Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,402 items for :

Clear All
Restricted access

Katya Vargas-Ortiz, Victoriano Perez-Vazquez, Francisco J. Diaz-Cisneros, Arturo Figueroa, Lizbeth M. Jiménez-Flores, Gustavo Rodriguez-DelaRosa and Maciste H. Macias

Sirtuin 3 enzyme (SIRT3) is involved in the regulation of mitochondrial energy homeostasis by activating Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator (PGC-1α). Murine models have shown that the protein SIRT3 was modified by exercise and diet, however, the effect of exercise without diet in humans has not been examined. Propose of this paper was to analyze the effect of aerobic training on SIRT3 and PGC-1α in skeletal muscle of overweight adolescents without change in caloric intake. Fourteen overweight or obese male adolescents (15.5 ± 0.8 years) trained 3 days-week/50 min x session, at 70-80% of maximal heart rate for 12 weeks. Anthropometrics and skeletal muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis were taken before and after the exercise program to measure adiposity, SIRT3, and PGC-1α proteins. Peak aerobic capacity (VO2peak) was estimated before and after training. The participants did not change their eating habits during the intervention. SIRT3 (1.05 ± 0.11 vs. 1.25 ± 0.14 AU, p = .014) and PGC-1a (1.06 ± 0.15 Vs 1.39 ± 0.20 AU, p = .009) increased. Fat percentage and waist circumference decreased (p < .05). VO2peak increased after training (p < .001). There was a significant association between SIRT3 and PGC-1α after training program. These data suggest that aerobic training increased SIRT3 and PGC-1a expression levels in sedentary, overweight, or obese adolescents.

Restricted access

Tania Pereira, John Durocher and Jamie Burr

exercise intensity over the duration of the activity and could include more vigorous bouts of activity within a ride. For example, oxygen consumption while horseback riding was measured to range from 40% to 80% of a rider’s maximal aerobic capacity over the course of a single ride in female recreational

Restricted access

Timothy Martinson, Stephen A. Butterfield, Craig A. Mason, Shihfen Tu, Robert A. Lehnhard and Christopher J. Nightingale

Aerobic capacity is widely accepted as the single best indicator of physical fitness and overall cardiovascular health in adolescents ( 2 ). Poor cardiovascular health and obesity in children are associated with hyperlipidemia, type II diabetes, hypertension, coronary artery disease, stroke, sleep

Restricted access

Alexei Wong, Marcos A. Sanchez-Gonzalez, Won-Mok Son, Yi-Sub Kwak and Song-Young Park

has been suggested as a nonpharmacological treatment to decrease excess adipose tissue while improving cardiovascular function in both young and old individuals ( 15 , 45 ). Although the effectiveness of aerobic exercise for decreasing fat mass and IR in obese pediatric and adults populations is well

Open access

Keishi Soga, Keita Kamijo and Hiroaki Masaki

, & Kramer, 2015 for a review). For example, a cross-sectional study using a hippocampus-dependent relational memory task in children ( Chaddock et al., 2010 ) has indicated that greater aerobic fitness is associated with larger hippocampal volume and superior memory performance. A longitudinal, randomized

Restricted access

Shirit Kamil-Rosenberg, Mary L. Greaney, Tsivia Hochman and Carol Ewing Garber

limitations nor using special equipment. Physical Activity Respondents’ PA levels were determined using six items on the BRFSS that assessed time spent participating in moderate- or vigorous-intensity aerobic PAs and the frequency of engaging in muscle-strengthening exercises. Using the classification scheme

Restricted access

Bareket Falk and Raffy Dotan

Measurement of Aerobic Power—Why is it Important? Maximal aerobic power ( V ˙ O 2 max ) is one of the 2 main constituents of aerobic capacity—the other one being aerobic endurance (percentage of V ˙ O 2 max that can be maintained for given distances or durations). Aerobic endurance is difficult

Restricted access

Stephen H. Boutcher

The effects of aerobic fitness on psychological and behavioral variables are currently receiving increased attention. However, the results of past research in these areas are equivocal, mainly due to differences in the methods used to quantify aerobic fitness and the failure to address issues concerning adaptation responses to aerobic training. It is suggested that direct assessment of V02max and estimation of lactate threshold are currently the most suitable measures of aerobic power and adaptation responses to aerobic exercise. To better understand how aerobic fitness affects psychological variables, it is also necessary to consider genetic influences and level and mode of adaptation to aerobic training. It is suggested that there should be more focus on examining underlying mechanisms common to both aerobic fitness and the phenomenon of interest. This focus should integrate multiple adaptation patterns and physiological and psychological responses rather than measure solitary parameters.

Open access

Neil Armstrong

Aerobic (or cardiorespiratory or cardiopulmonary) fitness reflects the integrated ability to deliver oxygen from the atmosphere to the skeletal muscles and to utilize it to generate energy to support muscle activity during exercise. Aerobic fitness is the most researched physiological variable in

Restricted access

Fernando Naclerio, Eneko Larumbe-Zabala, Mar Larrosa, Aitor Centeno, Jonathan Esteve-Lanao and Diego Moreno-Pérez

peak oxygen consumption ( V ˙ O 2 peak ) and maximal aerobic speed (MAS). Based on the available literature, we hypothesized that compared with an isoenergetic-only carbohydrate supplement, the postworkout ingestion of a carbohydrate–protein admixture would protect muscle mass and promote fat reduction