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Ryan G. Overmayer and Matthew W. Driller

). Participants were required to keep training the same for both testing weeks and instructed to avoid high-intensity training <24 hours prior to testing. All testing was performed on the same cycle ergometer (Wattbike Ltd, Nottingham, UK) and at the same time of day (±1 h), to minimize diurnal variation

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Matthew W. Driller, Christos K. Argus, Jason C. Bartram, Jacinta Bonaventura, David T. Martin, Nicholas P. West and Shona L. Halson

Purpose:

To determine the intraday and interday reliability of a 2 × 4-min performance test on a cycle ergometer (Wattbike) separated by 30 min of passive recovery (2 × 4MMP).

Methods:

Twelve highly trained cyclists (mean ± SD; age = 20 ± 2 y, predicted VO2max = 59.0 ± 3.6 mL · kg−1 · min−1) completed six 2 × 4MMP cycling tests on a Wattbike ergometer separated by 7 d. Mean power was measured to determine intraday (test 1 [T1] to test 2 [T2]) and interday reliability (weeks 1–6) over the repeated trials.

Results:

The mean intraday reliabilities of the 2 × 4MMP test, as expressed by the typical error of measurement (TEM, W) and coefficient of variation (CV, %) over the 6 wk, were 10.0 W (95% confidence limits [CL] 8.2–11.8), and 2.6% (95%CL 2.1–3.1), respectively. The mean interday reliability TEM and CV for T1 over the 6 wk were 10.4 W (95%CL 8.7–13.3) and 2.7% (95%CL 2.3–3.5), respectively, and 11.7 W (95%CL 9.8–15.1) and 3.0% (95%CL 2.5–3.9) for T2.

Conclusion:

The testing protocol performed on a Wattbike cycle ergometer in the current study is reproducible in highly trained cyclists. The high intraday and interday reliability make it a reliable method for monitoring cycling performance and for investigating factors that affect performance in cycling events.

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Matthew W. Driller, Christos K. Argus and Cecilia M. Shing

Purpose:

To determine the reliability of a 30-s sprint cycle test on the Wattbike cycle ergometer.

Methods:

Over 3 consecutive weeks, 11 highly trained cyclists (mean ± SD; age 31 ± 6 y, mass 74.6 ± 10.6 kg, height 180.5 ± 8.1cm) completed four 30-s maximal sprints on a Wattbike ergometer after a standardized warmup. The sprint test implemented a “rolling start” that consisted of a 60-s preload (at an intensity of 4.5 W/kg) before the 30-s maximal sprint. Variables determined across the duration of the sprint were peak power (Wpeak), mean power (Wmean), W/kg, mean cadence (rpm), maximum heart rate (n = 10), and postexercise blood lactate.

Results:

The average intraclass correlation coefficients between trials (2v1, 3v2, 4v3, 4v1) were Wpeak .97 (90%CI .94–.99), Wmean .99 (90%CI .97–1.00), W/kg .96 (90%CI .91–.98), mean cadence .96 (90%CI .92–.99), maximum heart rate .99 (90%CI .97–.99), and postexercise blood lactate .94 (90%CI .87–.98). The average typical error of measurement (expressed as a CV% and absolute value between trials—2v1, 3v2, 4v3, 4v1) was Wpeak 4.9%, 52.7 W; Wmean 2.4%, 19.2 W; W/kg 2.3%, 0.18 W/kg; mean cadence 1.4%, 1.6 rpm; maximum heart rate 0.9%, 1.6 beats/min; and postexercise blood lactate 4.6%, 0.48 mmol/L.

Conclusion:

A 30-s sprint test on the Wattbike cycle ergometer is highly reproducible in trained cyclists.

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Adam Beard, John Ashby, Ryan Chambers, Franck Brocherie and Grégoire P. Millet

national squad training, in a double-blinded fashion, players performed 4 ergocycle-based (Wattbike Ltd, Nottingham, United Kingdom) RSH/RSN sessions over a 2-week period. Wattbike repeated-sprint training was a common practice in the team (as in many rugby teams worldwide). Therefore, the players did not

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Alice M. Wallett, Amy L. Woods, Nathan Versey, Laura A. Garvican-Lewis, Marijke Welvaert and Kevin G. Thompson

. Laboratory Sessions A familiarization session was conducted for the first laboratory session of the baseline week. All sessions were performed on calibrated ergometers (Wattbike Pro, Wattbike, Nottingham, United Kingdom) at the same time of day (±1 h). Each participant used the same bike and individualized

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José R. Lillo-Bevia and Jesús G. Pallarés

Velotron, 3 Wattbike, 4 or SRM 5 – 7 ). However, their size, weight, and price can limit their use in laboratories with low-financial resources and by private cyclists and teams. 8 Moreover, even if the ergometers, handlebars, saddles, and pedals were customized specifically for an individual cyclist

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Milos Mallol, David J. Bentley, Lynda Norton, Kevin Norton, Gaizka Mejuto and Javier Yanci

physiological testing at Flinders University’s exercise physiology laboratory. The testing involved standard anthropometric measures (height and body mass) followed by an incremental exercise test to exhaustion to determine VO 2 max on a cycle ergometer (Wattbike, Nottingham, United Kingdom). The cycle

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Samuel T. Tebeck, Jonathan D. Buckley, Clint R. Bellenger and Jamie Stanley

. Figure 1 —Graphical overview of the study design. STHA indicates short-term heat acclimation. Methodology Heat Acclimation Cycle exercise began (Wattbike Pro, Wattbike Ltd, Nottingham, United Kingdom) at a self-selected work rate that corresponded to an RPE of 15 (hard) on a 6 to 20 RPE scale until a

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Emma K. Zadow, Cecilia M. Kitic, Sam S.X. Wu and James W. Fell

, Passfield L . Validity and reliability of the Wattbike cycle ergometer . Int J Sports Med . 2010 ; 31 : 731 – 736 . PubMed doi:10.1055/s-0030-1261968 20665423 10.1055/s-0030-1261968 7. Gardner AS , Stephens S , Martin DT , Lawton E , Lee H , Jenkins D . Accuracy of SRM and Power Tap

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Peter Francis, Kay Gray and Nic Perrem

-up consisted of 5 min on a bicycle ergometer (Wattbike Cycle Ergometer; Wattbike Pro, Nottingham, UK) at a cadence of 60 RPM. Intensity was self-selected at what they felt was their normal warm-up pace. Performance of the YBT was conducted prior to isokinetic testing of hip abductor strength. The nondominant