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Duane Knudson

The evaluation of candidates for faculty appointments, tenure and promotion, grants, and scholarship awards is based on review from peers in their discipline. This expert judgment has been the principal mechanism or gold standard of evaluating research for over 100 years ( Belter, 2015 ; Bornmann

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Andy Gillham, Gary Schofield, Michael Doscher, Dan Dalrymple and Joe Kenn

Traditional examinations of coaching philosophies consider the perspective of sport coaches (e.g., soccer, cricket, rugby). The focus on sport coaches’ coaching philosophy has advanced the study of coaching effectiveness while simultaneously omitting strength and conditioning coaches from the larger body of literature on coaching philosophy. The purpose of this paper is to reveal how award winning strength and conditioning coaches shape and use their coaching philosophy. The participants include four renowned strength and conditioning coaches, one at the high school, one at the college, and two at the professional level. A summary is provided at the end that examines commonalities (e.g., all the respondents expressed the need to have a specific coaching philosophy) and differences (e.g., how discipline factors into their coaching philosophy) across the respondents’ views and connects their viewpoints to the broader literature on sport coaching.

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Jill L. McNitt-Gray

, in particular, sports biomechanics. I would like to thank the American Society of Biomechanics for the 2016 Jim Hay Memorial Award and the Journal of Applied Biomechanics for this opportunity to share some of the insights we, as members of the University of Southern California Biomechanics Research

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Doris R. Corbett

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E. Jane Watkinson and Sock Miang Koh

Moderately mentally handicapped children ages 10 to 12 and youths 13 years and older ran the endurance run of the Canada Fitness Awards Adapted Format under two testing conditions. The current test protocol is one in which subjects select a pace for the entire race and are prompted only by verbal encouragement. A second testing protocol was used in which subjects were paced by a runner at a pace just a bit faster than that displayed during their runs under the current protocol. In the pacing protocol, instructors ran in front of the subjects and verbally and visually prompted them to keep up. The objective of the pacing protocol was to reduce the degree to which the subjects had to plan their runs, and to increase motivation to continue. Completion rates improved with the pacing protocol for both groups. Completion times improved for the younger group. Heart rate responses under both testing conditions were very high and small differences were observed between the two conditions in this dependent variable. Heart rates of subjects in both conditions were at vigorous to severe intensity levels throughout the runs, indicating that subjects were lacking in fitness and were performing at or near maximal capacities.

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Edited by Thomas Rowland

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Edited by Thomas Rowland

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Edited by Thomas W. Rowland

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Thomas Rowland