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James C. Martin, Steven J. Elmer, Robert D. Horscroft, Nicholas A.T. Brown and Barry B. Shultz

The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate an alternative method for determining the position of the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) during cycling. The approach used in this study employed an instrumented spatial linkage (ISL) system to determine the position of the ASIS in the parasagittal plane. A two-segment ISL constructed using aluminum segments, bearings, and digital encoders was tested statically against a calibration plate and dynamically against a video-based motion capture system. Four well-trained cyclists provided data at three pedaling rates. Statically, the ISL had a mean horizontal error of 0.03 ± 0.21 mm and a mean vertical error of −0.13 ± 0.59 mm. Compared with the video-based motion capture system, the agreement of the location of the ASIS had a mean error of 0.30 ± 0.55 mm for the horizontal dimension and −0.27 ± 0.60 mm for the vertical dimension. The ISL system is a cost-effective, accurate, and valid measure for two-dimensional kinematic data within a range of motion typical for cycling.

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Manuel Trinidad-Fernández, Manuel González-Sánchez and Antonio I. Cuesta-Vargas

prevented any change in the abduction angle arm due to fatigue. The transducer was fixed to an articulated arm. Figure 3 —Acquisition of data of human measurements: (A) standard arm position and (B) 120° shoulder abduction. On the same day, 8 images per position were recorded, not interleaved, with sensor

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Daniela Corbetta, Rebecca F. Wiener, Sabrina L. Thurman and Emalie McMahon

analyses of the arm movements, Thelen et al. ( 1993 ) found that during their first reaching attempts, infants did not quite know how to properly calibrate the speed of their articulated arm to the intended location of the target goal. Thelen et al. ( 1993 ) also observed that infants approached the