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Marie Hedberg

The purpose of this article is to describe the status of coaching and coach education in Sweden. The Swedish Sport Movement can be traced to the distinctive cultural and political characteristics that exist in Sweden and in other Scandinavian countries. The typical Swedish coach has been described as a collectivist, having a high work ethic and believing strongly in the importance of the group (Birkinshaw & Crainer, 2002). They build their coaching on what are traditionally considered female values, have a high-risk tolerance and there is often a lack of hierarchy in the coach-athlete relationship. Most coaching is done on a voluntary basis and the different Sport federations design and deliver coach education. There is no standard or uniform coach education regarding content, structure and costs. In addition, the quality of coach education in Sweden has not been assessed. Although many coaches recognize the importance of learning from other coaches, research has found that coaches in Sweden are seldom prepared to reflect and to think critically (Fahlström, Glemne, Hageskog, Kenttä, & Linnér, 2013; Hedberg, 2014).

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investigate the concept of social entrepreneurship in relation to government policies in Sweden. Following a review of the Swedish sport movement and theoretical perspectives on social entrepreneurship, four cases are described, which offer unique insight into the entrepreneurial activities of the focal

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Cecilia Stenling and Michael Sam

. Historically, Swedish sport has benefitted considerably from its monopolistic position, which has included a combination of significant public funding with far-reaching autonomy vis-à-vis government agencies ( Fahlén & Stenling, 2016 ). The past decades have thus seen an increase in central government funding

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Urban Johnson and Mark Andersen

). Halmstad, Sweden : Högskolan i Halmstad . Johnson , U. ( 2006 ). Sport psychology—Past, present and future: The perceptions of Swedish sport psychology students . Athletic Insight, 8 , 1 – 8 . Johnson , U. , Andersson , K. , & Fallby , J. ( 2011 ). Sport psychology consulting among Swedish

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Göran Kenttä, Marte Bentzen, Kristen Dieffenbach and Peter Olusoga

Sciences and head of sport psychology for the Swedish Sport Confederation. He is also an adjunct professor at the School of Human Kinetics at the University of Ottawa. He has attended a number of Olympics and Paralympic Games as a sport psychologist. His research, academic role, and applied practice has a

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Krista Van Slingerland, Natalie Durand-Bush, Poppy DesClouds and Göran Kenttä

Kenttä, the fourth author, is an associate professor of sport psychology in the Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden and the head of sport psychology for the Swedish Sport Confederation. He is also an adjunct professor in the School of Human Kinetics at the University of

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Peter Olusoga, Marte Bentzen and Goran Kentta

Swedish Sport Confederation. He is also an adjunct professor at the School of Human Kinetics at the University of Ottawa. He has attended a number of Olympics and Paralympic Games as a sport psychologist. His research, academic role and applied practice has a strong connection to elite sport and high

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Stiliani Ani Chroni, Frank Abrahamsen, Eivind Skille and Liv Hemmestad

comparison of the situation and the policies in Denmark, Norway and Sweden . Sport in Society, 13 , 657 – 675 . doi:10.1080/17430431003616423 10.1080/17430431003616423 Pensgaard , A.M. ( 2008 ). Consulting under pressure: How to help an athlete deal with unexpected distracters during Olympic Games