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Carla Filomena Silva and P. David Howe

This paper is a call to Adapted Physical Activity (APA) professionals to increase the reflexive nature of their practice. Drawing upon Foucault’s concept of governmentality (1977) APA action may work against its own publicized goals of empowerment and self-determination. To highlight these inconsistencies, we will draw upon historical and social factors that explain the implicit dangers of practice not following policy. We propose that APA practitioners work according to ethical guidelines, based upon a capabilities approach (Nussbaum, 2006, 2011; Sen, 2009) to counteract possible adverse effects of APA practitioner action. A capabilities approach is conducive to the development of each individual’s human potential, by holistically considering the consequences of physical activity (i.e., biological, cultural, social, and psychological dimensions). To conclude, this paper will offer suggestions that may lead to an ethical reflection aligned with the best interest of APA’s users.

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Danielle Peers

ethically be fixed ( Hobbs & Rice, 2013 ). In short, “The Heterosexual Questionnaire” was an axiological intervention. In this article, I am attempting to make a similar axiological intervention within the context of adapted physical activity (APA): one that renders noticeable the tacit values, and ethical

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Rebecca T. Marsh Naturkach and Donna L. Goodwin

reflection enable the identification of positive actions for improvement in future encounters. Undergraduate university instructors have historically used disability-related CSL to prepare adapted physical activity students for professional practice ( Connolly, 1994 ; DePauw, 2000 ; Hodge & Jansma, 1999

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Øyvind F. Standal, Tor Erik H. Nyquist, and Hanne H. Mong

Adapted physical activity (APA) is a slippery term. It has had various definitions throughout the years ( Reid, 2003 ; Sherrill & DePauw, 1997 ), and currently (as of November 2017), the European Federation of APA states that its definition is an object of discussion and may therefore evolve over

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Amanda Ebert and Donna L. Goodwin

Those who work in the realm of adapted physical activity (APA) are committed to advancing well-being, opportunities for physical activity, and engagement of disabled people 1 in society ( Goodwin & Rossow-Kimball, 2012 ). Professionals in the multidisciplinary field of APA draw from many parent

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Lindsay Eales and Donna L. Goodwin

connection). It is a social and political issue (think cultural, intergenerational, and oppression-based trauma). Trauma is also perpetuated and perpetrated by institutions and service providers ( Harris & Fallot, 2001 ), including those providing adaptive physical activity (APA) services ( Ebert & Goodwin

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Jeffrey Martin and Drew Martin

inadequate amounts of PA for children with impairments (e.g.,  Esposito et al., 2012 ; Lloyd et al., 2014 ). Inductive reasoning following Mill’s Canons ( 1950 ) would lead most adapted physical activity (APA) scientists to suggest the above body of work is not indicative of false positives. Jager and Leek

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Barry Lavay and Peggy Lasko-McCarthey

To successfully conduct quality research, professionals in adapted physical activity (APA) must address a number of unique and challenging issues. These issues include difficulty in acquiring large and homogenous samples; developing valid, reliable, and commercially available test instruments and protocols specific to persons with disabilities; properly training doctoral students to conduct quality research; and maintaining a specific research focus. With regard to these issues, this paper provides the following recommendations: utilize alternative research designs; acquire adequate graduate research training; develop a research focus as an adapted physical activity researcher; and promote an interdisciplinary, collaborative research effort among professionals. Most important, through continued scholarly research adapted physical activity professionals will be able to expand the scientific body of knowledge.

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Yeshayahu Hutzler and Claudine Sherrill

The purpose of this study was to describe international perspectives concerning terms, definitions, and meanings of adapted physical activity (APA) as (a) activities or service delivery, (b) a profession, and (c) an academic field of study. Gergen’s social constructionism, our theory, guided analysis of multiple sources of data via qualitative methodology. Data sources were online surveys, APA literature, and expertise of researchers. Findings, with the identification of further considerations, were provided for each APA component to stimulate reflection and further inquiry among international professionals with diverse backgrounds.

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Donna L. Goodwin and Brenda Rossow-Kimball

There has been little critical exploration of the ethical issues that arise in professional practice common to adapted physical activity. We cannot avoid moral issues as we inevitably will act in ways that will negatively affect the well-being of others. We will make choices, which in our efforts to support others, may hurt by violating dignity or infringing on rights. The aim of this paper is to open a dialogue on what constitutes ethical practice in adapted physical activity. Ethical theories including principlism, virtue ethics, ethics of care, and relational ethics provide a platform for addressing questions of right and good and wrong and bad in the field of adapted physical activity. Unpacking of stories of professional practice (including sacred, secret, and cover stories) against the lived experiences of persons experiencing disability will create a knowledge landscape in adapted physical activity that is sensitive to ethical reflection.