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Gary S. Goldfield

Objective:

To compare liking and other attitudes toward physical activity (PA) and television (TV) viewing versus PA behavior and time viewing TV at baseline as predictors of response to lifestyle intervention in 30, 8 to 12 year old overweight/obese children.

Method:

Secondary analyses from a randomized controlled trial designed to increase PA and reduce sedentary behavior. PA was measured by accelerometers worn by participants every day for 8 weeks. TV viewing at baseline and during intervention was assessed by self-report.

Results:

Multiple regression analyses showed that base rates of PA and TV viewing significantly predicted changes in PA (Beta = .39, P < .05) and TV viewing (Beta = .37, P < .05) during the intervention, even after statistically controlling for child age, gender, body mass index, as well as baseline attitudes and liking of PA and TV viewing. However, self-reported liking of TV viewing and PA, perceived adequacy, and predilection were not predictive of response to intervention.

Conclusions:

Baseline measure of PA and TV viewing behaviors may be better predictors of response to lifestyle intervention than measure of liking and other attitudinal variables of PA. The theoretical and clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

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Katie Smith, L. Lanningham-Foster, Amy Welch, and Christina Campbell

Background:

Innovative methods are warranted to optimize prenatal outcomes. This study’s objective was to determine if a web-based behavioral intervention (BI) can prevent excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) by increasing physical activity (PA).

Methods:

Participants were randomized to usual care (UC; n = 21) or BI (n = 24) between 10 to 14 weeks gestation. GWG, PA, and diet were assessed at baseline, mid-, and late pregnancy.

Results:

No differences in GWG or adherence to GWG recommendations presented between groups. Total UC MET-minutes significantly decreased from baseline to late-pregnancy (1,234 ± 372 MET-minutes, P = .013). Mid-pregnancy sustained PA was greater for BI than UC (20-minute PA bouts: 122 ± 106 vs. 46 ± 48 minutes/week, P = .005; 30-minute PA bouts: 74 ± 70 vs. 14 ± 24 minutes/week, P < .001), and greater for BI at mid-pregnancy compared with baseline (20-minute PA bouts: 61.3 ± 21.9; 30-minute PA bouts: 39.6 ± 14.8, both P < .05). BI energy intake at mid-pregnancy significantly increased from baseline (336 ± 127 kcals, P = .04) and was significantly greater than UC (2,503 ± 703 vs. 1,894 ± 594, P = .005).

Conclusions:

Sedentary pregnant women should increase PA but may need additional dietary counseling to prevent excessive GWG.

Open access

Andrew P. Kingsnorth, Mhairi Patience, Elena Moltchanova, Dale W. Esliger, Nicola J. Paine, and Matthew Hobbs

gross domestic product in 2020 is starting to be estimated ( The World Bank, 2020 ), many of the other and longer-term effects of COVID-19 remain unknown. The U.K. government enforced behavioral “lockdown” restrictions on the March 23, 2020 which required individuals to stay at home and only to leave

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Roseane de Fátima Guimarães, Marie-Eve Mathieu, Ryan E.R. Reid, Mélanie Henderson, and Tracie Ann Barnett

cardiovascular mortality. 2 , 3 The transition from adolescence to adulthood are periods during which health-related behaviors are changed and established, 4 persisting into adulthood. 5 Therefore, it is essential to study adolescence as an important phase of life rather than assume that behavioral patterns

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Thorben Hülsdünker, Clara Rentz, Diemo Ruhnow, Hannes Käsbauer, Heiko K. Strüder, and Andreas Mierau

focused on behavioral parameters, while potential neurophysiologic adaptations underlying superior visuomotor performance following stroboscopic training remained unconsidered. As our previous studies specifically suggested that the motion-sensitive area MT affects visuomotor reaction time, 4 , 8

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Samuel Mettler, Georgette Lehner, and Gareth Morgan

 al., 2016 ). However, there are no data available so far about supplement use and behavior among any young or adult elite Swiss athlete cohorts. To gain more insight into the supplementation behavior of adolescent elite athletes, we aimed to investigate the prevalence of supplement use among adolescent

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Scott Strath, Raymond Isaacs, and Michael J. Greenwald

This qualitative study describes environmental supports and barriers to physical activity in an older adult sample drawn from low- and high-walkable neighborhoods. Thirty-seven individuals age 55 and over were recruited and answered open-ended survey questions, with a subsample invited back to partake in a semistructured interview. Content analysis identified categories and themes linking perceptions of neighborhood-environment characteristics to activity. Emerging categories and themes did not differ across neighborhood walkability, so results are presented for both groups combined. Infrastructure was the most common category identified to encourage activity, specifically, well-maintained sidewalks, bike paths or lanes, and traffic control. Other categories of land use, landscape, and aesthetics were reported. Poorly maintained or missing sidewalks, crosswalks, bike paths or lanes, and traffic safety were categories that discouraged activity. In conclusion, the information obtained is helpful in solidifying which environmental characteristics are important to measure as they relate to activity behavior in an older adult population.

Open access

Ralph Maddison, Samantha Marsh, Erica Hinckson, Scott Duncan, Sandra Mandic, Rachael Taylor, and Melody Smith

Background:

In this article, we report the grades for the second New Zealand Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth, which represents a synthesis of available New Zealand evidence across 9 core indicators.

Methods:

An expert panel of physical activity (PA) researchers collated and reviewed available nationally representative survey data between March and May 2016. In the absence of new data, (2014–2016) regional level data were used to inform the direction of existing grades. Grades were assigned based on the percentage of children and youth meeting each indicator: A is 81% to 100%; B is 61% to 80%; C is 41% to 60%, D is 21% to 40%; F is 0% to 20%; INC is Incomplete data.

Results:

Overall PA, Active Play, and Government Initiatives were graded B-; Community Environments was graded B; Sport Participation and School Environment received a C+; Sedentary Behaviors and Family/Peer Support were graded C; and Active Travel was graded C-.

Conclusions:

Overall PA participation was satisfactory for young children but not for youth. The grade for PA decreased slightly from the 2014 report card; however, there was an improvement in grades for built and school environments, which may support regional and national-level initiatives for promoting PA.

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Michelle L. Granner, Patricia A. Sharpe, Brent Hutto, Sara Wilcox, and Cheryl L. Addy

Background:

Few studies have explored associations of individual, social, and environmental factors with physical activity and walking behavior.

Methods:

A random-digit-dial questionnaire, which included selected individual, social, and environmental variables, was administered to 2025 adults, age 18 y and older, in two adjacent counties in a southeastern state. Logistic regressions were conducted adjusting for age, race, sex, education, and employment.

Results:

In multivariate models, somewhat different variables were associated with physical activity versus regular walking. Self-efficacy (OR = 19.19), having an exercise partner (OR = 1.47), recreation facilities (OR = 1.54), and safety of trails from crime (OR = 0.72) were associated with physical activity level; while self-efficacy (OR = 4.22), known walking routes (OR = 1.54), recreation facilities (OR = 1.57-1.59), and safety of trails from crime (OR = 0.69) were associated with regular walking behavior.

Conclusions:

Physical activity and walking behaviors were associated with similar variables in this study.

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Katia Ferrar, Carol Maher, John Petkov, and Tim Olds

Background:

To date, most health-related time-use research has investigated behaviors in isolation; more recently, however, researchers have begun to conceptualize behaviors in the form of multidimensional patterns or clusters.

Methods:

The study employed 2 techniques: radar graphs and centroid vector length, angles and distance to quantify pairwise time-use cluster similarities among adolescents living in Australia (N = 1853) and in New Zealand (N = 679).

Results:

Based on radar graph shape, 2 pairs of clusters were similar for both boys and girls. Using vector angles (VA), vector length (VL) and centroid distances (CD), 1 pair for each sex was considered most similar (boys: VA = 63°, VL = 44 and 50 units, and CD = 48 units; girls: VA = 23°, VL = 65 and 85 units, and CD = 36 units). Both methods employed to determine similarity had strengths and weaknesses. Conclusions: The description and quantification of cluster similarity is an important step in the research process. An ability to track and compare clusters may provide greater understanding of complex multidimensional relationships, and in relation to health behavior clusters, present opportunities to monitor and to intervene.