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Karen S. Meaney, Ting Liu, and Lara M. Duke

The rapidly increasing enrollment in kinesiology programs recognizes the important role of our academic discipline in promoting future professionals within the physical activity, fitness, wellness, education, sport, and allied health domains. Unprecedented growth in student interest in kinesiology offers faculty and administrators in higher education both exciting opportunities and difficult challenges. One significant concern facing kinesiology faculty is maintaining high-quality instruction within growing class sizes. Incorporating service-learning components within kinesiology curricula provides numerous benefits to students, faculty, institutions of higher education, and members of our local and global communities. In addition, service-learning has the potential to initiate innovative and entrepreneurial learning experiences and funding opportunities for students and faculty.

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Isabel Valdez and Ting Liu

The benefits, barriers, and methodologies of the enhancement of undergraduate research have been widely studied in higher education. However, there are limited studies on undergraduate research in the field of kinesiology. The previous studies centered around student or faculty evaluation of existing curricular or extracurricular undergraduate research programs. The extent to which these studies may inform a kinesiology department that does not have an established undergraduate research curriculum or program is questionable. This article provides a general overview of existing undergraduate research enhancement programs in other universities, presents a recent research study on perceptions of undergraduate research in exercise and sports science students at Texas State University, and offers future recommendations on enhancing undergraduate research in kinesiology.

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Duane Knudson, Ting Liu, Dan Schmidt, and Heather Van Mullem

The scarcity of tenure-track lines in most kinesiology departments supports the need for the implementation of faculty mentoring programs. This article summarizes key elements of mentoring programs for tenure-track kinesiology faculty at 3 kinds of state universities. Mentoring at a bachelor’s college or university might emphasize support to enhance a new faculty member’s teaching effectiveness and student advising strategies and assist new faculty with a positive integration into the campus community. A comprehensive university mentoring approach may place equal emphasis on both formal (e.g., orientation and mentoring committee) and informal (e.g., collegial and self-selected mentoring) interactions. Helping new faculty members understand their role as an important part of the departmental team and organizational mission is a consistent theme. Mentoring at a research-intensive university might emphasize clarifying scholarship, tenure, and promotion expectations relative to support; guidance in portfolio presentation; retention, tenure, and promotion evaluation; and strong communication that promotes mutual professional development and improves or sustains faculty retention.

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Ting Liu, Michelle Hamilton, YuChun Chen, Katie Harris, and Rushali Pandya

Over the past decade, there has been a notable increase in interest in master’s education in the United States. However, not much attention has been paid to recruiting and retaining master’s students in the field of kinesiology. This article describes recruitment and retention strategies that have been successfully implemented in a kinesiology graduate program at a Hispanic-serving institution. Recruiting from undergraduate programs, removing use of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) in graduate admissions, awarding graduate teaching assistantships, creating new programs that flow with the evolving workforce, actively promoting the program at other universities and conferences, and building partnership with other universities are described for recruiting quality master’s students. Establishing a peer/faculty mentorship program and building a strong student network/organization have been shown to have a positive impact on retention. Readers may pick and choose the strategies that work best with the student population, faculty, and other resources available in the program.

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development can be made. Development of Postural Stability in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Yumeng Li; Ting Liu; Elizabeth Venuti, Texas State University Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a group of neurological developmental disorders that typically last throughout an individual’s lifetime

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, Augusta University (Chair) Farid Bardid, University of Strathclyde Jackie Goodway, Ohio State University Ryan Hulteen, Louisiana State University Do Kyeong Lee, CSU – Fullerton Ting Liu, Texas State University Giovanna (Gia) Leone, The Citadel (Student representative) Andy Pitchford, Iowa State University

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, Sensory Processing, and BMI in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Ting Liu, Texas State University It is known that children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD)’s atypical sensory processing pattern affects their ability to sustain and engage in physical activities (Jasmin et al., 2009; Tomchek

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. Following the 13-week roll out of Project FLAME, this study will provide future evidence regarding the effectiveness of school-based interventions, requiring developmentally and gender-appropriate activities. Motor competence and executive function in children with autism spectrum disorder Ting Liu, Texas