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K. Jason Crandall and Patricia A. Eisenman

Binge eating disorder (BED) is a relatively new eating disorder that involves recurrent binge eating without compensatory purging behaviors such as using laxatives, excessive physical activity, and/or dietary restraint. Individuals diagnosed with BED exhibit both psychological and physiological problems that are distinct from bulimia nervosa and non-BED obese individuals. There has been little to no research examining the effects of physical activity on BED treatment. Since current BED treatment strategies have been less than successful, physical activity may be a positive addition to BED treatment. Therefore the objectives of this paper are 1) to raise the awareness of exercise professionals as to. the existence of BED, 2) explore the mechanisms that might support the utilization of physical activity as an adjunct treatment strategy for BED and 3) to prompt more interest among researchers and practitioners relative to using physical activity interventions with BED clients.

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Jessyca N. Arthur-Cameselle and Molly Curcio

), crew ( n  = 1), soccer ( n  = 1), or tennis ( n  = 1). Participants previously met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5; APA, 2013 ) criteria for Anorexia (AN), Bulimia (BN), or Binge Eating Disorder (BED) and all had attended professional treatment. The athletes previously

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Jessyca N. Arthur-Cameselle and Paula A. Quatromoni

The purpose of this study was to characterize recovery experiences of female collegiate athletes who have suffered from eating disorders. Participants were 16 collegiate female athletes who experienced recovery from an eating disorder. Participants told their recovery stories in semistructured interviews regarding factors that initiated, assisted, and hindered recovery. The most common turning point to initiate recovery was experiencing negative consequences from the eating disorder. Factors that most frequently assisted recovery included making cognitive and behavioral changes, supportive relationships, and seeking professional care. Hindering factors most commonly included lack of support from others, professional care complaints, and spending time with others with eating disorders. Results suggested that unique features of the sport environment, including coaches’ behavior and team norms, introduce either positive or negative influences on athletes as they work to recover from an eating disorder. Based on these findings, specific treatment and prevention recommendations for athletes are discussed.

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Fallon R. Mitchell, Sara Santarossa, and Sarah J. Woodruff

). EDs are experienced by approximately 20 million women and 10 million men in America (National Eating Disorders Association [ NEDA], 2018 ). Of the numerous types of EDs, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge-eating disorder are the most common ( NEDA, 2018 ). Anorexia nervosa has a lifetime

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Rachael E. Flatt and Craig Barr Taylor

evaluation and treatment). Sub-clinical and clinical populations offered online treatment in our current model include: Bulimia Nervosa (BN), Binge Eating Disorder (BED), Purging Disorder (PD), Unspecified Feeding and Eating Disorders (UFED), and sub-clinical EDs. The most effective technology

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Laura K. Fewell, Riley Nickols, Amanda Schlitzer Tierney, and Cheri A. Levinson

), bulimia nervosa (BN), eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS), other specified feeding or eating disorder (OSFED; a diagnosis derived from the DSM-V revision which was used during the latter course of the study), binge-eating disorder (BED; also used in conjunction with the release of the DSM

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Jenny H. Conviser, Amanda Schlitzer Tierney, and Riley Nickols

It is estimated that 10 million women in the United States and 1 million men, of diverse gender, ethnicity, socio-cultural origin, socioeconomic status and age will meet diagnostic criteria for ED during their lifetime, including anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), binge eating disorder

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Laura K. Fewell, Riley Nickols, Amanda Schlitzer Tierney, and Cheri A. Levinson

length of stay was 65.75 days ( SD  = 26.22) for athletes and 67.75 days for non-athletes ( SD  = 28.31). Patients were diagnosed with the following EDs: AN (restricting or binge/purge subtype), bulimia nervosa (BN), other specified feeding or eating disorder (OSFED), binge-eating disorder (BED), or

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Lisa Chaba, Stéphanie Scoffier-Mériaux, Fabienne d’Arripe-Longueville, and Vanessa Lentillon-Kaestner

Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition ( APA, 2013 ): anorexia nervosa (typical), restrictive food intake, bulimia nervosa (typical), binge eating disorder, other specified feeding or eating disorders (atypical anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder, purging, and night

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Jenny H. Conviser, Amanda Schlitzer Tierney, and Riley Nickols

.H. , Washburn , J.J. , & Aldridge , D. ( 2014 , March ). Gender differences in quality of life and functional impairment associated with binge eating disorders: A clinical population study . Paper presented at the International Conference on Eating Disorders , New York City, NY . Sundgot-Borgen , J