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G. Cornelis van Kooten

The purpose in this paper is to examine the effectiveness/usefulness of the long-term athlete development (LTAD) model, particularly in the coaching of judo. The major influences on the LTAD approach, including deliberate practice, are reviewed along with recent evidence that leads to questions about the usefulness of the LTAD model. While Judo Canada has attempted to implement this model in its program to train coaches, there remains a great deal of incongruity between the LTAD approach and the pedagogy that often characterizes judo.

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Lea-Cathrin Dohme, David Piggott, Susan Backhouse and Gareth Morgan

athletes (e.g.,  MacNamara, Button, & Collins, 2010a ). Despite similarities between the PSCs facilitative of youth athletesdevelopment and elite athletic performance to be expected, it is important to distinguish the psychological needs of adult and youth athlete populations. Particularly, experts have

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Christoph Szedlak, Matthew Smith, Melissa Day and Bettina Callary

they make to athlete development and preparation for sport-specific performance ( UKSCA, 2016 ). In summary, the S&C coaching role in elite sport has achieved an increased level of importance in the last few years. Given the suggested importance credited to S&C, it is imperative to gain an

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Popi Sotiriadou, Jessie Brouwers, Veerle De Bosscher and Graham Cuskelly

Previous studies acknowledge the importance of sporting organizations’ developing partnerships with clubs for athlete development purposes. However, there are no studies that address the way partnerships influence athlete progression and pathways. This study explores interorganizational relationships (IORs) between a tennis federation and tennis clubs in their efforts to improve player development processes. Document analysis and semistructured interviews with representatives from clubs and the Flemish federation were used. The findings show that the federation and the clubs engaged in IORs to achieve reciprocity and efficiency. The federation anticipated gaining legitimacy and asymmetry, and clubs expected to develop stability. Formal and informal control mechanisms facilitated IOR management. The conceptual model discussed in this study shows the types of IOR motives, management, and control mechanisms that drive and influence the attraction, retention/ transition, and nurturing processes of athlete development.

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Daniel Wigfield and Ryan Snelgrove

In March 2017, responding to a pressure to improve athlete development and enjoyment, Hockey Canada moved to change how youth are introduced to hockey by mandating the implementation of a cross-ice development program for its entry-level participants. The mandate of cross-ice programming was to ensure that all 75,000 entry-level participants received increased touches of the puck on an appropriately sized playing surface; thus, heightening their spatial awareness and foundational skills necessary to enjoyably move forward in hockey. As is common for many sport organizations, the proposed programming changes were met with resistance by some stakeholders. Surprisingly, the resistance to the programming changes evolved into a much-publicized intergroup conflict within Hockey Canada’s largest market. The dispute could not be resolved in time for the beginning of the 2017–2018 season. As a result, the defiant local leagues were granted a one-year reprieve from implementing cross-ice programming. With only a one-year reprieve granted, Hockey Canada must now determine the appropriate steps to fully implement their desired programming change and ensure that resistance-based conflicts are limited in the future.

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Eric W. MacIntosh and Popi Sotiriadou

Athlete development involves the attraction, retention, transition, and nurturing phases of athletes at the talented, pre-elite, and elite levels ( Sotiriadou & Shilbury, 2009 ). These athlete development phases are a topic of growing research interest in the high-performance sport world ( Brouwers

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Mathew Dowling and Marvin Washington

This investigation examined how a network of knowledge-based professionals—the Canadian Sport for Life Leadership Team (CS4LLT)—as a newly emerging organizational form was able to influence the Canadian sport policy and governance process in an attempt to reshape Canadian sport. The analysis draws upon the epistemic community approach (Haas, 1992; Haas & Adler, 1992) and empirical data collected as part of an in-depth case study examination into the leadership team and senior Sport Canada officials. The findings support the notion that the CS4LLT, as a network of knowledge-based professionals with legitimated and authoritative and policy-relevant expertise (epistemic community), was able to influence the Canadian sport policy process through (i) influencing key governmental actors by (re)framing policy-relevant issues and (ii) establishing knowledge/truth claims surrounding athlete development, which, in turn, enabled direct and indirect involvement in and influence over the sport policy renewal process. More broadly, the study draws attention to the potential role and importance of knowledge-based professional networks as a fluid, dynamic, and responsive approach to organizing and managing sport that can reframe policy debates, insert ideas, and enable policy learning.

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Christopher M. McLeod and Calvin Nite

governed. Scholars have also considered how new sports systems influence athlete development. Woolf, Berg, Newland, and Green ( 2016 ) found mixed martial art (MMA) gyms were responsible for developing new fighters because there was no league-driven development system. Gym managers and coaches tried to

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Nima Dehghansai and Joseph Baker

look at the data indicated that some athletes currently continue to compete in recreational-level open settings. There is limited research on whether a more inclusive environment is more beneficial to athletesdevelopment (i.e., opportunity to test skills against people with various skills) or whether

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Ashley M. Duguay, Todd M. Loughead and Krista J. Munroe-Chandler

The purpose of the current study was to develop, implement, and evaluate a season-long athlete leadership development program. Participants were 27 female varsity athletes who participated in four leadership workshops throughout the season, each 1 hr in duration. All of the participants completed inventories measuring leadership behaviors, cohesion, communication, athlete satisfaction, and peer motivational climate. Overall, the results showed significant differences in regards to leadership behaviors, athlete satisfaction, and peer motivational climate from pre- to postintervention. Further, follow-up focus groups were also conducted to assess the social validity of the leadership development program. These focus groups revealed important insight into program structure, influence of the program, leadership challenges, and suggestions for future improvements. These findings provide researchers, sport psychology consultants, and coaches with important information regarding the effectiveness of this athlete leadership development program in targeting human and social capital development.