Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 46 items for :

  • "career transitions" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Fleur E.C.A. van Rens and Edson Filho

, 2018 ). Career transitions to contemporary circus are thus common amongst athletes, and gymnasts in particular. However, little is known about the lived experiences of circus artists, as few systematic studies have considered this performance domain ( Ross & Shapiro, 2017 ). Given that practitioners in

Restricted access

Patrick H.F. Baillie and Steven J. Danish

Transition out of a career in sports has been suggested as being a difficult and disruptive process for many athletes. An early and enduring identification, familiarity, and preference for the role of athlete may cause its loss to be a significant stressor for the elite, Olympic, or professional athlete. The purpose of this paper is to describe the various aspects of the career transition process in sports, beginning with early identification with the role of athlete and continuing through retirement from active participation in competitive sports. Athletes are often poorly prepared for the off-time event of leaving sports, and traditional theories of retirement may not be suitable. People associated with athletes (coaches, peers, management, family members, and sport psychologists) and athletes themselves need to be aware of the potential for difficulty during their career transition.

Restricted access

Siobhain McArdle, Phil Moore and Deirdre Lyons

Career pathways in high performance sport include a number of emotionally resonant transitions. Sport systems must be able to effectively support the athlete’s endeavors to negotiate such challenges. This study investigated qualitatively the experiences of Olympic athletes who took part in a three-tier, post-games career transition support program. The aim of the program was to increase athletes’ coping resources to successful negotiate the post-Olympic period. Ten athletes who participated in the program were recruited to participate in semi structured individual interviews. Directed content analysis was employed to identify key themes in the data. Athletes perceived two components of the program as particularly helpful, the normalization of the emotional and psychological challenge of the post Games period and the use of problem focused coping to redirect athlete focus to the future. The findings from this study provide a preliminary framework for the planning of future post-Games career transition support programs.

Restricted access

David Lavallee

The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the effectiveness of a life development intervention on career transition adjustment in retired professional athletes. Intervention (n = 32) and control groups (n = 39) were recruited for this study, both of which contained recently retired male professional soccer players. Data were collected on measures of career termination adjustment and coping with transitions, and the intervention group also participated in a life development intervention package. Results revealed significant postintervention treatment group differences on career transition adjustment in favor of the life development intervention, while significant within-group differences on career transition adjustment over time were also achieved for the intervention group. Results are discussed in relation to the personal and developmental costs of pursuing performance excellence.

Restricted access

Sine Agergaard and Tatiana V. Ryba

With rising globalization and professionalization within sports, athletes are increasingly migrating across national borders to take up work, and their athletic and nonathletic development is thereby shaped and lived in different countries. Through the analysis of interviews with female professional transnational athletes, this article contextualizes and discusses arguments for developing an interdisciplinary framework to account for lived experiences of the close intertwining between transnational migration and career development in professional sports. By combining our psychological and sociological perspectives, we identify three normative career transitions for transnational athletes. First of all, transnational recruitment that draws on social networks as well as individual agency. Secondly, establishment as a transnational athlete that is connected to cultural and psychological adaptation as well as development of transnational belonging, and thirdly, professional athletic career termination that for transnational athletes is connected to a (re)constitution of one’s transnational network and sense of belonging.

Restricted access

Randy C. Battochio, Robert J. Schinke, Danny L. Battochio, Wayne Halliwell and Gershon Tenenbaum

Through adaptation studies in elite sport, researchers can delineate the strategies that amateur and professional athletes employ during career transitions (e.g., promotion, relocation). Fiske (2004) identified five core motives as catalysts to adaptation: understanding, controlling, self-enhancement, belonging, and trusting, which were recently contextualized in sport as a result of one archival study examining the second hand experiences of National Hockey League (NHL) players. The purpose of the present study was to learn about the adaptation process of NHL players based on a first hand data source (i.e., semi-structured interview). A semi-structured open-ended interview guide was utilized to learn about the experiences of four groups of NHL players (n = 11): prospects (n = 3), rookies (n = 3), veterans (n = 2), and retirees (n = 3). There is an indication that adaptation strategies and sub-strategies vary according to the player’s career stage and the challenges related to seeking and maintaining a roster spot. The findings are also consistent with Fiske’s five core motives and earlier adaptation sub-strategies, in addition to uncovering three novel sub-strategies (i.e., understanding one’s performance, distraction control, and trusting player agents). Implications and recommendations are provided for sport researchers and practitioners.

Restricted access

Monna Arvinen-Barrow, Kelsey DeGrave, Stephen Pack and Brian Hemmings

transition. The process of career transition has typically been accompanied by changes in athletes’ self-perception, emotions, and relationships with those around them (e.g.,  Morris, Tod, & Oliver, 2015 ), and as such, are likely to have a significant impact on the athlete and their life beyond the

Restricted access

Anne Holding, Jo-Annie Fortin, Joëlle Carpentier, Nora Hope and Richard Koestner

as “identity disruptions” ( Lally, 2007 ), “career transition distress” ( Taylor & Ogilvie, 2001 ) and decreases in well-being ( Stephan, 2003 ). Although this adjustment does not appear to be problematic for all retiring athletes ( Park, Lavallee, & Tod, 2013 ); there is evidence that some athletes

Restricted access

Leonardo Ruiz, Judy L. Van Raalte, Thaddeus France and Al Petitpas

themes were derived from the data: (a) athletes’ hopes and dreams, (b) stress, (c) faith, and (d) career transitions. Athletes’ Hopes and Dreams When reflecting on their hopes and dreams, these professional baseball players discussed two main areas, their hopes that they would play Major League Baseball

Restricted access

Thomas P. Oates

confrontational style more deliberately. Hip Hop Cosmopolitanism: Jay-Z’s Career Transition In the summer of 2003, Jay-Z faced a professional crossroads. His career in hip hop had been spectacularly successful. He had sold more than 30 million albums and his Blueprint 2 and Blueprint 2.1 albums were