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Jason Bocarro, Michael A. Kanters, Jonathan Casper, and Scott Forrester

The purpose of this article is to examine the role of school-based extracurricular initiatives in facilitating immediate and long-term positive impact on physical activity, healthy behavior, and obesity in children. A critique of the role of various sports-related initiatives that have been developed to address the obesity epidemic currently facing children within the United States is provided, with a specific emphasis on intramural sports as a preferred mechanism to encourage long-term involvement in sport and physically active pursuits. The article presents support for the notion that a physical education curriculum that includes intramurals before, during, and after school can help children learn the skills to enjoy participation in a variety of sports designed to facilitate lifelong active living.

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Stacy Imagbe, Baofu Wang, Yang Liu, Jared Androzzi, Xiangli Gu, and Senlin Chen

Health habits and active living in youth need improvement across the United States, especially among racial and ethnic minorities such as Blacks and Hispanics ( Centers for Disease Control Prevention, 2017 ; Liu & Chen, 2020b ). Active living is featured by regular participation in moderate to

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Hsin-Yen Yen and Hsuan Hsu

( Gallè et al., 2017 ). A healthy lifestyle can help older adults preserve their abilities and functionality for healthy aging, especially in terms of healthy eating and active living (HEAL; Cheadle et al., 2018 ). HEAL is a beneficial strategy for preventing NCDs, prolonging older adults’ life

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Yang Liu, Senlin Chen, and Xiangli Gu

One ultimate goal of school physical education (PE) is to develop physically literate individuals who possess the desirable physical competence, knowledge, and attitude needed for living an active lifestyle ( Chen & Gu, 2018 ; SHAPE America, 2014 ). The active living lifestyle is featured by

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Yang Liu and Senlin Chen

and fitness ( Society for Health and Physical Educators [SHAPE America], 2014 ). To promote physical activity and fitness in youth, PE curricula should maintain a focus on teaching students’ essential knowledge and fostering behaviors toward active living ( Chen & Gu, 2018b ). A solid knowledge base

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jpah Journal of Physical Activity and Health 1543-3080 1543-5474 1 2011 8 s1 10.1123/jpah.2011.8.issue-s1 Engaging Communities to Create Active Living Environments With generous support provided by Active Living Research, a national program office of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the

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jpah Journal of Physical Activity and Health 1543-3080 1543-5474 1 2006 3 s1 10.1123/jpah.2006.3.issue-s1 The Second Active Living Research Conference Research 10.1123/jpah.3.s1.s1 10.1123/jpah.3.s1.s6 10.1123/jpah.3.s1.s20 10.1123/jpah.3.s1.s30 10.1123/jpah.3.s1.s55 10.1123/jpah.3.s1.s77 10

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Opal Vanessa Buchthal, Nicole Taniguchi, Livia Iskandar, and Jay Maddock

Background:

Physical inactivity is a growing problem in the United States, one that is being addressed through the development of active living communities. However, active living promotion requires collaboration among organizations that may not have previously shared goals.

Methods:

A network analysis was conducted to assess Hawaii’s active living promotion network. Twenty-six organizations playing a significant role in promoting active living in Hawaii were identified and surveyed about their frequency of contact, level of collaboration, and funding flow with other agencies.

Results:

A communication network was identified linking all agencies. This network had many long pathways, impeding information flow. The Department of Health (DOH) and the State Nutrition and Physical Activity Coalition (NPAC) were central nodes, but DOH connected state agencies while NPAC linked county and voluntary organizations. Within the network, information sharing was common, but collaboration and formal partnership were low. Linkages between county and state agencies, between counties, and between state agencies with different core agendas were particularly low.

Conclusions:

Results suggest that in the early stages of development, active living networks may be divided by geography and core missions, requiring work to bridge these divides. Network mapping appears helpful in identifying areas for network development.

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Andrea Nathan, Lisa Wood, and Billie Giles-Corti

This study explored individual, social, and built environmental attributes in and outside of the retirement village setting and associations with various active living outcomes including objectively measured physical activity, specific walking behaviors, and social participation. Residents in Perth, Australia (N = 323), were surveyed on environmental perceptions of the village and surrounding neighborhood, self-reported physical activity, and demographic characteristics and wore accelerometers. Managers (N = 32) were surveyed on village characteristics, and objective neighborhood measures were generated in a Geographic Information System (GIS). Results indicated that built- and social-environmental attributes within and outside of retirement villages were associated with active living among residents; however, salient attributes varied depending on the specific outcome considered. Findings suggest that locating villages close to destinations is important for walking and that locating them close to previous and familiar neighborhoods is important for social participation. Further understanding and consideration into retirement village designs that promote both walking and social participation are needed.

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Leigh F. Callahan, Rebecca J. Cleveland, Jack Shreffler, Jennifer M. Hootman, Thelma J. Mielenz, Britta Schoster, Teresa Brady, and Todd Schwartz

Background:

Adults with arthritis can benefit from participation in physical activity and may be assisted by organized programs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a 20-week behavioral lifestyle intervention, Active Living Every Day (ALED), for improvements in primary outcomes (physical activity levels, aerobic endurance, function, symptoms).

Methods:

A 20-week randomized controlled community trial was conducted in 354 adults. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and 20 weeks in the intervention and wait-list control groups. The intervention group was also assessed at 6 and 12 months. Mean outcomes were determined by multilevel regression models in the intervention and control groups at follow-up points.

Results:

At 20 weeks, the intervention group significantly increased participation in physical activity, and improved aerobic endurance, and select measures of function while pain, fatigue and stiffness remained status quo. In the intervention group, significant improvements in physical activity at 20 weeks were maintained at 6 and 12 months, and stiffness decreased.

Conclusions:

ALED appears to improve participation in physical activity, aerobic endurance, and function without exacerbating disease symptoms in adults with arthritis.