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David B. Creel, Leslie M. Schuh, Robert L. Newton Jr, Joseph J. Stote and Brenda M. Cacucci

Little is known about the cardiorespiratory fitness of patients awaiting bariatric surgery. Although it can be assumed that exercise endurance is limited among the morbidly obese individuals, few investigators have quantified these limitations. Those studies that have examined exercise tolerance

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James Annesi

well as increased physical activity, were identified. 6 Although bariatric surgery as a treatment for severe obesity in both adults and adolescents is increasing, 12 , 13 an improved understanding of the psychosocial bases of changes in weight-loss behaviors might increase success with nonsurgical

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Dale S. Bond, Hollie A. Raynor, J. Graham Thomas, Jessica Unick, Jennifer Webster, Beth Ryder and Sivamainthan Vithiananthan

Background:

This study examines whether performance of bout-related physical activity (PA) during morning hours is related to greater overall bout-related PA increases within a preoperative PA intervention for bariatric surgery (BS) patients.

Methods:

Participants with severe obesity (n = 33; mean age = 45.6 ± 9.6 years; BMI = 45.7 ± 7.0 kg/m2) seeking BS were randomized to and completed 6 weeks of preoperative PA counseling (retention = 82.5%). Participants were encouraged to walk daily at a moderate intensity in bouts ≥ 10 minutes during morning hours to overcome time-related obstacles and establish a PA habit. Timing and amount of bout-related moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) was assessed via objective monitor at pre- and postintervention.

Results:

Greater proportion of bout-related MVPA performed during morning hours (4:00 AM–12:00 PM) at postintervention was associated with larger total increases in bout-related MVPA minutes/day (β = .40, P = .03). At postintervention, a greater proportion of participants whose longest MVPA bouts occurred during morning hours (n = 11) achieved the public health guideline (ie, ≥150 bout-related MVPA minutes/week) versus those whose longest MVPA bouts occurred during nonmorning hours (n = 19; 63.6% vs. 26.3%, P = .04).

Conclusions:

Intervention-related increases in PA tended to be greatest when PA was performed in the morning. Morning exercise may be a viable strategy for promoting habitual PA in inactive BS patients.

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Farah A. Ramirez-Marrero, John Miles, Michael J. Joyner and Timothy B. Curry

Background:

This study aimed to 1) describe physical activity (PA) in 15 post gastric bypass surgery (GB), 16 obese (Ob), and 14 lean (L) participants (mean ± se: age = 37.1 ± 1.6, 30.8 ± 1.9, 32.7 ± 2.3 yrs.; BMI = 29.7 ± 1.2, 38.2 ± 0.8, 22.9 ± 0.5 kg/m2, respectively); and 2) test associations between PA, body composition, and cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max).

Methods:

Participants completed a PA questionnaire after wearing accelerometers from 5–7 days. Body composition was determined with DEXA and CT scans, and VO2max with open circuit spirometry. ANOVA was used to detect differences between groups, and linear regressions to evaluate associations between PA (self-reported, accelerometer), body composition, and VO2max.

Results:

Self-reported moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) in GB, Ob, and L participants was 497.7 ± 215.9, 988.6 ± 230.8, and 770.7 ± 249.3 min/week, respectively (P = .51); accelerometer MVPA was 185.9 ± 41.7, 132.3 ± 51.1, and 322.2 ± 51.1 min/week, respectively (P = .03); and steps/day were 6647 ± 141, 6603 ± 377, and 9591 ± 377, respectively (P = .03). Ob showed a marginally higher difference between self-report and accelerometer MVPA (P = .06). Accelerometer-MVPA and steps/day were inversely associated with percent fat (r = –0.53, –0.46), and abdominal fat (r = –0.36, –0.40), and directly associated with VO2max (r = .36).

Conclusions:

PA was similar between GB and Ob participants, and both were less active than L. Higher MVPA was associated with higher VO2max and lower body fat.

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Luana Farias de Oliveira, Bryan Saunders and Guilherme Giannini Artioli

occurs in the stomach, which, when they reach the ileum and colon, can irritate the intestinal mucosa and cause osmotic fluctuations leading to diarrhea ( Kahle et al., 2013 ). Thus, avoiding neutralization of SB may also minimize intestinal discomfort. Bariatric surgery is an effective weight loss

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Arya M. Sharma, Donna L. Goodwin and Janice Causgrove Dunn

, exercise, medication, or even bariatric surgery, the weight often comes back. Thus, obesity behaves just like any other chronic disease that requires long-term, often lifelong management. What Is the Role of Bariatric Surgery in Obesity Management? Currently, bariatric surgery is considered to be the only

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Lindsay P. Toth, Susan Park, Whitney L. Pittman, Damla Sarisaltik, Paul R. Hibbing, Alvin L. Morton, Cary M. Springer, Scott E. Crouter and David R. Bassett

, & Hill, 2010 ; Colley et al., 2011 ; Dwyer et al., 2007 ), to assess the effect of treatment regimens (e.g., ankle arthroplasty, bariatric surgery, physical rehabilitation) on physical activity ( Assal et al., 2011 ; Boone & Coleman, 2006 ; King et al., 2012 ), and to track participants in physical

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Seung-uk Ko, Gerald J. Jerome, Eleanor M. Simonsick and Luigi Ferrucci

patterns during flat ground walking and obstacle crossing 1 year after bariatric surgery . Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases, 12 ( 5 ), 1080 – 1085 . PubMed ID: 27320220 doi: 10.1016/j.soard.2016.03.029 Hora , M. , Soumar , L. , Pontzer , H. , & Sladek , V. ( 2017 ). Body size and

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Sheri J. Hartman, Catherine R. Marinac, Lisa Cadmus-Bertram, Jacqueline Kerr, Loki Natarajan, Suneeta Godbole, Ruth E. Patterson, Brittany Morey and Dorothy D. Sears

or recurrent invasive cancer within the last 10 years (other than nonmelanomic skin cancer or carcinoma of the cervix in situ), were over 85 years of age, recently had bariatric surgery, were taking insulin or corticosteroid medications, or were diabetic. Participants attended one in-person study

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David R. Bassett, Patty S. Freedson and Dinesh John

, obesity researchers at Yale University Medical School placed Fitbits on the nondominant wrists of patients who underwent bariatric surgery (M. Stults-Kolehmainen, personal communication, June 1, 2017). In order to transfer the activity tracker data into the EMR, the weekly averages for steps per day were