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Hal A. Lawson

. They announce what something is alongside what it is not. They announce who someone is and who she/he is not. Boundaries are two-dimensional. Their horizontal dimension serves to differentiate categories for the same phenomenon—for example, between specialized academic disciplines. The vertical

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Molly Hayes Sauder, Michael Mudrick, and Jaime R. DeLuca

The ubiquitous and widespread nature of sport, combined with the abundance of jobs associated with the product, has enabled the field of sport management to proliferate into a popular academic discipline sought by college students ( Jones, Brooks, & Mak, 2008 ; Mahony, 2008 ). As of 2009, sport

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John Vincent, Jason W. Lee, Kevin Hull, and John Hill

academic disciplines, highlighting how successful athletic and academic programs are flip sides of the same coin that can be synergistically integrated into campaigns. It also demonstrated how archetype personas can be effectively employed to energize not just football fans but also entire academic

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Elizabeth A. Taylor, Molly Hayes Sauder, and Cheryl R. Rode

1980s ( Parkhouse & Pitts, 2005 ) to the present. Research on the state of the academic discipline has examined a number of topics, and the collective work suggests that there are several unique factors that make an examination of it as a subculture of higher education worthwhile. For example, research

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Kristen D. Dieffenbach and Valerie Wayda

Among the physical activity, exercise and health related academic disciplines, coaching education remains an under-developed field. Once closely aligned with physical education, coaching education has remained practically immobile despite the activity and growth in the related functional fitness and sport performance fields of exercise and sport sciences such as sport pedagogy, exercise physiology, and sport and exercise psychology. This article provides a historical context for the evolution of the academic discipline of coaching education within the broader field of physical education and a brief overview of coaching education as it exists within academia today. Recommendations and suggestions are made for the future growth and development of the coaching education discipline.

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David A. Dzewaltowski, Mary McElroy, Timothy I. Musch, David C. Poole, and Craig A. Harms

Kinesiology is an academic discipline with a body of content that can be drawn on to support professions and to solve important public health problems. The Kansas State Physical Activity Systems Framework defines a new approach to structure the discipline. Central to the framework is the rejection of a kinesiology subdisciplinary approach and the adoption of an integrated “cell-to-society” systems approach. Each level of physical activity systems is addressed in undergraduate and graduate education and research. Supporting the framework are two research and education teams: exercise physiology and exercise behavioral science. These teams provide core integrated academic discipline content expertise and expertise for integrating professional application areas, such as public health. The framework has evolved over 20 years at Kansas State University, where today the Department of Kinesiology delivers high-quality extramurally-funded research; BS, MS, MPH, and PhD programs; and outreach in a cost-effective manner.

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Karen S. Meaney, Ting Liu, and Lara M. Duke

The rapidly increasing enrollment in kinesiology programs recognizes the important role of our academic discipline in promoting future professionals within the physical activity, fitness, wellness, education, sport, and allied health domains. Unprecedented growth in student interest in kinesiology offers faculty and administrators in higher education both exciting opportunities and difficult challenges. One significant concern facing kinesiology faculty is maintaining high-quality instruction within growing class sizes. Incorporating service-learning components within kinesiology curricula provides numerous benefits to students, faculty, institutions of higher education, and members of our local and global communities. In addition, service-learning has the potential to initiate innovative and entrepreneurial learning experiences and funding opportunities for students and faculty.

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Gina Pauline

Sport management as an academic discipline requires a balance of theory and practice through endowing students with knowledge, critical thinking skills, and expertise (Cuneen & Parks, 1997). Professionals call for students being “prepared” for the demands of the sport industry through the acquisition of a quality education and a significant amount of hands-on experience before entering the work force. Researchers have recommended utilizing experiential pedagogical strategies to not only provide the hands-on engagement but also to challenge students to use their knowledge for the public good (e.g., Bruening, Madsen, Evanovich, & Fuller, 2010; Chalip, 2006; McKelvey & Southall, 2008; Pauline & Pauline, 2008). It also supports the recent trend to educate students in the world beyond the confines of the college campus. Boyer (1996) noted engaging outside the confines of campus will not only give students hands on experience but also, cultivate a student’s cognitive and moral development, which is often underestimated in higher education.

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Peter J. Ellery and Michael J. Stewart

A survey of the 13 master’s level and five doctoral level adapted physical education programs that received federal funding in the United States in 1998 was conducted to develop a profile describing their attributes. The response rate was 100% (N = 18). Results indicated that these programs, in general, had received funding for more than 15 years, offered coursework from an average of three different academic disciplines, had a high graduate employment rate within 12 months of graduation, and had about one third of the graduates representing a recognized minority group. Master’s level teacher preparation programs were concentrated in the eastern region of the U.S., had graduates with predominantly in-state home addresses, and had graduated predominantly females. Doctoral level leadership programs were geographically distributed across the U.S., had graduates with predominantly out-of-state home addresses, and had equal graduate representation from both genders.

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Jacquelyn Cuneen

Sport management was acknowledged early in its formative years as an academic area with great potential for success in the academy. Due largely to the efforts of members of the North American Society for Sport Management (NASSM), sport management quickly became entrenched in academe and is starting to be recognized as an academic area of merit. It is important to manage our overall program excellence as we move from “potential” to “merit” if sport management is to thrive as an academic discipline and profession. It is particularly important to mange our merit since our transition phase occurs amidst many changes and challenges (e.g., the student as consumer; under-representation of National Association for Sport and Physical Education/NASSM Approved Programs; under-recognition of sport management teaching excellence, and diminishing service roles and interests within industry and academe). The purpose of this essay is to posit approaches through which sport management’s educational programs might maintain their well-earned meritorious reputations amid shifting academic and social cultures. This essay is the text of the 2003 Dr. Earle F. Zeigler Lecture presented on May 30 at the 18th Annual Meeting of NASSM in Ithaca, New York.