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Olivier Girard, Franck Brocherie, Jean-Benoit Morin and Grégoire P. Millet

Purpose:

To determine the intrasession and intersession (ie, within- and between-days) reliability in treadmill sprinting-performance outcomes and associated running mechanics.

Methods:

After familiarization, 13 male recreational sportsmen (team- and racket-sport background) performed three 5-s sprints on an instrumented treadmill with 2 min recovery on 3 different days, 5–7 d apart. Intrasession (comparison of the 3 sprints of the first session) and intersession (comparison of the average of the 3 sprints across days) reliability of performance, kinetics, kinematics, and spring-mass variables were assessed by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficients of variation (CV%).

Results:

Intrasession reliability was high (ICC > .94 and CV < 8%). Intersession reliability was good for performance indices (.83 < ICC < .89 and CV < 10%, yet with larger variability for mean velocity than for distance covered or propulsive power) and kinetic parameters (ICC > .94 and CV < 5%, yet with larger variability for mean horizontal forces than for mean vertical forces) and ranged from good to high for all kinematic (.88 < ICC < .95 and CV ≤ 3.5%) and spring-mass variables (.86 < ICC < .99 and CV ≤ 6.5%). Compared with intrasession, minimal detectable differences were on average twice larger for intersession designs, except for sprint kinetics.

Conclusion:

Instrumented treadmill sprint offers a reliable method of assessing running mechanics during single sprints either within the same session or between days.

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Paul Comfort, Christopher Thomas, Thomas Dos’Santos, Paul A. Jones, Timothy J. Suchomel and John J. McMahon

determine the reliability and variability of DSI ratios calculated based on PF attained during the SJ and CMJ and to compare the resultant DSI values between methods. We hypothesized that both methods would be reliable, both within and between sessions, with greater values derived from DSI-CMJ due to the

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Ian N. Bezodis, David G. Kerwin, Stephen-Mark Cooper and Aki I.T. Salo

’s mean step length values across all sessions. Figure 1 —Within-session mean and SD of step velocity (A), step length (B), and step frequency (C) for athlete A1. For comparison, between-sessions effect sizes are shown with their magnitudes categorized according to Hopkins et al. 22 Statistically

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Paul Comfort, Thomas Dos’Santos, Paul A. Jones, John J. McMahon, Timothy J. Suchomel, Caleb Bazyler and Michael H. Stone

, respectively. 26 Results All force variables demonstrated good to excellent reliability both within and between sessions, with reliability tending to improve across longer time points. CV% values illustrated minimal variability (<2.0%), whereas Hedge g effect sizes highlighted only trivial differences

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Tobias Lundgren, Gustaf Reinebo, Markus Näslund and Thomas Parling

pre and post ACT training in both groups. Training took place at a conference room at the ice hockey organization. The course was conducted during four weeks in February with one training session each week and homework assignments between sessions. An ACT manual adapted for ice hockey players was

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Kelsey Picha, Carolina Quintana, Amanda Glueck, Matt Hoch, Nicholas R. Heebner and John P. Abt

presented in Table  3 . The ICC values were calculated between sessions 1, 2, and 3. The ICC values for each of the 5 protocols illustrated moderate to good reliability 15 between sessions 1, 2, and 3 (.75–.90). The minimal detectable change at a 90% confidence interval of the protocols ranges from 0

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Amador García-Ramos, Alejandro Torrejón, Belén Feriche, Antonio J. Morales-Artacho, Alejandro Pérez-Castilla, Paulino Padial and Guy Gregory Haff

general equation to estimate the XRM from the MV of the barbell, (2) elucidate whether the MV of the barbell can be used to determine the exact number of repetitions left in reserve in a training set, and (3) determine the between-sessions reliability of the MV associated with each XRM. Methods Subjects

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Bent R. Rønnestad, Tue Rømer and Joar Hansen

with the same mean speed as DEC (TRAD). DEC indicates a fast start and declining speed; TRAD constant speed; VO 2 peak, peak oxygen consumption.*Significant difference between sessions ( P  < .05). Figure 2 —Average oxygen consumption for all 5 work intervals during the high-intensity training session

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Koen A.P.M. Lemmink, Kemper Han, Mathieu H.G. de Greef, Piet Rispens and Martin Stevens

Several items of the Groningen Fitness Test for the Elderly (GFE) were tested. The GFE tests were administered twice, with 1 week between sessions. The participants were 458 independently living adults >55 years of age. For most tests, there was reasonable agreement between sessions, indicating absolute objectivity and stability, but results on the block-transfer test revealed a learning effect. Mean scores on the balance-board and sit-and-reach tests showed significant improvement, whereas grip-strength results deteriorated significantly. All tests satisfied the criteria for relative reliability. In conclusion, absolute and relative reliability of the tests of the GFE were satisfactory. If multiple applications of the GFE are planned for the same group of participants, 1 or more practice trials should be executed for the block-transfer test to avoid a learning effect. A standard warm-up protocol is recommended for the sit-and-reach test. Participants should be strongly encouraged to give a maximum effort on the strength tests.

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Olivia R. Barber, Christopher Thomas, Paul A. Jones, John J. McMahon and Paul Comfort

Purpose:

To determine the reliability of the 505 change-of-direction (COD) test performed with both a stationary and a flying start.

Methods:

Fifty-two female netball players (age 23.9 ± 5.4 y, height 169.9 ± 3.3 cm, body mass 65.2 ± 4.6 kg) performed 6 trials of the 505 COD test, 3 with a flying start and 3 with a stationary start, once per week over a 4-wk period to determine within- and between-sessions reliability.

Results:

Testing revealed high within-session reliability for the stationary start (ICC = .96–.97) and for the flying start (ICC = .90–.97). Similarly, both the stationary start (ICC = .965) and the flying start (ICC = .951) demonstrated high reliability between sessions, although repeated-measures analysis of variance (P < .001) revealed learning effects between sessions for both tests. Performances stabilized on day 2 for the static start and on day 3 for the flying start.

Conclusions:

The 505 COD test is a reliable test in female netball players, with either a stationary or flying start. Smallest detectable differences of 3.91% and 3.97% for the stationary start and the flying start, respectively, allow practitioners to interpret whether changes in time taken to complete the 505 COD test reflect genuine improvements in performance or are measurement errors. It is suggested that 1 d of familiarization testing be performed for the stationary start and 2 d of familiarization for the flying start, to minimize learning effects.