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Sinéad O’Keeffe, Niamh Ní Chéilleachair, and Siobhán O’Connor

necessity for holistic recovery from injury. According to the integrated model of response to sport injury, the psychological reaction to injury is dependent upon situational and personal factors, along with differing behavioral and emotional responses to an injury situation. 17 Fear avoidance, defined as

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Emily R. Hunt, Shelby E. Baez, Anne D. Olson, Timothy A. Butterfield, and Esther Dupont-Versteegden

Key Points ▸ Fear-avoidance and the pain tension cycle contribute to chronic pain. ▸ Massage may modulate physiological and psychological factors associated with pain postinjury. ▸ Breaking the pain tension cycle facilitates progression in rehabilitation and earlier recovery. Pain is often

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Miranda P. Kaye, David E. Conroy, and Angela M. Fifer

This study compared the fear of failure and perfectionism constructs by analyzing their latent structure as well as their motivational antecedents and consequences. College students (N = 372) enrolled in physical activity classes completed a battery of questionnaires assessing fear of failure, perfectionism, approach and avoidance motivational temperaments, and 2 × 2 achievement goals. Structural equation modeling revealed that responses were best summarized by two correlated factors representing perfectionistic strivings and concerns. Avoidance temperament was positively associated with both forms of incompetence avoidance; however, approach temperament was positively related only to perfectionist strivings. Perfectionistic concerns were positively related to the adoption of mastery-avoidance and performance-avoidance goals and negatively related to the adoption of mastery-approach goals. Perfectionistic strivings were positively associated with both approach goals. These results indicate that strivings to avoid incompetence can be distinguished with respect to their latent structure, temperamental antecedents, and motivational consequences.

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Uri Gottlieb and Shmuel Springer

same level of activity 2 years post-SI surgery. Fear of reinjury, changes in preferences and factors associated with mood, social support, and lack of motivation were found to affect return to preinjury activity level. Fear of reinjury may cause avoidance behavior, which may hinder rehabilitation. Fear

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Francesca Genoese, Shelby Baez, and Johanna M. Hoch

of injury-related fear. 7 Injury-related fear is a specific psychological impairment that may include fear of movement, fear of reinjury, or fear-avoidance beliefs. 8 Kinesiophobia, which is fear of movement as a result of vulnerability to reinjury, 9 has been frequently examined as a contextual

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Megan N. Houston, Johanna M. Hoch, and Matthew C. Hoch

, and fear-avoidance beliefs. Currently, the only way to measure such fears is through patient-reported outcomes. For more than 3 decades, the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK) and Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FABQ) have been the predominant instruments used to measure injury-related fear. The

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Johanna M. Hoch, Megan N. Houston, Shelby E. Baez, and Matthew C. Hoch

this population. The most commonly assessed contextual factor in this population to date has been fear of reinjury. 4 , 6 – 9 However, there is a paucity of literature that examines additional contextual factors related to injury-related fear, such as fear-avoidance beliefs (FAB). FAB, specific to a

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Joachim Stoeber, Mark A. Uphill, and Sarah Hotham

The question of how perfectionism affects performance is highly debated. Because empirical studies examining perfectionism and competitive sport performance are missing, the present research investigated how perfectionism affected race performance and what role athletes’ goals played in this relationship in two prospective studies with competitive triathletes (Study 1: N = 112; Study 2: N = 321). Regression analyses showed that perfectionistic personal standards, high performance-approach goals, low performance-avoidance goals, and high personal goals predicted race performance beyond athletes’ performance level. Moreover, the contrast between performance-avoidance and performance-approach goals mediated the relationship between perfectionistic personal standards and performance, whereas personal goal setting mediated the relationship between performance-approach goals and performance. The findings indicate that perfectionistic personal standards do not undermine competitive performance, but are associated with goals that help athletes achieve their best possible performance.

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Tracey Covassin, Bryan Crutcher, R.J. Elbin, Scott Burkhart, and Anthony Kontos

The present study explored the relationship of neurocognitive performance and symptoms to coping responses at 3 and 8 days postconcussion. A total of 104 concussed athletes (M = 16.41, SD = 2.19 years) completed the Immediate Post Concussion Assessment Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) at baseline and the ImPACT and Brief Cope inventory at 3 and 8 days postconcussion. Concussed athletes reported more frequent use of selfdistraction, behavioral disengagement, religion, and self-blame 3 days postconcussion compared with 8 days. Concussed athletes reported more use of avoidance coping at 3 days than 8 days (Wilks’s Lambda =.95, F [1, 100] =4.71, p = .032, η2=.046) post-injury. Total symptoms were also a significant (p = .001) predictor of avoidance coping 3 days postconcussion and decreased visual memory was associated with increased avoidance coping (p = .03) 8 days post-injury. Time since injury likely impacts neurocognitive performance, symptomology, and coping. Clinicians should be aware of higher reported symptoms early and lingering visual memory deficits 1-week post-injury.

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Claudia G. Levenig, Michael Kellmann, Jens Kleinert, Johanna Belz, Tobias Hesselmann, Jahan Heidari, and Monika I. Hasenbring

allowed for the integration of individually tailored approaches to pain treatment. 3 , 5 Hasenbring et al 5 have shown that several subgroups can be distinguished among patients with LBP. A high risk of pain chronification is assumed due to either elevated pain-related fear avoidance or dysfunctional