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Leeann M. Lower-Hoppe, Liz A. Wanless, Sarah M. Aldridge and Daniel W. Jones

higher education is largely in response to the movement to increase online distance education for revenue generation ( Legon & Garrett, 2017 ). However, blended learning is identified as “perhaps the most successful approach to integrating technology into pedagogy,” as pedagogical strategies are

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Jaye K. Luke and Joanna L. Morrissey

Many universities have limited resources yet aim to provide worthy learning opportunities to their students. This goal can be met through the offering of alternative delivery methods and service learning. Alternative delivery methods have evolved as technology has advanced. This paper addresses the benefits of blended learning for students, faculty, and universities. Through an institutional grant emphasizing innovative teaching strategies, the authors explain how a kinesiology course that includes service learning was transformed from a face-to-face class to a blended learning environment. Two flagship assignments are explained and comments from students are shared.

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Peter F. Bodary and M. Melissa Gross

successes and challenges that we met in the process. The first strategy incorporates a blended-learning approach in two different senior-level elective courses offered to our preprofessional undergraduate students. We discuss the methods we used for designing these courses and the lessons learned during

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Chad M. Killian and Amelia Mays Woods

; Schultz et al., 2014 ). Those students suggested that a blended learning approach would be more helpful, whereby online content would introduce basic content and the more complex content would be covered in class so that individuals could ask questions in real time ( Schultz et al., 2014 ). These issues

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Jeff Stewart and Vivian H. Wright

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Todd A. Gilson and Jinhong Jung

The present state of higher education is in a period of transition as alternative forms of content dissemination via blended learning and exclusively online class models continue to expand. In addition, traditional universities face increased pressure to deliver content “on-demand” for the learner from an increasing number of nonprofit and for-profit organizations. In this article, key principles for creating and distributing content for online education are discussed. Furthermore, solutions used by the authors in their own teaching are shared as an additional resource for the reader. Finally, the benefits and drawbacks of two widely known software platforms are explored as they relate to the functionality of delivering content online to students.

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David Adams, Brendan Cropley and Richard Mullen

The purpose of the current study was to empirically examine the potential course content, structure, and delivery mechanisms for a dedicated elite youth coach education programme in football (soccer) in the UK. By achieving this aim it was the intention of the authors to use the findings of this study for the future development of a customised coach education programme. Fifteen elite coaches, working in youth football at the time of the study, participated in one of three focus groups. Emerging from content analysis procedures, the findings placed specific importance on the development of an athlete-centred coaching philosophy, a focus on behaviours and activities associated with positive youth development, a movement away from traditional practices, and the development of the skills required to learn through reflective practice. In addition, a range of pedagogical approaches, including social approaches to learning, mentoring, and blended learning, were highlighted as ways to better deliver education programmes.

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Chad M. Killian, Christopher J. Kinder and Amelia Mays Woods

lectures. Classes are then dedicated to applying the online content through student-centered active learning opportunities ( Yarbro, Arfstrom, McKnight, & McKnight, 2014 ). Research on blended learning has occurred predominantly in the higher education environment, but a base of research is growing

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Thomas J. Templin, Jason R. Carter and Kim C. Graber

engagement: active learning, blended learning, and gameful learning. Their contribution in this special issue outlines each approach, as well as providing benefits for student learning and challenges for faculty innovators. Attendees had the good fortune of hearing James Morrow give a thoughtful, humorous

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Margaret T. Harris and Mike Metzler

Evergreen Education Group provides the most up-to-date national perspective of K-12 online and blended learning; according to their most recent report, all 50 states have some sort of online learning option for students, ranging from single course offerings through brick-and-mortar schools to those offered