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Garrison A. Chan and Dale R. Wagner

Key Points ▸ The National Athletic Trainers’ Association position statement recommends monitoring wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) for heat risk assessment. ▸ A total of 72% of National Collegiate Athletic Association Football Bowl Subdivision athletic training staffs monitor WBGT. ▸ Common

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William Bell

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the pubertal characteristics of a group of specialist association football (soccer) players (N = 22) between the ages of 12.3 and 15.3 years. Pubertal status was assessed by direct observation of pubic hair (PH), and peak height velocity (PHV) was assessed using graphic procedures. The ages at which the various stages of PH were reached did not differ between playing positions or between players as a whole and the control group. The length of the interval between sequential stages of PH was about a year and between PH2 and PH5 was 2.5 years. Correlations between the age at PHV and each of the pubertal stages were generally high. It was concluded that the influence of participation in competitive association football had no significant effect on the attainment and progress of pubertal development beyond that expected by normal growth.

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Alexander David Blackett, Adam B. Evans and David Piggott

between elite athlete and high-performance coach is as logical, simplistic and unproblematic as previously inferred. The aim of this study, therefore, is to provide the field with an original contribution by better understanding the experiences of whether fast-tracked coaches within men’s association

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Adam Jones, Chris Brogden, Richard Page, Ben Langley and Matt Greig

Association Football? J Sci Med Sport . 2016 ; 19 ( 7 ): 547 – 552 . PubMed ID: 26209426 doi: 10.1016/j.jsams.2015.07.009 26209426 2. Andersson H , Ekblom B , Krustrup P . Elite football on artificial turf versus natural grass: movement patterns, technical standards, and player impressions . J

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Iñigo Mujika, Juanma Santisteban, Paco Angulo and Sabino Padilla

A 7-week, 10-session individual training program was implemented with a youth elite football (soccer) player who had been underperforming because of poor aerobic fitness. The intervention focused on developing aerobic power and high lactate production and contributed to a 32.3% improvement in a football-specific performance test. The player was able to return to play and exceed expected performance levels during competitive match play.

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Laura A. Garvican, Kristal Hammond, Matthew C. Varley, Christopher J. Gore, Francois Billaut and Robert J. Aughey

Purpose:

This study investigated the decrement in running performance of elite soccer players competing at low altitude and time course for abatement of these decrements.

Methods:

Twenty elite youth soccer players had their activity profile, in a sea-level (SL) and 2 altitude (Alt, 1600 m, d 4, and d 6) matches, measured with a global positioning system. Measures expressed in meters per minute of match time were total distance, low- and high-velocity running (LoVR, 0.01–4.16 m/s; HiVR, 4.17–10.0 m/s), and frequency of maximal accelerations (>2.78 m/s2). The peak and subsequent stanza for each measure were identified and a transient fatigue index calculated. Mean heart rate (HR) during the final minute of a submaximal running task (5 min, 11 km/h) was recorded at SL and for 10 d at Alt. Differences were determined between SL and Alt using percentage change and effect-size (ES) statistic with 90% confidence intervals.

Results:

Mean HR almost certainly increased on d 1 (5.4%, ES 1.01 ± 0.35) and remained probably elevated on both d 2 (ES 0.42 ± 0.31) and d3 (ES 0.30 ± 0.25), returning to baseline at d 5. Total distance was almost certainly lower than SL (ES –0.76 ± 0.37) at d 4 and remained probably reduced on d 6 (ES –0.42 ± 0.36). HiVR probably decreased at d 4 vs SL (–0.47 ± 0.59), with no clear effect of altitude at d 6 (–0.08 ± 0.41). Transient fatigue in matches was evident at SL and Alt, with a possibly greater decrement at Alt.

Conclusion:

Despite some physiological adaptation, match running performance of youth soccer players is compromised for at least 6 d at low altitude.

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Martin Buchheit, Ben M. Simpson, Esa Peltola and Alberto Mendez-Villanueva

The aim of the present study was to locate the fastest 10-m split time (Splitbest) over a 40-m sprint in relation to age and maximal sprint speed in highly trained young soccer players. Analyses were performed on 967 independent player sprints collected in 223 highly trained young football players (Under 12 to Under 18). The maximal sprint speed was defined as the average running speed during Splitbest. The distribution of the distance associated with Splitbest was affected by age (X 2 3 = 158.7, P < .001), with the older the players, the greater the proportion of 30-to-40-m Splitbest. There was, however, no between-group difference when data were adjusted for maximal sprint speed. Maximal sprint speed is the main determinant of the distance associated with Splitbest. Given the important disparity in Splitbest location within each age group, three (U12-U13) to two (U14-U18) 10-m intervals are still required to guarantee an accurate evaluation of maximal sprint speed in young players when using timing gates.