Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 21 items for :

  • "arthrogenic" x
Clear All
Restricted access

J. Ty Hopkins and Christopher D. Ingersoll

Objectives:

To define the concept of arthrogenic muscle inhibition (AMI), to discuss its implications in the rehabilitation of joint injury, to discuss the neurophysiologic events that lead to AMI, to evaluate the methods available to measure AM1 and the models that might be implemented to examine AMI, and to review therapeutic interventions that might reduce AMI.

Data Sources:

The databases MEDLINE, SPORTDiscus, and CIHNAL were searched with the terms reflex inhibition, joint mechanoreceptor, Ib interneuron, Hoffmann reflex, effusion, and joint injury. The remaining citations were collected from references of similar papers.

Conclusions:

AMI is a limiting factor in the rehabilitation of joint injury. It results in atrophy and deficiencies in strength and increases the susceptibility to further injury. A therapeutic intervention that results in decreased inhibition, allowing for active exercise, would lead to faster and more complete recovery.

Restricted access

Daniel H. Huffman, Brian G. Pietrosimone, Terry L. Grindstaff, Joseph M. Hart, Susan A. Saliba and Christopher D. Ingersoll

Context:

Motoneuron-pool facilitation after cryotherapy may be mediated by stimulation of thermoreceptors surrounding a joint. It is unknown whether menthol counterirritants, which also stimulate thermoreceptors, have the same effect on motoneuron-pool excitability (MNPE).

Objective:

To compare quadriceps MNPE after a menthol-counterirritant application to the anterior knee, a sham counterirritant application, and a control treatment in healthy subjects.

Design:

A blinded, randomized controlled laboratory study.

Setting:

Laboratory.

Participants:

Thirty healthy subjects (16 m, 14 f; 24.1 ± 3.9 y, 170.6 ± 11.4 cm, 72.1 ± 15.6 kg) with no history of lower extremity surgery volunteered for this study.

Intervention:

Two milliliters of menthol or sham counterirritant was applied to the anterior knee; control subjects received no intervention.

Main Outcome Measures:

The average vastus medialis normalized Hoffmann reflex (Hmax:Mmax ratio) was used to measure MNPE. Measurements were recorded at 5, 15, 25, and 35 minutes postintervention and compared with baseline measures.

Results:

Hmax:Mmax ratios for all groups significantly decreased over time (F 4,108 = 10.52, P < .001; menthol: baseline = .32 ± .20, 5 min = .29 ± .18, 15 min = .27 ± .18, 25 min = .28 ± .19, 35 min = .27 ± .18; sham: baseline = .46 ± .26, 5 min = .36 ± .20, 15 min = .35 ± .19, 25 min = .35 ± .20, 35 min = .34 ± .18; control: baseline = .48 ± .32, 5 min = .37 ± .27, 15 min = .37 ± .27, 25 min = .37 ± .29, 35 min = .35 ± .28). No significant Group × Time interaction or group differences in Hmax:Mmax were found.

Conclusions:

Menthol did not affect quadriceps MNPE in healthy subjects.

Restricted access

Dana M. Otzel, Chris J. Hass, Erik A. Wikstrom, Mark D. Bishop, Paul A. Borsa and Mark D. Tillman

leading to CAI are unclear, arthrogenic muscle inhibition (AMI) may contribute to the recurrent dysfunction and joint instability symptoms. 7 AMI is the diminished ability to contract the musculature surrounding an injured joint and is associated with reduction in motoneuron (MN) pool recruitment. 8

Restricted access

Christopher Kuenze, Jay Hertel and Joseph M. Hart

Purpose:

Persistent quadriceps weakness due to arthrogenic muscle inhibition (AMI) has been reported after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Fatiguing exercise has been shown to alter lower extremity muscle function and gait mechanics, which may be related to injury risk. The effects of exercise on lower extremity function in the presence of AMI are not currently understood. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of 30 min of exercise on quadriceps muscle function and soleus motoneuron-pool excitability in ACL-reconstructed participants and healthy controls.

Methods:

Twenty-six (13 women, 13 men) healthy and 26 (13 women, 13 men) ACL-reconstructed recreationally active volunteers were recruited for a case-control laboratory study. All participants completed 30 min of continuous exercise including alternating cycles of inclined-treadmill walking and bouts of squats and step-ups. Knee-extension torque, quadriceps central activation ratio (CAR), soleus H:M ratio, and soleus V:M ratio were measured before and after 30 min of exercise.

Results:

There was a significant group × time interaction for knee-extension torque (P = .002), quadriceps CAR (P = .03), and soleus V:M ratio (P = .03). The effect of exercise was smaller for the ACL-R group than for matched controls for knee-extension torque (ACL-R: %Δ = −4.2 [−8.7, 0.3]; healthy: %Δ = −14.2 [−18.2, −10.2]), quadriceps CAR (ACL-R: %Δ = −5.1 [−8.0, −2.1]; healthy: %Δ = −10.0 [−13.3, −6.7]), and soleus V:M ratio (ACL-R: %Δ = 37.6 [2.1, 73.0]; healthy: %Δ = −24.9 [−38.6, −11.3]).

Conclusion:

Declines in quadriceps and soleus volitional muscle function were of lower magnitude in ACL-R subjects than in healthy matched controls. This response suggests an adaptation experienced by patients with quadriceps AMI that may act to maintain lower extremity function during prolonged exercise.

Restricted access

Brandon Warner, Kyung-Min Kim, Joseph M. Hart and Susan Saliba

Context:

Quadriceps function improves after application of focal joint cooling or transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation to the knee in patients with arthrogenic muscle inhibition (AMI), yet it is not known whether superficial heat is able to produce a similar effect.

Objective:

To determine quadriceps function after superficial heat to the knee joint in individuals with AMI.

Design:

Single blinded randomized crossover.

Setting:

Laboratory.

Patients:

12 subjects (4 female, 8 males; 25.6 ± 7.7 y, 177.2 ± 12.7 cm, 78.4 ± 18.2 kg) with a history of knee-joint pathology and AMI, determined with a quadriceps central activation ratio (CAR) of <90%.

Intervention:

3 treatment conditions for 15 min on separate days: superficial heat using a cervical moist-heat pack (77°C), sham using a cervical moist pack (room temperature at about 24°C), and control (no treatment). All subjects received all treatment conditions in a randomized order.

Main Outcome Measures:

Central activation ratio and knee-extension torque during maximal voluntary isometric contraction with the knee flexed to 60° were collected at pre, immediately post, 30 min post, and 45 min posttreatment. Skin temperature of the quadriceps and knee and room temperature were also recorded at the same time points.

Results:

Three (treatment conditions) by 4 (time) repeated ANOVAs found that there were no significant interactions or main effects in either CAR or knee-extension torque (all P > .05). Skin-temperature 1-way ANOVAs revealed that the skin temperature in the knee during superficial heat was significantly higher than other treatment conditions at all time points (P < .05).

Conclusions:

Superficial heat to the knee joint using a cervical moist-heat pack did not influence quadriceps function in individuals with AMI in the quadriceps.

Restricted access

Cody B. Bremner, William R. Holcomb, Christopher D. Brown and Melanie E. Perreault

Clinical Scenario:

Orthopedic knee conditions are regularly treated in sports-medicine clinics. Rehabilitation protocols for these conditions are often designed to address the associated quadriceps strength deficits. Despite these efforts, patients with orthopedic knee conditions often fail to completely regain their quadriceps strength. Disinhibitory modalities have recently been suggested as a clinical tool that can be used to counteract the negative effects of arthrogenic muscle inhibition, which is believed to limit the effectiveness of therapeutic exercise. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is commonly accepted as a strengthening modality, but its ability to simultaneously serve as a disinhibitory treatment is not as well established.

Clinical Question:

Does NMES effectively enhance quadriceps voluntary activation in patients with orthopedic knee conditions?

Summary of Key Findings:

Four randomized controlled trials (RCTs) met the inclusion criteria and were included. Of those, 1 reported statistically significant improvements in quadriceps voluntary activation in the intervention group relative to a comparison group, but the statistical significance was not true for another study consisting of the same sample of participants with a different follow-up period. One study reported a trend in the NMES group, but the between-groups differences were not statistically significant in 3 of the 4 RCTs.

Clinical Bottom Line:

Current evidence does not support the use of NMES for the purpose of enhancing quadriceps voluntary activation in patients with orthopedic knee conditions.

Strength of Recommendation:

There is level B evidence that the use of NMES alone or in conjunction with therapeutic exercise does not enhance quadriceps voluntary activation in patients with orthopedic knee conditions (eg, anterior cruciate ligament injuries, osteoarthritis, total knee arthroplasty).

Open access

Pier Paolo Mariani, Luca Laudani, Jacopo E. Rocchi, Arrigo Giombini and Andrea Macaluso

underlying factor contributing to this problem is the arthrogenic muscle inhibition, which remains understudied. Different studies 15 – 17 have demonstrated that muscular wasting occurs mainly during the first postoperative month, suggesting that there is a surgically induced effect that occurs immediately

Restricted access

Igor E.J. Magalhães, Rinaldo A. Mezzarane and Rodrigo L. Carregaro

adopted in their study. 24 Similarly, Kim et al 15 analyzed the effects of elastic taping on quadriceps activation during MVIC in individuals presenting arthrogenic muscle INHI due to knee injury. The subjects were separated into 2 groups (KT and Sham), and the KT group was submitted to a FAC application

Restricted access

Gulcan Harput, Volga B. Tunay and Matthew P. Ithurburn

rehabilitation program, as well as making decisions regarding return to sport. 7 , 9 , 19 , 24 , 25 Quadriceps strength loss, which is thought to be due to muscle atrophy, arthrogenic muscle inhibition, and an overall decrease in physical activity, is inevitable after ACLR. 7 , 8 , 18 , 26 Hamstring strength

Restricted access

Gabrielle Stubblefield, Jeffrey Tilly and Kathy Liu

of ankle sprain does not lead to an increase in ligament laxity . Clin J Sport Med . 2013 ; 23 ( 6 ): 483 – 487 . PubMed ID: 23917734 doi:10.1097/JSM.0b013e31829afc03 10.1097/JSM.0b013e31829afc03 13. Palmieri R , Ingersoll C , Stone M , et al . Arthrogenic muscle response to a simulated