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Stefanie Klatt and Nicholas J. Smeeton

fencers was not better than in nonexpert fencers when only visual information was provided. However, the experts were better able to make use of auditory information when no visual information was provided and to filter out (uninformative) auditory stimuli compared with novices. Thus, auditory information

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Takehide Kimura and Ryouta Matsuura

-task interference ( Heinzel et al., 2017 ; Kimura et al., 2017 ), but, to the best of our knowledge, the effect of WM training using auditory stimuli (auditory WM training) on dual-task interference has not been clarified. A neuroimaging study showed that auditory WM training more greatly activated other brain

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Rachel L. Wright, Joseph W. Bevins, David Pratt, Catherine M. Sackley and Alan M. Wing

lower scores on the Berg Balance Scale 18 ; therefore, it is possible that gait asymmetry is a contributing factor to the high incidence of falls in individuals poststroke during walking. Auditory rhythm can produce an effect on the motor system 19 , 20 and lower limb movements, such as stepping, can

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Tatsuya Daikoku, Yuji Takahashi, Nagayoshi Tarumoto and Hideki Yasuda

Statistical learning is thought to be a domain-general, implicit, and automatic learning process that lies at the heart of the adaptive behavioral repertoire of every complex organism ( Perruchet & Pacton, 2006 ; Saffran, Aslin, & Newport, 1996 ). Auditory statistical learning can be retained even

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Rena F. Hale, Sandor Dorgo, Roger V. Gonzalez and Jerome Hausselle

feedback has limited application as it is expensive and is cognitively demanding, which limits the ability to control multiple parameters simultaneously. 2 , 3 Auditory feedback is cost-effective and is an easy to implement training modality in correcting spatial and temporal movement patterns such as

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Guneet Chawla, Madelon Hoppe, Nina Browner and Michael D. Lewek

The characteristic short, shuffling steps and tendency of individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD) to freeze during walking are often attributed to diminished automaticity ( Morris, Martin, & Schenkman, 2010 ; Spaulding et al., 2013 ; Wu, Hallett, & Chan, 2015 ). Rhythmic auditory cueing is a

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Joseph P. Winnick and Francis X. Short

The Project UNIQUE Physical Fitness Test was administered to 153 hard of hearing, 892 deaf, and 686 hearing subjects in the age range of 10 to 17 years to contrast their physical fitness status. Relatively few significant differences between groups were found. Only on the sit-up test did hearing subjects surpass the performance of at least one of the two auditory impaired groups in at least two of the three age groups contrasted. Although some gender and age interactions were found on other test items, no clear pattern relative to a comparison of hearing and auditory impaired groups occurred. Age and gender performances within the auditory impaired groups were similar to those expected of hearing groups.

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Eldon E. Snyder

Music is associated with many sport events, yet little research is available on music and sport. The present study considers several musical selections frequently associated with sport with a focus on the meaning these musical selections have to the listeners. Other studies of music and society indicate that music may provide a means of promoting a collective consciousness, social integration, and political ideology. The present study utilizes an auditory elicitation approach. That is, respondents wrote the subjective meanings they associated with the musical selections as they were being played. The selections elicited a variety of meanings and emotions from the respondents. The responses to the music are interpreted within the functionalist, critical, and sociology of emotions/nostalgia frameworks.

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Silvia C. Lipski, Stefanie Unger, Martine Grice and Ingo G. Meister

Adult speakers have developed precise forward models of articulation for their native language and seem to rely less on auditory sensory feedback. However, for learning of the production of new speech sounds, auditory perception provides a corrective signal for motor control. We assessed adult German speakers’ speech motor learning capacity in the absence of auditory feedback but with clear somatosensory information. Learners were presented with a nonnative singleton-geminate duration contrast of voiceless, unaspirated bilabial plosives /p/ vs. /pp/ which is present in Italian. We found that the lack of auditory feedback had no immediate effect but that deviating productions emerged during the course of learning. By the end of training, speakers with masked feedback produced strong lengthening of segments and showed more variation on their production than speakers with normal auditory feedback. Our findings indicate that auditory feedback is necessary for the learning of precise coordination of articulation even if somatosensory feedback is salient.

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Keisuke Tani, Yasutomo Jono, Yoshifumi Nomura, Yuta Chujo and Koichi Hiraoka

This study investigated the effect of monaural auditory stimulus on hand selection when reaching. Healthy right-handed participants were asked to reach to a visual target and were free to use either the right or left hand. A visual target appeared at one of 11 positions in the visual field between -25 and 25 degrees of the horizontal visual angle. An auditory stimulus was given either in the left or right ear 100 ms after the presentation of the visual target, or no auditory stimulus was given. An auditory stimulus in the right ear increased right hand selection, and that in the left ear slightly increased left hand selection when reaching to a target around the midline of the visual field. The horizontal visual angle, where the probabilities of right hand selection and left hand selection were equal when reaching, shifted leftward when an auditory stimulus was given in the right ear, but the angle did not shift in either direction when an auditory stimulus was given in the left ear. The right-ear-dominant auditory stimulus effect on hand selection indicates hemispheric asymmetry of cortical activity for hand selection.