Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 19 items for :

  • "biomechanical demands" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Liam D. Harper, Adam Field, Liam D. Corr, and Robert J. Naughton

The aim of this investigation was to profile the physiological, physical, and biomechanical responses during walking football. A total of 17 male participants (aged 66 ± 6 years) participated. Heart rate; blood lactate; accelerometer variables (biomechanical load [PlayerLoad], changes of direction); and rating of perceived exertion were measured. Participants mean percentage of maximum heart rate was 76 ± 6% during the sessions, with rating of perceived exertion across all sessions at 13 ± 2. Blood lactate increased by ∼157% from presession (1.24 ± 0.4 mmol/L) to postsession (3.19 ± 1.7 mmol/L; p ≤ .0005). PlayerLoad values of 353 ± 67 arbitrary units were observed, as well as ∼100 changes of direction per session. In conclusion, walking football is a moderate- to vigorous-intensity activity. The longitudinal health benefits of walking football remain to be elucidated, particularly on bone health, cardiovascular fitness, and social and mental well-being.

Restricted access

Alison C. McDonald, Elora C. Brenneman, Alan C. Cudlip, and Clark R. Dickerson

As the modern workplace is dominated by submaximal repetitive tasks, knowledge of the effect of task location is important to ensure workers are unexposed to potentially injurious demands imposed by repetitive work in awkward or sustained postures. The purpose of this investigation was to develop a three-dimensional spatial map of the muscle activity for the right upper extremity during laterally directed submaximal force exertions. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded from fourteen muscles surrounding the shoulder complex as the participants exerted 40N of force in two directions (leftward, rightward) at 70 defined locations. Hand position in both push directions strongly influenced total and certain individual muscle demands as identified by repeated measures analysis of variance (P < .001). During rightward exertions individual muscle activation varied from 1 to 21% MVE and during leftward exertions it varied from 1 to 27% MVE with hand location. Continuous prediction equations for muscular demands based on three-dimensional spatial parameters were created with explained variance ranging from 25 to 73%. The study provides novel information for evaluating existing and proactive workplace designs, and may help identify preferred geometric placements of lateral exertions in occupational settings to lower muscular demands, potentially mitigating fatigue and associated musculoskeletal risks.

Restricted access

David Docherty and Matthew J. Hodgson

Recently there has been considerable interest and research into the functional significance of postactivation potentiation (PAP) on sport performance. The interest has evolved around the potential for enhancing acute performance or the long-term training effect, typically in the form of complex training. Complex training usually involves performing a weight-training exercise with high loads before executing a plyometric exercise with similar biomechanical demands. Despite a considerable amount of research in the past 10 years it would seem there is still much research to be done to fully determine whether PAP has a functional role and, if so, how to best exploit it. It is clear from the research that there are many factors that need to be considered when attempting to apply PAP to an athlete. It is possible that a well-conceived sport-specific warm-up might be as or more effective in enhancing acute performance and easier to apply in a practical setting. In addition, despite its current popularity, there has not been 1 study that has effectively examined the efficacy of complex training and whether it has any advantage over other forms of training that combine weight training and plyometrics but not in the same training session.

Restricted access

Brock Laschowski, Naser Mehrabi, and John McPhee

Paralympic wheelchair curling is an adapted version of Olympic curling played by individuals with spinal cord injuries, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, and lower extremity amputations. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, there has been no experimental or computational research published regarding the biomechanics of wheelchair curling. Accordingly, the objective of the present research was to quantify the angular joint kinematics and dynamics of a Paralympic wheelchair curler throughout the delivery. The angular joint kinematics of the upper extremity were experimentally measured using an inertial measurement unit system; the translational kinematics of the curling stone were additionally evaluated with optical motion capture. The experimental kinematics were mathematically optimized to satisfy the kinematic constraints of a subject-specific multibody biomechanical model. The optimized kinematics were subsequently used to compute the resultant joint moments via inverse dynamics analysis. The main biomechanical demands throughout the delivery (ie, in terms of both kinematic and dynamic variables) were about the hip and shoulder joints, followed sequentially by the elbow and wrist. The implications of these findings are discussed in relation to wheelchair curling delivery technique, musculoskeletal modeling, and forward dynamic simulations.

Restricted access

Aaron England, Timothy Brusseau, Ryan Burns, Dirk Koester, Maria Newton, Matthew Thiese, and Benjamin Chase

structure of experts in comparison with novices, and they work together to create a hierarchical network of BACs that mirror the task’s specific functional and biomechanical demands. Hierarchical MR structures in action knowledge decrease the cognitive exertion required to activate relevant information and

Restricted access

Rural-Living Older Adults Jolanthe de Koning * Suzanne Richards * Afroditi Stathi * 19 12 2019 1 06 2020 28 3 467 477 10.1123/japa.2019-0027 japa.2019-0027 The Physiological, Physical, and Biomechanical Demands of Walking Football: Implications for Exercise Prescription and Future Research in

Restricted access

Edward J. Bradley, Bob Hogg, and David T. Archer

engagement introduction are represented as an increase in the steady-state push phase of the scrum. This longer quasistatic loading condition changes the physiological and biomechanical demands placed on the players, especially the front row. Recent research found that fatigue resulting from repeated scrums

Restricted access

Denys Batista Campos, Isabella Christina Ferreira, Matheus Almeida Souza, Macquiden Amorim Jr, Leonardo Intelangelo, Gabriela Silveira-Nunes, and Alexandre Carvalho Barbosa

parameters, biomechanical demands of each phase must be examined to appropriately integrate the isoinertial resistance training as an overload mechanism. The purpose of the present study was to examine the selective influences of distinct acceleration profiles on the neuromuscular efficiency, force, and

Restricted access

Irineu Loturco, Timothy Suchomel, Chris Bishop, Ronaldo Kobal, Lucas A. Pereira, and Michael R. McGuigan

characteristics, it has been theorized that the BHT might reflect some biomechanical demands and functional requirements of maximum-effort sprinting. 1 Indeed, a growing body of evidence indicates that maximum running speed may be critically influenced by the ability to orient the resultant force vector

Restricted access

Alison Schinkel-Ivy, Vicki Komisar, and Carolyn A. Duncan

perturbations have also been quantified. 7 , 13 This study extends this literature by characterizing segmental contributions to balance control, as a step toward understanding the biomechanical demands of postural control in moving environments (eg, ships, trains, or airplanes). An improved understanding of