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Ya-Wen Hsu, Chih-Ping Chou, Selena T. Nguyen-Rodriguez, Arianna D. McClain, Britni R. Belcher and Donna Spruijt-Metz

Background:

A profound decline in physical activity occurs in puberty. This phenomenon is not well understood. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to examine associations between family/friend social support for physical activity, negative meanings of physical activity (NMPA), and internal /external barriers to physical activity with moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and sedentary and light behavior (SLB) in youth.

Methods:

A total of 350 participants from 7 Los Angeles County middle schools participated in the study (62% Latina, 79% females). Hypothesized pathways were examined using structural equation modeling. Psychosocial variables and participation in MVPA and SLB were assessed by self-reported questionnaires.

Results:

NMPA were related to lower levels of family/friend social support and greater internal/external barriers. Family social support was the only significant indicator of MVPA (β = 0.79). Low family social support was related to higher SLB (β = −0.25).

Conclusions:

Family social support seems crucial to promote MVPA and reduce SLB in adolescents and might be influenced by child’s feelings about physical activity. Future research should consider the interrelationship between psychosocial correlates of physical activity.

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Claire R. Jenkin, Rochelle M. Eime, Hans Westerbeek and Jannique G.Z. van Uffelen

active. To develop effective physical activity strategies, the barriers to, as well as the benefits of, physical activity participation for older adults needs to be better understood. The majority of the research investigating the benefits of, and the barriers to, physical activity participation for

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Katie J. Lyman, Michael McCrone, Thomas A. Hanson, Christopher D. Mellinger and Kara Gange

of cryotherapy are duration of treatment, amount of adipose tissue, anatomical location, and modality employed. 2 In addition, a barrier between the ice and skin, such as a cast, splint, or tape, may require longer treatment applications to achieve any therapeutic benefits. 18 – 21 Consequently

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Emma Burnett, Jenny White and Joanna Scurr

Background:

The importance of physical activity is well known.1 However, previous research suggests that breast movement during exercise can be painful, embarrassing, and anecdotally deter exercise participation.2,3 Therefore, this research investigates whether the breast influences physical activity participation.

Methods:

Female respondents (n = 249) completed a breast health and physical activity survey assessing bras and bra fit, physical activity, breast pain, comments and improvements, breast history, and demographics.

Results:

Results found that the breast was a barrier to physical activity participation for 17% of women. “I can’t find the right sports bra” and “I am embarrassed by excessive breast movement” were the most influential breast related barriers to activity. Breast pain increased with vigorous activity and poor breast support. Breast health knowledge increased the use of a sports bra and levels of physical activity.

Conclusions:

The breast was the fourth greatest barrier to physical activity, behind energy/motivation (first), time constraints (second), and health (third), despite its omission from previous physical activity literature. As 33% of women were not meeting physical activity guidelines, increasing breast health knowledge may reduce barriers to physical activity.

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Tanya Prewitt-White, Christopher P. Connolly, Yuri Feito, Alexandra Bladek, Sarah Forsythe, Logan Hamel and Mary Ryan McChesney

White ( 2002 ) suggested that trained pregnant athletes are likely able to safely engage in activities beyond the conservative intensities previously recommended by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) ( Artal & O’toole, 2003 ). Given the many barriers to physical activity

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Kami N. Thews, Zachary K. Winkelmann, Lindsey E. Eberman, Kirsten A. Potts and Kenneth E. Games

Key Points ▸ Firefighters experience many perceived barriers, both cultural and structural, when attempting to report mental or behavioral illness. ▸ The most challenging perceived barriers reported by firefighters included the fear of letting their fellow firefighters down and the inability to

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Nicola Brown and Yasmin Bowmer

-Tilaki & Heidari, 2006 ). This highlights the need for women to be supported in increasing their PA levels. In order to develop optimal PA interventions, it is important to identify the barriers and motivators to engage in PA. Typically, individuals who perceive more exercise benefits and fewer exercise barriers

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Gabriella McLoughlin, Courtney Weisman Fecske, Yvette Castaneda, Candace Gwin and Kim Graber

participate and who have risen to an elite level. Although the field of adapted sport is growing, there is a paucity of research on motivations, facilitators, and barriers for sport participation among individuals with physical disabilities competing at an elite level. Furthermore, less is known about how

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Karl Spiteri, David Broom, Amira Hassan Bekhet, John Xerri de Caro, Bob Laventure and Kate Grafton

sport or strength training, or unstructured, such as while doing household chores. The determinants of PA differ depending on the type of activity ( Koeneman, Verheijden, Chinapaw, & Hopman-Rock, 2011 ). Previous systematic reviews have identified the barriers and motivators toward PA or exercise

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Aysha M. Thomas, Kayleigh M. Beaudry, Kimbereley L. Gammage, Panagiota Klentrou and Andrea R. Josse

identified several common perceived barriers to PA and assessed correlates/determinates of PA participation in adolescent and adult populations. 3 , 6 , 15 – 20 Generally, they can be divided into intrapersonal, interpersonal, and structural factors, although this is not the only way to classify these