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Jocelyn K. Mara, Kevin G. Thompson and Kate L. Pumpa

Purpose:

To investigate the physical and physiological response to different formats of various-sided games.

Methods:

Eighteen elite women’s soccer players wore 15-Hz global positioning system devices and heart-rate (HR) monitors during various-sided games (small, 4 vs 4 and 5 vs 5; medium, 6 vs 6 and 7 vs 7; large, 8 vs 8 and 9 vs 9).

Results:

Players covered more relative sprinting distance during large-sided games than in small-sided (P < .001, d = 0.69) and medium-sided (P < .001, d = 0.54) games. In addition, a greater proportion of total acceleration efforts that had a commencement velocity <1 m/s were observed in small-sided games (44.7% ± 5.5%) than in large-sided games (36.7% ± 10.6%) (P = .018, d = 0.94). This was accompanied by a greater proportion of acceleration efforts with a final velocity equivalent to the sprint threshold in large-sided games (15.4% ± 7.7%) than in small-sided games (5.2% ± 2.5%) (P < .001, d = 1.78). The proportion of time spent in HR zone 4 (>85% maximum HR) was greater during small-sided games (69.8% ± 2.5%) than in medium- (62.1% ± 2.8%, d = 2.90) and large-sided games (54.9% ± 3.1%) (P < .001, d = 5.29).

Conclusions:

The results from this study demonstrate that coaches can use small-sided games as an aerobic conditioning stimulus and to develop players’ explosiveness and repeat-sprint ability over short durations. Large-sided games can be used to maintain aerobic capacity and develop maximum speed over longer distances.

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Jonathan M. Williams, Michael Gara and Carol Clark

quantify the sacral acceleration profile and test–retest reliability during hop landing. Methods Participants A total of 17 participants (mean [SD]: age 27.6 [5.7] y, height 1.731 [0.105] m, mass 74.1 [13.9] kg) were recruited through social media advertisement. This was based on a sample size calculation

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Niels J. Nedergaard, Mark A. Robinson, Elena Eusterwiemann, Barry Drust, Paulo J. Lisboa and Jos Vanrenterghem

Purpose:

To investigate the relationship between whole-body accelerations and body-worn accelerometry during team-sport movements.

Methods:

Twenty male team-sport players performed forward running and anticipated 45° and 90° side-cuts at approach speeds of 2, 3, 4, and 5 m/s. Whole-body center-of-mass (CoM) accelerations were determined from ground-reaction forces collected from 1 foot–ground contact, and segmental accelerations were measured from a commercial GPS accelerometer unit on the upper trunk. Three higher-specification accelerometers were also positioned on the GPS unit, the dorsal aspect of the pelvis, and the shaft of the tibia. Associations between mechanical load variables (peak acceleration, loading rate, and impulse) calculated from both CoM accelerations and segmental accelerations were explored using regression analysis. In addition, 1-dimensional statistical parametric mapping (SPM) was used to explore the relationships between peak segmental accelerations and CoM-acceleration profiles during the whole foot–ground contact.

Results:

A weak relationship was observed for the investigated mechanical load variables regardless of accelerometer location and task (R 2 values across accelerometer locations and tasks: peak acceleration .08–.55, loading rate .27–.59, and impulse .02–.59). Segmental accelerations generally overestimated whole-body mechanical load. SPM analysis showed that peak segmental accelerations were mostly related to CoM accelerations during the first 40–50% of contact phase.

Conclusions:

While body-worn accelerometry correlates to whole-body loading in team-sport movements and can reveal useful estimates concerning loading, these correlations are not strong. Body-worn accelerometry should therefore be used with caution to monitor whole-body mechanical loading in the field.

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Steve Barrett

like to thank Chris Towlson, Matt Weston, Shaun McLaren, Rob Price, and James Malone for their communication during this study. No financial support was received for this project. References 1. Varley V , Aughey R . Acceleration profiles in elite Australian soccer . Int J Sports Med . 2013 ; 34

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Howard N. Zelaznik

variability that results. Theoretically, these timing constraints are thought to require an individual to control a movement with a single positive acceleration profile followed by a single negative acceleration profile. On the other hand, because the Fitts task is spatially constrained, the negative

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Paul S. Bradley and Jack D. Ade

. 2014 ; 44 ( 5 ): 701 – 712 . PubMed doi:10.1007/s40279-014-0144-3 10.1007/s40279-014-0144-3 4. Varley MC , Aughey RJ . Acceleration profiles in elite Australian soccer . Int J Sports Med. 2013 ; 34 ( 1 ): 34 – 39 . PubMed doi:10.1055/s-0032-1316315 22895869 5. Di Mascio M , Bradley PS

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Reed D. Gurchiek, Hasthika S. Rupasinghe Arachchige Don, Lasanthi C. R. Pelawa Watagoda, Ryan S. McGinnis, Herman van Werkhoven, Alan R. Needle, Jeffrey M. McBride and Alan T. Arnholt

. Simperingham KD , Cronin JB , Ross A . Advances in sprint acceleration profiling for field-based team-sport athletes: utility, reliability, validity and limitations . Sports Med . 2016 ; 46 ( 11 ): 1619 – 1645 . PubMed ID: 26914267 doi:10.1007/s40279-016-0508-y 26914267 10.1007/s40279-016-0508-y 8

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Ted Polglaze and Matthias W. Hoppe

in team sports . Sports Med . 2016 ; 46 ( 5 ): 657 – 670 . PubMed ID: 26643522 doi:10.1007/s40279-015-0449-x 26643522 10.1007/s40279-015-0449-x 13. Varley MC , Aughey RJ . Acceleration profiles in elite Australian soccer . Int J Sports Med . 2013 ; 34 ( 1 ): 34 – 39 . PubMed ID: 22895869

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Cathal Cassidy, Kieran Collins and Marcus Shortall

.1080/17461390802251851 Reilly , T. , & Doran , D. ( 2001 ). Science and Gaelic football: A review . Journal of Sports Sciences, 19 ( 3 ), 181 – 193 . doi:10.1080/026404101750095330 10.1080/026404101750095330 Ryan , M. , Malone , S. , & Collins , K. ( 2017 ). An acceleration profile of elite Gaelic football

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Joshua Twaites, Richard Everson, Joss Langford and Melvyn Hillsdon

more variable than that gathered in a laboratory setting. For example a person may walk holding a bag or a coffee. In such cases both activities would be labelled the same but would have considerably different acceleration profiles. In a laboratory setting participants are encouraged to perform the