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Nicolas Robin, Lucette Toussaint, Guillaume R. Coudevylle, Shelly Ruart, Olivier Hue and Stephane Sinnapah

adoption than younger people do, seniors are more digitally connected than ever ( Anderson & Perrin, 2017 ). Whereas only 49% of adults aged 65–74 are smartphone owners, more than 93% of them have a cell phone of some kind with which they can send or receive text messages. Texting as a tool for health

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Matthew D. Bird and Brandonn S. Harris

landline telephone ( M  = 2.62, SD  = 1.12) was reported as the most frequently utilized form of technology by practitioners. This was followed by cell phone ( M  = 2.34, SD  = 1.16), and email ( M  = 2.29, SD  = 1.02). When providing performance enhancement services to individual clients, instant

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Yoshimi Fukuoka, Emiko Kamitani, Kathleen Dracup and So Son Jong

Objectives:

The purposes of this study were 1) to determine compliance with a pedometer and mobile phone-based physical activity diary, and 2) to assess concordance between self-reported daily steps recorded and transmitted by a mobile phone and pedometer-measured daily steps in sedentary women.

Methods:

In this 3-week pilot clinical study, 41 sedentary women who met all inclusion criteria were recruited from local communities. We asked the participants to wear a pedometer every day and to report their daily steps using a mobile phone diary each night before retiring. In the first week, women were asked to monitor their daily steps (baseline steps). In the second and third weeks, they were asked to increase their steps by 20% from the previous week. Although the pedometer can automatically store the most recent 41 days’ performance, the participants were not informed of this function of the pedometer.

Results:

Overall compliance was 93.8% with pedometer use and 88.3% with the mobile phone physical activity diary. Bland Altman plots showed that the agreement between self-reported daily steps by mobile phone diary and pedometer-recorded daily steps from week 1 to week 3 was high.

Conclusion:

The combination of a pedometer and a mobile phone diary may enhance the quality of self-reported data in clinical studies.

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Lia Grego Muniz de Araújo, Bruna Camilo Turi, Bruna Locci, Camila Angélica Asahi Mesquita, Natália Bonicontro Fonsati and Henrique Luiz Monteiro

arrival of new technological options replaced traditional activities involving physical effort, supporting the sedentary lifestyle. 3 , 4 The time spent in sedentary activities, such as television (TV), video games, computers, and cell phones, is considered a public health problem because of its

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Benjamin L. Long, A. Isabella Gillespie and Martin L. Tanaka

Mental distractions and physical impairments can increase the risk of accidents by affecting a driver’s ability to control the vehicle. In this article, we developed a linear mathematical model that can be used to quantitatively predict drivers’ performance over a variety of possible driving conditions. Predictions were not limited only to conditions tested, but also included linear combinations of these tests conditions. Two groups of 12 participants were evaluated using a custom drivers’ reaction speed testing device to evaluate the effect of cell phone talking, texting, and a fixed knee brace on the components of drivers’ reaction speed. Cognitive reaction time was found to increase by 24% for cell phone talking and 74% for texting. The fixed knee brace increased musculoskeletal reaction time by 24%. These experimental data were used to develop a mathematical model to predict reaction speed for an untested condition, talking on a cell phone with a fixed knee brace. The model was verified by comparing the predicted reaction speed to measured experimental values from an independent test. The model predicted full braking time within 3% of the measured value. Although only a few influential conditions were evaluated, we present a general approach that can be expanded to include other types of distractions, impairments, and environmental conditions.

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Robert Medairos, Vicky Kang, Carissa Aboubakare, Matthew Kramer and Sheila Ann Dugan

Background:

This study aims to identify patterns of use and preferences related to technology platforms that could support physical activity (PA) programs in an underserved population.

Methods:

A 29-item questionnaire was administered at 5 health and wellness sites targeting low income communities in Chicago. Frequency tables were generated for Internet, cell phone, and social media use and preferences. Chi-squared analysis was used to evaluate differences across age and income groups.

Results:

A total of 291 individuals participated and were predominantly female (69.0%). Majority reported incomes less than $30,000 (72.9%) and identified as African American/Black/Caribbean (49.3%) or Mexican/Mexican American (34.3%). Most participants regularly used smartphones (63.2%) and the Internet (75.9%). Respondents frequently used Facebook (84.8%), and less commonly used Instagram (43.6%), and Twitter (20.0%). Free Internet-based exercise programs were the most preferred method to increase PA levels (31.6%), while some respondents (21.0%) thought none of the surveyed technology applications would help.

Conclusion:

Cell phone, Internet, and social media use is common among the surveyed underserved population. Technology preferences to increase PA levels varied, with a considerable number of respondents not preferring the surveyed technology platforms. Creating educational opportunities to increase awareness may maximize the effectiveness of technology-based PA interventions.

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Ricky Malott, Noah Jackson, William Strome, Joe Bisson and Nola Agha

Experience, LLC is a start-up company that sells in-game seat upgrades during live sporting events using text messaging and cell phone apps. From a user standpoint, a small upgrade fee results in better seats and a better game experience. From a venue or team standpoint, Experience fills unused inventory resulting in increased revenues and more satisfied fans with higher repurchase intentions. Experience is looking to expand its services beyond single-game upgrades to a full-season ticket that is based on filling open, but previously sold, inventory. This case illustrates the forces at play in the ticketing industry, describes the features of each service, and provides an opportunity to decide on the expansion strategy for a fast-growing start-up company.

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Scott Owens, Laurel Lambert, Suzanne McDonough, Kenneth Green and Mark Loftin

This pilot study examined the feasibility of an interactive obesity prevention program delivered to a class of fourth-grade students utilizing daily e-mail messages sent to the students’ home computers. The study involved a single intact class of 22 students, 17 (77%) of whom submitted parental permission documentation and received e-mail messages each school day over the course of one month. Concerns regarding Internet safety and children’s use of e-mail were addressed fairly easily. Cost/benefit issues for the school did not seem prohibitive. Providing e-mail access to students without a home computer was accomplished by loaning them personal digital assistant (PDA) devices. In larger interventions, loaning PDAs is probably not feasible economically, although cell phones may be an acceptable alternative. It was concluded that this type of interactive obesity prevention program is feasible from most perspectives. Data from a larger scale effectiveness study is still needed.

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Dan Nemet

As the incidence of childhood obesity increases, there is a need to promote leisure time physical activity. Traditional approaches to promote the population physical activity levels have shown at best moderate improvements. High percentage of children today carry a cell phone, thus the use of this portable device seems promising for enhancing physical activity.

Pokémon Go, is a smartphone game that uses augmented reality, where players are incentivized to get out and walk significant distances to catch the Pokémon. Initial reports suggested increases in the number of steps that players performed, yet this effect of the game was not sustained. Incorporating physical activity into modern technology seems promising, clearly there is need to explore creative ways to achieve a longer term effect.

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Emily Read

Background:

Rural Canadians are at increased risk of metabolic syndrome. Physical inactivity is a primary target for preventing and reversing metabolic syndrome. Adherence to lifestyle interventions may be enhanced using cell phones and self-monitoring technologies. This study investigated the feasibility of a physical activity and self-monitoring intervention targeting high-risk adults in rural Ontario.

Methods:

Rural adults (n = 25, mean = 57.0 ± 8.7 years) with ≥ 2 criteria for metabolic syndrome participated in an 8-week stage-matched physical activity and self-monitoring intervention. Participants monitored blood glucose, blood pressure, weight, and physical activity using self-monitoring devices and Blackberry Smart phones. VO2max, stage of change, waist circumference, weight, blood lipids, and HbA1c were measured at weeks 1, 4, and 8.

Results:

Adherence to self-monitoring was > 94%. Participants’ experiences and perceptions of the technology were positive. Mean stage of change increased 1 stage, physical activity increased 26%, and predicted VO2max increased 17% (P < .05). Significant changes in weight, waist circumference, diastolic blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, and total cholesterol were found.

Conclusions:

This stage-matched technology intervention for increased physical activity was feasible and effective.