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Evangelos Galanis, Antonis Hatzigeorgiadis, Nikos Comoutos, Fedra Charachousi and Xavier Sanchez

examining the effects of distractions, Hohmann, Exner, and Schott ( 2016 ) investigated the temporal congruence between physical execution and motor imagery in a Timed-Up and-Go-Test type of task, under neutral and auditory distraction conditions. They found that auditory distraction negatively affected

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Martin Gérin-Lajoie, Carol L. Richards and Bradford J. McFadyen

This article introduces a novel, ecological, obstructed walking paradigm. Gait adaptations to circumvent obstacles undergoing uncertain displacements, and the effect of revealing the obstacle’s action beforehand, were investigated in young adults. The personal space (PS) maintained during walking was quantified for the first time under different environmental factors including auditory distractions. Obstacle movement and its uncertainty resulted in gait adjustments aimed at gaining time to assess the situation. Early gait adaptations and constant clearances around the obstacle suggest that anticipation and preplanning are involved in such navigational tasks. Participants systematically maintained an elliptical PS during circumvention, but they adjusted its size according to different environmental factors. There was a relationship between the size of PS and level of attention, which suggests that the regulation of PS is used to control locomotion. This novel paradigm has important implications for the assessment and training of locomotor ability within real world environments.

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Philip A. Furley and Daniel Memmert

The controlled attention theory of working memory capacity (WMC, Engle 2002) suggests that WMC represents a domain free limitation in the ability to control attention and is predictive of an individual’s capability of staying focused, avoiding distraction and impulsive errors. In the present paper we test the predictive power of WMC in computer-based sport decision-making tasks. Experiment 1 demonstrated that high-WMC athletes were better able at focusing their attention on tactical decision making while blocking out irrelevant auditory distraction. Experiment 2 showed that high-WMC athletes were more successful at adapting their tactical decision making according to the situation instead of relying on prepotent inappropriate decisions. The present results provide additional but also unique support for the controlled attention theory of WMC by demonstrating that WMC is predictive of controlling attention in complex settings among different modalities and highlight the importance of working memory in tactical decision making.

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Mike Stoker, Ian Maynard, Joanne Butt, Kate Hays and Paul Hughes

and light manipulations were considered. However, given that there are consistently indiscriminate auditory distractions at competition (cf. Driskell, Sclafani, & Driskell, 2014 ) and that previous research has used such a stressor ( Stoker et al., 2017 ), we used a sound stressor. Thus

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Ramesh Kaipa, Bethany Howard, Roha Kaipa, Eric Turcat and Laurielle Prema

received Institutional Review Board approval at Oklahoma State University, and all participants provided written consent to participate in the experiment. The experiment was conducted in a spacious laboratory space that was free from visual and auditory distractions with participants seated in an office