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Renee L. Polubinsky and Jennifer M. Plos

Weight training is an excellent example of where coaches need to have acquired knowledge and skills in the realms of sports medicine, strength and conditioning, and risk management for safety and injury prevention. There are several exercises and lifting techniques that may increase the risk of shoulder injuries. This article will focus on the prevalence of injuries from weight training, a brief discussion of shoulder anatomy, three of the more common shoulder pathologies, and weight training modifications to assist in the prevention of these shoulder pathologies.

Open access

Lawrence W. Judge, Kimberly J. Bodey, David Bellar, Christine Brooks, and Terry Crawford

In recent years, large scale sport organizations and national governing bodies have produced coaching education programs to prepare coaches to teach and mentor athletes. The purpose of this study was to examine: a) track & field coaches’ familiarity with the National Standards for Sport Coaches, b) the alignment of United States Track & Field (USATF) Developmental, Level I, and Level II coaching education programs with the National Standards for Sport Coaches, and c) the alignment of USATF Developmental, Level I, and Level II coaching education programs with coaches’ perceived needs for subject matter training. A 39-item survey was administered during a USATF certification course to measure coaches’ familiarity and perceptions. The results showed the vast majority of coaches (75.2%) were not familiar with the National Standards. At the time of assessment, the Developmental, Level I, and Level II courses were partially aligned with 25 of 40 standards at the Level 1, Level 3, or Level 5 accreditation levels. The courses were not aligned with 15 of 40 standards at any accreditation level. The majority of deficiencies existed in Domain 2: Safety and Injury Prevention, Domain 7: Organization and Administration, and Domain 8: Evaluation. While the USATF coaching education curriculum is partially aligned with many, but not all, of the national standards, the curriculum appears to contain subject matter training that coaches perceived as needed. Curricular revisions, including future directions of the USATF coaching education program, such as new courses and innovative use of technology, are presented.

Open access

Lindsey E. Eberman, Kimberly J. Bodey, Rebecca Zakrajsek, Madeline McGuire, and Adam Simpson

Background:

The National Standards for Sport Coaches (2006) acknowledges that differences exist in athletes’ ability to tolerate heat. As such, Domain 2: Safety and Injury Prevention (S7-10), Domain 3: Physical Conditioning (S12-13), and Domain 7: Organization and Administration (S34) list expectations for coaches’ ability to recognize and respond to heat illness. However, only the American Red Cross of Greater Indianapolis (Domain 2 specific) and 13 programs are accredited by NCACE. Moreover, on-line trainings frequently used to educate novice interscholastic and recreational sport coaches provide only a cursory review of heat illness precautions, symptoms, and remedies.

Objective:

The purpose of this exploratory study is to identify changes in coaches’ actual and perceived knowledge after an on-line educational intervention, as well as determine whether the educational intervention will decrease the knowledge gap.

Research Design:

A pre-test/post-test design was used to identify the effect of an educational intervention on perceived and actual knowledge of sport coaches.

Participants:

Coaches (n=19; male=14, female=5) were solicited via email made available by the Indiana High School Athletic Association and the Indiana Youth Soccer Association – Olympic Development Program.

Instrumentation:

The Perceived Knowledge Questionnaire (five-item survey) and an actual knowledge assessment (two versions of 19-item quiz) were used to measure the coaches’ perceived and actual knowledge about the prevention, recognition, and treatment of exertional heat illnesses. Participants completed the “Beat the Heat: Be a Better Coach in Extreme Environmental Conditions” educational intervention.

Procedures:

Coaches completed the on-line educational module including pre-test and post-tests evaluations of actual and perceived knowledge.

Statistical Analysis:

Researchers performed three separate paired t-tests to identify the effect of the educational intervention on the dependent variables: actual knowledge, perceived knowledge, and knowledge gap. Significance was set a-prior at p<0.05.

Results:

Participants demonstrated a significant 18.1% improvement (t18=-4.877, p<0.001, ES=0.62) in actual knowledge scores. Perceived knowledge also significantly improved (t18=-2.585, p=0.019, ES=0.25). Knowledge gap, the difference between actual knowledge and perceived knowledge, became significantly smaller (t18=4.850, p<0.001, ES=0.63).

Conclusions:

Results indicate the on-line educational intervention improved actual knowledge, perceived knowledge, and decreased the knowledge gap. Additional large scale study of this intervention is warranted.

Open access

Meera Sreedhara, Karin Valentine Goins, Christine Frisard, Milagros C. Rosal, and Stephenie C. Lemon

mixed use to enhance the diversity and proximity of destinations near public transit. 7 Individuals using public transit often walk or bike to transit stops, and expanding services, locations, and connections can improve access and opportunities for PA. 5 , 8 Traffic safety and injury prevention

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Jay Coakley

promotion and education, safety and injury prevention, nutrition, anatomy, ergonomics, neuroscience, pedagogy, physical education teacher education, physical therapy, rehabilitation, athletic and fitness training, adapted physical activity, and coaching. 4. In 2004, I added an “s” to “sport” in the title of

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José A. Santiago and James R. Morrow Jr.

, exercise prescription (frequency, intensity, duration, mode, and self-evaluation), nutrition, safety and injury prevention, consumer issues, disease prevention, and health promotion ( Corbin, Welk, Corbin, & Welk, 2013 ; Zhu, Safrit, & Cohen, 1999 ). According to Williams, Greene, Satinsky, and Neuberger

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Pete Van Mullem and Kirk Mathias

.99 4.95 2.97 1.98 0.66 0.33  Prevent, educate, and recognize hazing/bullying among the athletes 29.70 25.40 29.70 8.60 4.30 1.00 1.30 0.00  Communicate through written and verbal interaction, an athlete-centered approach to coaching 19.47 29.04 29.04 12.87 7.26 1.32 0.66 0.33 Safety and injury