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David I. Anderson and Richard E.A. van Emmerik

The 40th anniversary of the publication of George Brooks’s Perspectives on the Academic Discipline of Physical Education: A Tribute to G. Lawrence Rarick (1981) represents a wonderful opportunity to take stock of where the discipline of kinesiology stands today and how it has transformed over the

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Melinda A. Solmon

In reflecting on the evolution in perspectives on the academic discipline of kinesiology over the past 4 decades, perhaps the most substantive shift across the field has been the transition from the use of “physical education” as an umbrella term encompassing the subdisciplines to the use of the

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KRJ Kinesiology Review 2163-0453 2161-6035 1 08 2021 10 3 10.1123/kr.2021.10.issue-3 Special Issue: Commemorating George Brooks’s Perspectives on the Academic Discipline of Physical Education Guest Editors: David I. Anderson and Richard E.A. van Emmerik INTRODUCTION 10.1123/kr.2021-0029 SCHOLARLY

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George B. Cunningham, Janet S. Fink, and James J. Zhang

Four decades have passed since the publication of Perspectives on the Academic Discipline of Physical Education: A Tribute to G. Lawrence Rarick ( Brooks, 1981 ). The edited volume offered a thorough treatment of physical education at the time. In addition to overviewing the academic discipline

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Hal A. Lawson

. They announce what something is alongside what it is not. They announce who someone is and who she/he is not. Boundaries are two-dimensional. Their horizontal dimension serves to differentiate categories for the same phenomenon—for example, between specialized academic disciplines. The vertical

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Mark Dyreson and Jaime Schultz

A quick perusal of the 1981 anthology Perspectives on the Academic Discipline of Physical Education: A Tribute to G. Lawrence Rarick that inspires this special issue reveals a significant “key” development in the history of physical activity over the past 4 decades. In the original version of

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Jane E. Clark and Jill Whitall

departments, particularly at University of California, Los Angeles and Berkeley, to justify their field as an academic discipline. In 1981, George Brooks in his edited book, Perspectives on the Academic Discipline of Physical Education, takes on the challenge to show the scholarly aspects of physical

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R. Scott Kretchmar and Cesar R. Torres

, philosophy may be overlooked. A case in point is George Brooks’s ( 1981 ) anthology Perspectives on the Academic Discipline of Physical Education: A Tribute to G. Lawrence Rarick , whose 40th anniversary is celebrated in this special issue. Philosophy was not represented among the subdisciplines included in

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Diane L. Gill, Erin J. Reifsteck, and Leilani Madrigal

I (D.L. Gill) am pleased to contribute to the 40th anniversary celebration of the Brooks-edited book Perspectives on the Academic Discipline of Physical Education . As a very early-career scholar, I ( Gill, 1981 ) wrote the chapter on sport psychology for that book. Now, as a very senior scholar

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Sarah B. Williams, Elizabeth A. Taylor, T. Christopher Greenwell, and Brigitte M. Burpo

( De Welde & Laursen, 2011 ; Jagst et al., 2016 ). Rosenthal et al. ( 2016 ) surveyed graduate students across an array of academic disciplines, and female students reported experiencing higher rates of sexual harassment from both fellow students and faculty than male graduate students across all