Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 59 items for :

  • "cardiovascular disease risk factors" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Christopher C. Draheim, Daniel P. Williams and Jeffrey A. McCubbin

The purpose of the study is to determine whether cardiovascular disease risk factor differences exist between Active Special Olympians, Inactive Non-Special Olympians, and Active Non-Special Olympians. Resting blood pressure, total and abdominal body fat, fasting cholesterol profiles, and fasting insulin were measured in 145 (72 women, 73 men) adults with mild mental retardation. Active Special Olympians (n = 45) possessed lower diastolic blood pressures, body fat percentages, abdominal fat, triglycerides, and insulin than Inactive Non-Special Olympians (n = 38) and possessed lower body fat percentages than Active Non-Special Olympians (n = 62). Active Non-Special Olympians possessed lower triglycerides and insulin than Inactive Non-Special Olympians. Future prospective trials are needed to determine whether Special Olympics participation may be one effective component of community-based physical activity programs aimed at reducing cardiovascular disease risk.

Restricted access

Humberto José Gomes Silva, Lars Bo Andersen, Mara Cristina Lofrano-Prado, Mauro V.G. Barros, Ismael Fortes Freitas Jr., James Hill and Wagner Luiz do Prado

Background:

It is unclear how different exercise intensities affect cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in obese adolescents. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of high-intensity (HIT) vs. low-intensity (LIT) aerobic training on CVD risk factors in obese adolescents.

Methods:

Forty-three obese adolescents (age: 15.7 ± 1.3 years, BMI: 34.3 ± 4.1kg/m2) participated this study either HIT (corresponding to ventilatory threshold I; N = 20) or LIT (20% below ventilatory threshold I; N = 23) for 12 weeks. All sessions were isocaloric (350 kcal). All participants received the same nutritional, psychological, and clinical counseling. Subjects were assessed in fatness, fitness, lipid profile, and glucose at baseline and after 12 weeks. The CVD risk factors assessed were waist circumference (WC), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), glucose, and fitness, which were single and clustered analyzed (z scores sum).

Results:

Body mass, Body Mass Index, fatness, and WC were improved (P < .001) in both groups. The sum of z scores (WC + TC + glucose-fitness-HDL) improved in both HIT (12 weeks = −2.16 SD; Cohen’s d = .45) and LIT (12 weeks = −2.13 SD; Cohen’s d = .60) without groups differences. Changes in fitness were associated with changes in WC (r = −.48; P = .003).

Conclusion:

HIT does not promote any additional improvements in CVD risk factors than LIT in obese adolescents.

Restricted access

Sandra Guerra, José Carlos Ribeiro, José Oliveira, Armando Teixeira-Pinto, J.W.R. Twisk, José Alberto Duarte and Jorge Mota

The purposes of the present study were to analyze the stability of biological risk factors for CVD (blood pressure [BP], percentage of fat mass [%FM], total cholesterol [TC]) and one behavioral/life style risk factor (physical activity [PA]), as well as to study the stability of biological risk factors clustering. The sample comprised 325 males and 367 females, aged 8-15 years old. Participants were classified as being “at risk” according to age and sex adjusted 4th quartile or the first for PA. Three biological risk factors (%FM, SBP and TC) showed higher stability (one-year interval; r = 0.9–0.5) than DBP (r = 0.3) and PAI (r = 0.3). It can be concluded that 46% of subjects with two and/or three biological risk factors at the first measurement remained with the same number of biological risk factors in the second measurement.

Restricted access

Chris Riddoch, Dawn Edwards, Angie Page, Karsten Froberg, Sigmund A. Anderssen, Niels Wedderkopp, Søren Brage, Ashley R. Cooper, Luis B. Sardinha, Maarike Harro, Lena Klasson-Heggebø, Willem van Mechelen, Colin Boreham, Ulf Ekelund, Lars Bo Andersen and The European Youth Heart Study Team

Background:

The aim of the European Youth Heart Study (EYHS) is to establish the nature, strength, and interactions between personal, environmental, and lifestyle influences on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in European children.

Methods:

The EYHS is an international study measuring CVD risk factors, and their associated influences, in children. Relationships between these independent factors and risk of disease will inform the design of CVD interventions in children. A minimum of 1000 boys and girls ages 9 and 15 y were recruited from four European countries—Denmark, Estonia, Norway, and Portugal. Variables measured included physical, biochemical, lifestyle, psychosocial, and sociodemographic data.

Results:

Of the 5664 children invited to participate, 4169 (74%) accepted. Response rates for most individual tests were moderate to high. All test protocols were well received by the children.

Conclusions:

EYHS protocols are valid, reliable, acceptable to children, and feasible for use in large, field-based studies.

Restricted access

Stig Eiberg, Henriette Hasselstrom, Vivian Grønfeldt, Karsten Froberg, Ashley Cooper and Lars Bo Andersen

The aim of this study was to investigate whether risk factors for cardiovascular disease cluster in 6- to 7-year-old children and whether low physical fitness is a predictor of risk factor clustering. The study included 369 boys (6.8 ± 0.4 years) and 327 girls (6.7 ± 0.4 years). VO2max was directly measured during a treadmill test. The ratio of total cholesterol to high-density cholesterol, triglyceride levels, the ratio of insulin to glucose, systolic blood pressure, and the sum of four skinfolds were selected as risk factors. A child was considered at risk for individual factors if he or she had values in the least favorable quartile. The number of children with more than three cardiovascular disease cluster risk factors was not significantly different from a binominal distribution. This lack of clustering could be a result of the fact that these young children have not yet developed insulin resistance. Children in the lowest quartile of fitness had an odds ratio of 2.1 (CI: 1.0–4.4) for having three or more risk factors compared with the most fit. This is interesting with regard to prevention because it indicates that an intervention involving increased physical activity might postpone or even prevent the development of risk factors.

Restricted access

Joowon Lee, Baojiang Chen, Harold W. Kohl III, Carolyn E. Barlow, Chong Do Lee, Nina B. Radford, Laura F. DeFina and Kelley P. Gabriel

.80 [0.62, 1.04] .09 Note . Model 1 = age and sex; Model 2 = Model 1 plus aerobic physical activity (metabolic equivalent of task minutes per week); Model 3 = Model 2 plus cardiovascular disease risk factors (body mass index, hypertension, total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and

Restricted access

Chantal A. Vella, Erin D. Michos, Dorothy D. Sears, Mary Cushman, Rachel B. Van Hollebeke, Michelle M. Wiest and Matthew A. Allison

, cardiovascular disease risk factors, adiposity, and markers of inflammation. Methods Participants The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) is a longitudinal cohort study of adults from 6 regions across the United States. The overall design of the MESA study has been published. 12 In brief, the cohort

Restricted access

Katrina D. DuBose, Andrew J. McKune, Patricia Brophy, Gabriel Geyer and Robert C. Hickner

The relationship between physical activity levels and the metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) score was examined in 72 boys and girls (9.5 ± 1.2 years). A fasting blood draw was obtained; waist circumference and blood pressure measured, and an accelerometer was worn for 5 days. Established cut points were used to estimate time spent in moderate, vigorous, moderate-to-vigorous (MVPA), and total physical activity. A continuous MetSyn score was created from blood pressure, waist circumference, high-density-lipoprotein, triglyceride, and glucose values. Regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between physical activity levels, the MetSyn score, and its related components. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between meeting physical activity recommendations, the MetSyn score, and its related components. All analyses were controlled for body mass index group, age, sex, and race. Time spent in different physical activity levels or meeting physical activity recommendations (OR: 0.87, 95%CI: 0.69–1.09) was not related with the MetSyn score after controlling for potential confounders (p > .05). Moderate physical activity, MVPA, and meeting physical activity recommendations were related to a lower diastolic blood pressure (p < .05). No other relationships were observed (p > .05). While physical activity participation was not related with the MetSyn, lower diastolic blood pressure values were related to higher physical activity levels.

Restricted access

Trynke Hoekstra, Colin A. Boreham, Liam J. Murray and Jos W.R. Twisk

Background:

It is not clear what the relative contribution is of specific components of physical fitness (aerobic and muscular) to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. We investigated associations between aerobic fitness (endurance) and muscular fitness (power) and CVD risk factors.

Methods:

Data were obtained from the Young Hearts project, a representative sample of 12- and 15-year-old boys and girls from Northern Ireland (N = 2016). Aerobic fitness was determined by the 20-m shuttle run test, muscular fitness by the Sargent jump test. CVD risk factors included sum of skinfolds, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, serum total cholesterol (TC), HDL cholesterol, and TC:HDL ratio. Several linear regression analyses were conducted for 4 age and gender groups separately, with the risk factor as the outcome variable.

Results:

Significant associations between aerobic fitness and a healthy CVD risk profile were found. These observed relationships were independent of power, whereas the (few) relationships between muscular fitness and the risk factors were partly explained by endurance.

Conclusions:

Tailored, preventive strategies during adolescence, incorporating endurance rather than power sports, could be encouraged to help prevent CVD. This is important because existing studies propose that healthiness during adulthood is founded on healthiness in adolescence.

Restricted access

Viewpoint Boosting of Performance in the Athlete with High-Level Spinal Injury Roy J. Shephard * 4 2003 20 2 103 117 10.1123/apaq.20.2.103 Research Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factor Differences between Special Olympians and Non-Special Olympians Christopher C. Draheim * Daniel P. Williams