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Enrique Garcia Bengoechea, Francisco Ruiz Juan and Paula Louise Bush

Background:

Worldwide, there is a growing concern with adolescents’ low levels of physical activity (PA). We used a comprehensive social ecological framework to uncover factors associated with leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) among adolescents from southeastern Spain.

Methods:

A population-based sample of 3249 adolescents aged 12–17 participated in a school-based survey in 2006. Potential correlates of participation in and level of LTPA were assessed through self-report. LTPA levels were also self-reported. We used gender-stratified logistic regression models to examine the associations among the variables of interest.

Results:

Consistent with a social ecological perspective, analyses revealed several factors, corresponding to different levels of organization (demographic, biological, psychological, behavioral, social) and behavioral settings (family, peer group, school), significantly associated with LTPA. Some of these factors varied as a function of gender and depending on whether the outcome considered was nonparticipation vs. participation in LTPA or high vs. low level of involvement among participants. Overall, the findings highlight the role of health-related participation motives, significant others’ attitudes toward PA, and grade in physical education as correlates of LTPA in this sample.

Conclusions:

Continued research is necessary to understand the complex interplay of factors and settings associated with adolescent LTPA and the role of gender.

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Michelle C. Kegler, Deanne W. Swan, Iris Alcantara, Louise Wrensford and Karen Glanz

Background:

This study examines the relative contribution of social (eg, social support) and physical (eg, programs and facilities) aspects of worksite, church, and home settings to physical activity levels among adults in rural communities.

Methods:

Data are from a cross-sectional survey of 268 African American and Caucasian adults, ages 40–70, living in southwest Georgia. Separate regression models were developed for walking, moderate, vigorous, and total physical activity as measured in METs-minutes-per-week.

Results:

Social support for physical activity was modest in all 3 settings (mean scores 1.5–1.9 on a 4-point scale). Participants reported limited (<1) programs and facilities for physical activity at their worksites and churches. An interaction of physical and social aspects of the home setting was observed for vigorous and moderate physical activity and total METs. There were also interactions between gender and social support at church for vigorous activity among women, and between race and the physical environment at church for moderate physical activity. A cross-over interaction was found between home and church settings for vigorous physical activity. Social support at church was associated with walking and total METs.

Conclusions:

Homes and churches may be important behavioral settings for physical activity among adults in rural communities.

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Natasha Schranz, Tim Olds, Dylan Cliff, Melanie Davern, Lina Engelen, Billie Giles-Corti, Sjaan Gomersall, Louise Hardy, Kylie Hesketh, Andrew Hills, David Lubans, Doune Macdonald, Rona Macniven, Philip Morgan, Tony Okely, Anne-Maree Parish, Ron Plotnikoff, Trevor Shilton, Leon Straker, Anna Timperio, Stewart Trost, Stewart Vella, Jenny Ziviani and Grant Tomkinson

Background:

Like many other countries, Australia is facing an inactivity epidemic. The purpose of the Australian 2014 Physical Activity Report Card initiative was to assess the behaviors, settings, and sources of influences and strategies and investments associated with the physical activity levels of Australian children and youth.

Methods:

A Research Working Group (RWG) drawn from experts around Australia collaborated to determine key indicators, assess available datasets, and the metrics which should be used to inform grades for each indicator and factors to consider when weighting the data. The RWG then met to evaluate the synthesized data to assign a grade to each indicator.

Results:

Overall Physical Activity Levels were assigned a grade of D-. Other physical activity behaviors were also graded as less than average (D to D-), while Organized Sport and Physical Activity Participation was assigned a grade of B-. The nation performed better for settings and sources of influence and Government Strategies and Investments (A- to a C). Four incompletes were assigned due to a lack of representative quality data.

Conclusions:

Evidence suggests that physical activity levels of Australian children remain very low, despite moderately supportive social, environmental and regulatory environments. There are clear gaps in the research which need to be filled and consistent data collection methods need to be put into place.

Open access

Nicolas Aguilar-Farias, Andrea Cortinez-O’Ryan, Kabir P. Sadarangani, Astrid Von Oetinger, Jaime Leppe, Macarena Valladares, Teresa Balboa-Castillo, Carolina Cobos, Nicolas Lemus, Magdalena Walbaum and Carlos Cristi-Montero

Background:

The 2016 Chilean Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth is a review of the evidence across indicators of behaviors, settings, and sources of influence associated with physical activity (PA) of Chilean children and youth.

Methods:

A Research Work Group reviewed available evidence from publications, surveys, government documents and datasets to assign a grade for 11 indicators for PA behavior based on the percentage of compliance for defined benchmarks. Grades were defined as follows: A, 81% to 100% of children accomplishing a given benchmark; B, 61% to 80%; C, 41% to 60%; D, 21% to 40%; F, 0% to 20%; INC, incomplete data available to assign score.

Results:

Grades assigned were for i) ‘Behaviors that contribute to overall PA levels’: Overall PA, F; Organized Sport Participation, D; Active Play, INC; and Active Transportation, C-; ii) ‘Factors associated with cardiometabolic risk’: Sedentary Behavior, D; Overweight and Obesity, F; Fitness, F; and iii) ‘Factors that influence PA’: Family and Peers, D; School, D; Community and Built Environment, C; Government Strategies and Investments, C.

Conclusions:

Chile faces a major challenge as most PA indicators scored low. There were clear research and information gaps that need to be filled with the implementation of consistent and regular data collection methods.

Open access

Tim Takken, Nynke de Jong and on behalf of the Dutch Physical Activity Report Card Study Group

Participation, Active Play, Active Transportation, and Sedentary Behaviors), Settings and Sources of Influence (Family and Peers, School, Community and Environment, and Government), and health outcomes (Weight Status and Physical Fitness). This Report Card synthesized data from multiple sources to inform the 11

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Javier Brazo-Sayavera, Cecilia del Campo, María José Rodríguez, Inacio Crochemore Mohnsam da Silva, Eugenio Merellano-Navarro and Pedro R. Olivares

, Community and Environment, Government Strategies and Investments). Each of the 10 indicators belongs to 1 of 3 categories: Daily Behaviors (Overall Physical Activity, Organized Sport and Physical Activity Participation, Active Play, Active Transportation, Physical Literacy, Sleep, Sedentary Behaviors

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Arunas Emeljanovas, Brigita Mieziene, Rita Gruodyte-Raciene, Saulius Sukys, Renata Rutkauskaite, Laima Trinkuniene, Natalija Fatkulina and Inga Gerulskiene

literature such as government and nongovernment reports and online content. Methods The 2018 Report Card included the 10 core PA indicators, which represents behaviors (Overall PA, Organized Sport and PA, Active Play, Active Transportation, and Sedentary Behaviors), settings and sources of social influences

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Marianella Herrera-Cuenca, Betty Méndez-Pérez, Maritza Landaeta-Jiménez, Xiomarys Marcano, Evelyn Guilart, Luis Sotillé and Rosalba Romero

, Sedentary Behaviors), Settings and Sources of Influence (Family and Peers, School, Community and Environment), and Strategies and Investments (Government, Nongovernment (NGO), Physical Activity Initiatives for Children and Youth with a Disability). Cardiometabolic Risk was evaluated due to the recent

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Ken Lodewyk and Lauren McNamara

); behavioral (i.e., active recreation, household and occupational activities, and active transport); behavioral settings (i.e., neighborhood, recreation, home, and health care); and policy (i.e., regulations pertaining to transport and parking, zoning, access, and facilities) factors. The natural environment

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Jeffrey J. Milroy, Stephen Hebard, Emily Kroshus and David L. Wyrick

postconcussion symptom inventory in children and adolescents . Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 29 ( 4 ), 348 – 363 . 10.1093/arclin/acu014 Smith , R.E. , & Smoll , F.L. ( 2002 ). Youth sports as a behavior setting for psychosocial interventions . In J.L. Raalte & B.W. Brewer (Eds