the first cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) and posits that it is not events that

Restricted access

Using Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy With Athletes

Martin J. Turner and Jamie B. Barker

The use of rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT) in sport psychology has received scant research attention. Therefore, little is known about how REBT can be adopted by sport psychology practitioners. This paper principally outlines how practitioners can use REBT on a one-to-one basis to reduce irrational beliefs in athletes. Guidance is offered on the introduction of REBT to applied contexts, the REBT process through which an athlete is guided, and offers an assessment of the effectiveness of REBT with athletes. It is hoped that this paper will encourage other practitioners to adopt REBT in their work and to report their experiences.

Restricted access

The Sport of Avoiding Sports and Exercise: A Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy Perspective

Albert Ellis

The purpose of this article is to apply the rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT) perspective to motivation to begin and continue regular exercise or sport involvement. A basic premise is that exercise and sports avoidance are usually motivated by low frustration tolerance and/or irrational fears of failing. The treatment of exercise and sports avoidance by REBT is multimodal, integrative, and involves the use of cognitive, emotive, and behavioral methods. Cognitive methods include disputing irrational beliefs, learning rational coping self-statements, referenting, and reframing. Emotive methods include the use of strong dramatic statements, rational emotive imagery, shame-attacking exercises, and role-playing. Various behavioral methods such as anxiety reducing assignments, operant conditioning, paradoxical homework, and stimulus control are explained. REBT focuses on helping exercise and sport avoiders find their inhibitory demands and change the demands into healthy preferences while promoting unconditional self-acceptance.